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  1. 05 Feb '06 01:00
    By Sunil Weeramantry and Ed Eusebi

    9/10. An excelent book. Lots of diagrams (you don't need a board if you can visualize 4 turns) and explanations. He basically covers positional concepts by walking move by move through sample games (his and some GM's). He doesn't have games devoted to just one topic but 5 or 6 and constantly refers back to ideas he has covered before. My only gripe is that he only includes games he won. The most recent games are from 1991, but that hardly matters when teaching positional chess. I recommend this as an alternative to Silman's books (reading both would be even better though) at around 1300-1400 strength.
  2. 05 Feb '06 17:24
    Your gripe is completely unfounded. There are 2 or 3 games in there to which he admits that he lost. I'll find some now.

    The most prominent is the game in the chater "connect-the-dots." In this chapter the feature game is one which weeramantry lost, granted on time, but still a loss.

    The game in the chapter "It's never over" is one which Weeramantry drew.

    Even given the lack of a presence of games Weeramantry lost, it's still an excellent book. Besides, why should he include games that he lost? Games that he won are MUCH more instructive for him to talk about because he knows EXACTLY how he won and hwat he was thinking.
  3. 05 Feb '06 20:43
    Originally posted by razor2007
    Your gripe is completely unfounded. There are 2 or 3 games in there to which he admits that he lost. I'll find some now.
    If you notice the rating I gave the book, it's not much of a gripe it just would be interesting to see what his plans are like whne hes losing. Is he counterattacking, is he settling back and making it as difficult as possible for the opponent? Most importantly, Why did his plans fail?
  4. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    West Coast Represent
    06 Feb '06 22:34 / 1 edit
    I have that book. I give it a 4/10. I prefer books which give advice that isn't dependent on my following some specific game, which I hate to do. Such books include My System by Aaron Nimzowitch and The Middle Game in Chess by Znosko-Borovsky. Those are books I'd give a 9 or 10 out of 10 to.

    I read Best Lessons and learned almost nothing from it.
  5. 07 Feb '06 00:36
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    I have that book. I give it a 4/10. I prefer books which give advice that isn't dependent on my following some specific game, which I hate to do. Such books include My System by Aaron Nimzowitch and The Middle Game in Chess by Znosko-Borovsky. Those are books I'd give a 9 or 10 out of 10 to.

    I read Best Lessons and learned almost nothing from it.
    I have no clue how you come to this conclusion. It was recomended to me by all the players a know that are above Class A.

    He teaches you by following his games, but his lessons certainly aren't dependnt ont hem.
  6. 07 Feb '06 01:24
    Well, your recommendation hooked me. I've got the book on order (found it online for $2.00!), and can't wait to get it.