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  1. 23 Mar '12 10:40 / 7 edits
    Blackmar-Diemer Gambit. A RHP Nov 2010 game against who I think is a strong opponent. I am black.

  2. 23 Mar '12 11:04 / 3 edits
    Another RHP game against the same opponent. I am white and resigned early suffering a pseudo-smother mate.

    1.e4 c5
    2.Nf3 d6
    3.Bb5

  3. 23 Mar '12 20:55 / 1 edit
    In the first game, the bishops of opposite color endgame should've been a draw. Even after White sacrificed the bishop, he had a draw until the horrific blunder 50.a5. Kc4 forces a draw, since there's no way to prevent 51.Kb5 and 52. a5

    To prevent this, 49...Kd5 should give Black the win.
  4. 24 Mar '12 12:15
    I don't understand why people the Blackmar Diemer gambit. It is a totally useless hack Must be one of the few things that ever held back talent so much as skilled people insisting on playing this opening.
  5. 24 Mar '12 16:12 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by Golub
    I don't understand why people the Blackmar Diemer gambit. It is a totally useless hack Must be one of the few things that ever held back talent so much as skilled people insisting on playing this opening.
    When I researched it, the Blackmar Diemer gambit definitely has a strong fringe following, like many questionable openings, and they believed it the best thing since sliced bread. I can see how the Blackmar Diemer gambit could be interesting for white in blitz play, and even in OTB play where their black opponent is unfamiliar and gets into trouble.

    My opponent in the game above who played the BD gambit, and who has become a RHP friend and is a leader of one of my clans, is not a big fan of the gambit and thought it unsound. He commented that he played it against me because he had just recently come out of a BD thematic tournament, and was merely trying it out. Firmian of the MCO states regarding the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit:
    White immediately opens lines for his attack, wiping away any threats that the game will take on a slow, strategic, boring nature. The only problem is that the Blackmar-Diemer is not particularly good, so most players will wish to use it only in blitz games.
  6. 24 Mar '12 16:18 / 2 edits
    For those of you familiar with this gambit, what are a couple of key considerations for black to refute the gambit?

    Typical, White pushes f3 offering this as the gambit pawn. As black, I want to accept exf3, and then know how to refute the accepted gambit. Black to move.

  7. 24 Mar '12 16:25
    Originally posted by chesskid001
    In the first game, the bishops of opposite color endgame should've been a draw. Even after White sacrificed the bishop, he had a draw until the horrific blunder 50.a5. Kc4 forces a draw, since there's no way to prevent 51.Kb5 and 52. a5

    To prevent this, 49...Kd5 should give Black the win.
    You are right. That is a draw. What a gift he white gave me moving a5 instead of Kc4. Position below is a draw. Black to move.

  8. Standard member hedonist
    peacedog's keeper
    24 Mar '12 17:09
    Originally posted by moon1969
    For those of you familiar with this gambit, what are a couple of key considerations for black to refute the gambit?

    Typical, White pushes f3 offering this as the gambit pawn. As black, I want to accept exf3, and then know how to refute the accepted gambit. Black to move.

    [fen]rnbqkb1r/ppp1pppp/5n2/8/3Pp3/2N2P2/PPP3PP/R1BQKBNR b KQkq - 0 4[/fen]
    Well the e5 move puts you in endgame mode strate away. Not what a gambitter wants, I guess.
  9. 24 Mar '12 17:23
    Originally posted by moon1969
    You are right. That is a draw. What a gift he white gave me moving a5 instead of Kc4. Position below is a draw. Black to move.

    [fen]8/8/1p1b4/4k3/PPK5/8/8/8 w - - 5 50[/fen]
    As the player of the White pieces in the cited game, I wish I could recall what I was thinking when I played a5 instead of Kc4. It was certainly a terrible blunder.
  10. 24 Mar '12 22:04 / 5 edits
    Originally posted by Richard Laura
    As the player of the White pieces in the cited game, I wish I could recall what I was thinking when I played a5 instead of Kc4. It was certainly a terrible blunder.
    Richard it makes my win a little less satisfying. You earned that draw, and then just missed it at the end. I didn't even notice it until it was just pointed out. I vaguely remember thinking incorrectly in the game that my K would have position as our Ks were moving across the board at the end. But it was only your a5 move which allowed me to push my b-pawn to help secure the position.

    The intitial position after your bishop sac for my two passed connected pawns on the king-side. As black, I thoight I could then get my K over in time but evidently not. White to move.




    After moving our kings over a couple of moves, I did Bd6. Not sure why, but I am sure I had a reason. In the position below, maybe I should have done 49 . . . Kd5 instead of the 49 . . . Bd6 which I did. Does black Kd5 win below for black? Black to move.



    Edit: chesskid above points out Kd5 is a win for black, and thus black Bd6 offers the draw to white.
  11. 24 Mar '12 22:19
    Still wondering what are key actions for black to refute the Blackmar-Diemer gambit. Black to move.

  12. 24 Mar '12 22:23
    Originally posted by chesskid001
    To prevent this, 49...Kd5 should give Black the win.
    I just see the answer to my question about Kd5, you had already stated it before I ask it. I am not sure why as black I did 49 . . Bd6 instead of the 49 . . . Kd5.
  13. Standard member hunterknox
    Hopeless romantic
    24 Mar '12 23:14 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by moon1969
    Still wondering what are key actions for black to refute the Blackmar-Diemer gambit. Black to move.
    There aren't any. It's completely winning.

    Just kidding.

    I play the BDG as white but when I play against it I refuse the gambit with e3. e6 as black is usually a pretty solid follow up move if you want to accept the gambit.
  14. 25 Mar '12 02:31 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by hunterknox
    There aren't any. It's completely winning.

    Just kidding.

    I play the BDG as white but when I play against it I refuse the gambit with e3. e6 as black is usually a pretty solid follow up move if you want to accept the gambit.
    Firmian of the MCO says declining is a safe route for black, and with the main declining variation of black e6 "is safe, leaving white just faintly better."

    However, I do like to accept a gambit in most cases, and then refute it and win with the extra pawn (or maybe sometimes giving back the pawn to get a superior position). It is just gratifying to accept a gambit and win.
  15. 27 Mar '12 00:33
    I recall reading a book on the Scandinavian (which can transpose to the BDG via 1.e4 d5 2.d4) where the author recommended 1.e4 d5 2.d4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.f3 exf3 5.Nxf3 c6 as the most solid route for black.