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  1. 03 Sep '10 03:41
    Hello everybody. Looking for a little advice. I believe my next chess purchase will be an endgame book. My question is which one do you think is the better choice? Pandolfini's or Silman's? Any help would be greatly appreciated. - Joe
  2. 03 Sep '10 13:19
    Silman's

    toet.
  3. 03 Sep '10 13:50
    Originally posted by toeternitoe
    Silman's

    toet.
    Yes
  4. Standard member sbacat
    Eddie's Dad
    03 Sep '10 14:56
    Loved Silman's. Actually made it the whole way through cover to cover. Doesn't happen often with a chess book.
  5. Standard member irontigran
    Rob Scheider is..
    03 Sep '10 15:53
    If Mr. Anti-Endgame reads an endgame book and doesnt melt into a pile of goo, it must be different than the rest 😉

    I too liked Silmans.
    btw, his account on facebook is actually him and accepts everyone.
  6. Standard member Thabtos
    I am become Death
    03 Sep '10 16:42
    Silman's book is okay, but if you want to really work on endgames, Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual and Shereshevsky's Endgame Strategy are the way to go.
  7. 03 Sep '10 23:30
    Howell's "Essential Chess Endings" is the best for practical play. If you find one, grab it fast.

    Jesus deVilla's "100 Endgames You must know" is best for theoretical endgames.

    Dvoretsky's books make me think chess is boring.
  8. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    04 Sep '10 00:42
    GM Jon Speelman wrote a pair of books, Analyzing the Endgame and Endgame Preparation that not only made me smarter and rethink my approach to endgames, but they made me rethink my approach to chess.

    I probably would start with Silman's book or Seirawan's Winning Chess Endings, and then perhaps try to get Speelman's books, although they may be out of print now.

    Paul
  9. Standard member caissad4
    Child of the Novelty
    04 Sep '10 00:58
    Paul Keres wrote a great book.
  10. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    04 Sep '10 01:08
    Originally posted by caissad4
    Paul Keres wrote a great book.
    That was my first endgame book. An excellent book- parts were over my head at the time, but his chapter on bishop endings was very valuable to me. His game against Smyslov in that section became a permanent part of my chess memory!
  11. 04 Sep '10 02:02
    I learned a lot from Irving Chernev's Practical Chess Endings. You can probably find it cheap on amazon. Pandolfini's Endgame Course has a lot of incorrect diagrams in it. Other than that, it is a good first book for endgames.
  12. 04 Sep '10 02:34
    Originally posted by JDChess
    Hello everybody. Looking for a little advice. I believe my next chess purchase will be an endgame book. My question is which one do you think is the better choice? Pandolfini's or Silman's? Any help would be greatly appreciated. - Joe
    Reuben Fine's Basic Chess Endings is a really good book. Get the Benko Edition with algebraic notation.
  13. 05 Sep '10 06:54
    hey paul,

    How did the Speelman books change your thinking? That's a very interesting line and if you've got the time, I'd like to hear more.
  14. 05 Sep '10 08:22
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Reuben Fine's Basic Chess Endings is a really good book. Get the Benko Edition with algebraic notation.
    Fine's book is a classic, but it it more of a reference book than a book to be read from cover to cover. (Although anybody who read the whole thing and understood it all would probably be about 2600-strength in the endgame.)
  15. 06 Sep '10 13:15 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by gaychessplayer
    Fine's book is a classic, but it it more of a reference book than a book to be read from cover to cover. (Although anybody who read the whole thing and understood it all would probably be about 2600-strength in the endgame.)
    It is rather slow reading, but well written indeed. Probably a combination of books would be best. I love some of the ideas in the Devoretsky book, the Silman book and on and on. Reality is the endgame is a hardest part of chess and where even a small mistake can cost you dearly. So many books, so little time.