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  1. 16 Dec '06 20:30 / 1 edit
    I've been experimenting with this early bishop sacrifice, when you take your oppnent's f pawn with your bishop, forcing his king out and oprecenting him from castling. Does anyone have any experience with this move, and does it have a name?

    A recent example:

    Game 2816177
  2. Standard member Diet Coke
    Forum Vampire
    16 Dec '06 20:42
    Your one seemed to be.

    "Going a piece down for nothing.
  3. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    16 Dec '06 20:44
    Originally posted by Maltokimbooth
    I've been experimenting with this early bishop sacrifice, when you take your oppnent's f pawn with your bishop, forcing his king out and oprecenting him from castling. Does anyone have any experience with this move, and does it have a name?

    A recent example:

    Game 2816177
    I have actually tried this a couple of times, and I used to have a computer system that would also sacrifice for position, but as you saw in your game, it usually doesn't help in the end unless you can continue the pressure on the king; after he receives some protection its hard to regain any of the momentum...
  4. Subscriber LordofADown
    King of all Hills
    16 Dec '06 20:44
    I posted on this a while back and the general consensus was that if there were immediate attacks on the king after the sacrifice it would be worth it, otherwise it isn't.
    Check this guy out, it will tell you all about sac'ing for f7

    www.chesscafe.com/text/skittles249.pdf
  5. 16 Dec '06 22:54
    well, this current game is going much better as a result of the sacrifice.

    Game 2863423

    As you say, I think it worked because I developed the knight before hand. Also, he countered my threat to his king pawn with a threat to my bishop, not expecting my subsequent sacrifice and thereby leaving the king pawn unguarded.
  6. 16 Dec '06 23:26
    that move used to drive me nuts, the problem is once you've learnt to overcome it, you're a piece up, its quite easy to move the rook across and place the king next to it, and so almost ending up in a castling position; you never see a GM do the move, unless he has good back up, that tells you something
  7. 16 Dec '06 23:53
    Hey, I'm not claiming to be some grand master, I'm just talking it through. And in any event, I'm not playing at GM level, so whether a GM would or wouldn't do it isn't all that relevent. To be honest, having played this move to death now, I don't think I will use it in future, having seen how hard it can be to follow up.
  8. Donation !~TONY~!
    1...c5!
    17 Dec '06 00:14
    The problem with this Bishop sac is that White has absolutely no pieces developed, and therefore, no follow up. One thing to remember is that if you are down a piece, with nothing to show for it, you are lost. So in the first case Black used the time that you took developed your pieces to castle by hand, and by move 11, you were lost. Take this little bishop sac as a learning experience.
  9. Donation briancron
    nunquam perdo
    17 Dec '06 00:40
    Originally posted by Maltokimbooth
    Hey, I'm not claiming to be some grand master, I'm just talking it through. And in any event, I'm not playing at GM level, so whether a GM would or wouldn't do it isn't all that relevent. To be honest, having played this move to death now, I don't think I will use it in future, having seen how hard it can be to follow up.
    It's a good idea in general.

    You are drawing the king into the open and preventing him from castleing.

    However, you should support it first. If you have been sucessful with this attack then thank this thread for inspiring you to quit while you are ahead.

    If this type of game is to your style you should look up the "fried liver attack" It's a fine opening to learn and you must learn how to defend against it anyway.

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1238131

    What you have to keep in mind is that when you trade your bishop it's a trade. If you get less than you give it's a bad trade. In chess we call that poor compensation. It's more important against people who are good enough to make it matter.
  10. 17 Dec '06 01:48 / 1 edit
    exactly, black's king may seem vulnerable on f7, but if you have no pieces out to attack it, then black just artificially castles with Re8 (or Rf8, Rd8, etc.) and Kg8

    ...and the Fried Liver Attack rocks!