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  1. 17 Aug '06 20:11 / 1 edit
    Who is with me that "How to Reasess Your Chess" is one of the best middle game books for people class D to master if not the best.
  2. Standard member TEXASmade
    President of Texas
    17 Aug '06 20:15
    Originally posted by tomtom232
    Who is with me that "How to Reasess Your Chess" is one of the best middle game books for people class D to master if not the best.
    OMG I AM TOTALLY WITH YOU!!! REC!
  3. 17 Aug '06 21:01
    yep, reassess your chess is chess jesus for amateurs.
  4. 17 Aug '06 21:42
    Not me, Class B and up I say. For class D there so some many other books which would help you way more.
  5. Standard member TEXASmade
    President of Texas
    17 Aug '06 23:28
    Originally posted by RahimK
    Not me, Class B and up I say. For class D there so some many other books which would help you way more.
    I agree. The first book I read was The Art of Checkmate by George Renaud and Victor Kahn...its done good things for me.
  6. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    18 Aug '06 00:23 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by TEXASmade
    I agree. The first book I read was The Art of Checkmate by George Renaud and Victor Kahn...its done good things for me.
    Terrific book! Certainly one of the best.


    Another exceptional one is Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual, but none have done more for my early chess development than Wijk aan Zee Grandmaster Chess Tournament, 1975 and Horwitz, Chess Openings: Theory and Practice. These were my bibles thirty years ago, and they gave me a solid foundation.
  7. Standard member TEXASmade
    President of Texas
    18 Aug '06 01:21
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    Terrific book! Certainly one of the best.


    Another exceptional one is Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual, but none have done more for my early chess development than Wijk aan Zee Grandmaster Chess Tournament, 1975 and Horwitz, Chess Openings: Theory and Practice. These were my bibles thirty years ago, and they gave me a solid foundation.
    Im gonna look into those, thanks for posting them...
  8. 18 Aug '06 02:50
    Nobody ever mentions the fact that Reassess Your Chess (and workbook) are superbly organized. The illustrations of masters at work are terrific and the layout is easy on the eyes. The content, of course, is solid, but the packaging is great too. Influential games collections for me were the two Alekhine's My Best Games of Chess and Fischer's 60 Memorable Games.
  9. 18 Aug '06 03:09
    Originally posted by RahimK
    Not me, Class B and up I say. For class D there so some many other books which would help you way more.
    I think it is still nescesary for beginners to know the concept of planning and no one said they had to read the whole book.
  10. 18 Aug '06 15:04
    If someone told me I could only have one chess book, then it would be: "Capablanca's Best Chess Endings," by Chernev.
  11. 18 Aug '06 15:53
    Originally posted by tomtom232
    I think it is still nescesary for beginners to know the concept of planning and no one said they had to read the whole book.
    There's All 7 of Yasser Seirwan's Winning Chess Series.

    You will get more out of that at class D.
  12. Standard member Wiabj
    The Black Swan
    18 Aug '06 17:13
    Look at the books from M.Dvoretsky, sublime and excellent books! The book about endgames, maybe the most interesting and difficult part of the game I like the most. Also the books from J.Timman, he I am dutch are good !!
  13. 18 Aug '06 20:18
    Originally posted by RahimK
    There's All 7 of Yasser Seirwan's Winning Chess Series.

    You will get more out of that at class D.
    I agree that you should read those but to use the ideas of force space time and pawn structure you have to be able to plan. and planning is what How to Reasess Your Chess is dedicated to.
  14. 18 Aug '06 20:22
    Originally posted by tomtom232
    I agree that you should read those but to use the ideas of force space time and pawn structure you have to be able to plan. and planning is what How to Reasess Your Chess is dedicated to.
    No way.. You get a brand new chess player, teach him how the pieces move and then make him read all 7 books, he will play great chess.

    You make him read reasses your chess and he won't get much out of it. I bet you the Yasser book read would waste the How to reasses your chess reader.

    This is like in school, you read the Physics 10 text compared to reading the Physics 30 text.
  15. 18 Aug '06 20:25
    Originally posted by RahimK
    No way.. You get a brand new chess player, teach him how the pieces move and then make him read all 7 books, he will play great chess.

    You make him read reasses your chess and he won't get much out of it. I bet you the Yasser book read would waste the How to reasses your chess reader.

    This is like in school, you read the Physics 10 text compared to reading the Physics 30 text.
    yes but remeber the intro to reasess your chess. read it and you won't get immediate results but after a while when your tactics get better and you get better at using the material in the book you will eventually get better than the yasser reader will ever get unless he reads this book to. My point is that you have to create a good foundation to get past the expert point in chess.