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  1. 26 Jul '07 02:47
  2. 26 Jul '07 02:49
    Winning Chess Series by Gm Yasser S.

    To get you started:

    http://www.princeton.edu/~jedwards/cif/intro.html
  3. 26 Jul '07 02:52
    Originally posted by RahimK
    Winning Chess Series by Gm Yasser S.

    To get you started:

    http://www.princeton.edu/~jedwards/cif/intro.html
    thank you .
  4. 26 Jul '07 02:53
    That's what I'm here for
  5. 26 Jul '07 04:42
    Another winner: "Logical Chess: Move by Move," by Irving Chernev. Chernev also wrote an excellent introduction to chess called, "Invitation to Chess." You might try this one first. Good intro to the basics like space, time, mobility, etc.
  6. 26 Jul '07 07:34
    I would say Sierawan's Play Winning Chess to get all the basics & then Chernev's Logical Chess: Move by Move.

    You won't understand some of the things in Chernev's crucial novice book without understanding tactics & the very basics of strategy. That's why I suggest Play Winning Chess as a perfect partner for it.

    These 2 are all you need to get you from 1000-1500.
  7. 26 Jul '07 10:41
    Originally posted by Squelchbelch
    I would say Sierawan's Play Winning Chess to get all the basics & [b]then Chernev's Logical Chess: Move by Move.

    You won't understand some of the things in Chernev's crucial novice book without understanding tactics & the very basics of strategy. That's why I suggest Play Winning Chess as a perfect partner for it.

    These 2 are all you need to get you from 1000-1500.[/b]
    thank you, b,
  8. Standard member onyx2006
    onyx2007
    26 Jul '07 11:14
    The "best" and probably most unheard of book I've read, that would be ideal for someone of that level is

    "THE DAILY TELEGRAPH GUIDE TO CHESS"

    Malcom Pein, it's a good book, small, cheap, but covers a lot and is an interesting read with plenty of stuff.

    J
  9. 26 Jul '07 14:23
    Originally posted by onyx2006
    The "best" and probably most unheard of book I've read, that would be ideal for someone of that level is

    "THE DAILY TELEGRAPH GUIDE TO CHESS"

    Malcom Pein, it's a good book, small, cheap, but covers a lot and is an interesting read with plenty of stuff.

    J
    thank you , anything has to be better than the idiots guide to Chess.
  10. 26 Jul '07 14:26
    A really good one for the 1000 level player is volume 2 of the Comprehensive Chess Course by Lev Alburt
  11. 26 Jul '07 14:28
    Chess Fundamentals, by Capablanca is a good start for a 1000 level player. Any edition of Modern Chess Openings may help you too, just look at the key positions of some major openings after 3-4 moves and don't waste time trying to memorize variations 10 moves deep. You won't remember them and they don't work OTB anyway.
  12. 26 Jul '07 16:36 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Sam The Sham
    Chess Fundamentals, by Capablanca is a good start for a 1000 level player. Any edition of Modern Chess Openings may help you too, just look at the key positions of some major openings after 3-4 moves and don't waste time trying to memorize variations 10 moves deep. You won't remember them and they don't work OTB anyway.
    Yes.
    Ignore anyone who suggests studying openings in any depth.
    You need to focus on basic principles such as:

    -study tactics. Get a basic puzzle book for beginners & try to do 40 puzzles a day. When you finish the book, start again!
    -open with a center pawn move
    -not too many early pawn moves. 2 or 3 in the first 7 or 8 moves should be plenty
    -develop with a threat if possible
    -knights before bishops - this is because it takes longer for knights to advance & generally Nf3/f6, Nc3/c6 are the best squares early on
    -don't move the same piece twice in the opening
    -don't move the queen past the 3rd rank early on - it can be attacked my minor opposition pieces losing time
    -clear the back rank & connect rooks by castling (KS is best)
    -play for control of the center
    -look for any move that attacks 2 pieces or pawns at the same time
    -rooks love 1/2 open or open files - put them there before your opponent!
    -if you get a passed-pawn stick a rook behind it then push the pawn!
    -watch for opponent's threats before you look at your possibilities
    -try to plan ahead - what is your best move/your opponents best reply & then your best follow-up?
    -exchange pieces when ahead. Any minor material lead is only exagerrated when there's less on the board
    -activate your king in the endgame, don't keep it tucked away in the corner


    I could go on, but if you try to follow these very basic motifs you should be well ahead of the 900-1200 players you are up against at the moment.
  13. 26 Jul '07 16:45
    Pandolfinis "Weapons of Chess" was a great book that taught me the basics and launched me into the game head on. It really gave me an understanding of some of the ultimate goals and subtleties of long-term play, which would probably win alot of games for you once you get into the middle and endgame. Although, this knowledge does not suffice unless coupled with tactical knowledge as well. For tactics, I learned from this website: http://www.chesstactics.org/ - very well done and easy to use. I highly reccomend these two resources.
  14. 26 Jul '07 21:23
    Originally posted by Sam The Sham
    Chess Fundamentals, by Capablanca is a good start for a 1000 level player. Any edition of Modern Chess Openings may help you too, just look at the key positions of some major openings after 3-4 moves and don't waste time trying to memorize variations 10 moves deep. You won't remember them and they don't work OTB anyway.
    When he was asked what he thought the best chess book ever written was, Mikhal Botvinnik responded "Chess Fundmentals" by Capablanca.
    Botvinnik said that there was something of value in that book for every level of player.

    Modern Chess Openings is another matter, IMO. For a player rated under 1200, about the biggest waste of time and money that I can think of is to buy and study MCO. After a player has reached 1200, he or she should read a book like the excellent "Winning Chess Openings" by Yasser Seirawan before tackling MCO.
  15. 26 Jul '07 21:34
    Originally posted by Squelchbelch
    Yes.
    Ignore anyone who suggests studying openings in any depth.
    You need to focus on basic principles such as:

    [i]-study tactics. Get a basic puzzle book for beginners & try to do 40 puzzles a day. When you finish the book, start again!
    -open with a center pawn move
    -not too many early pawn moves. 2 or 3 in the first 7 or 8 moves should be ple ...[text shortened]... c motifs you should be well ahead of the 900-1200 players you are up against at the moment.
    thank you for the time you took. i really appreciate it and the thoughts to push my pawn and connect my rooks. i never thought of it that way. thanks again, and good luck, b