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  1. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    27 Nov '11 14:11
    http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=7703

    How does this kid do it? I can only remember one tournament in the last two years he's failed to win! Why oh why didn't he enter the World championship cycle? He's clearly the most consistent player.
  2. 27 Nov '11 20:48
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=7703

    How does this kid do it? I can only remember one tournament in the last two years he's failed to win! Why oh why didn't he enter the World championship cycle? He's clearly the most consistent player.
    He absolutely controlled Nakamura. I'm rather sure this Ian N. is also going to be very strong in the up and coming. He played some daring chess. I thought the biggest let down was Kramnik.

    Q
  3. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    27 Nov '11 23:07
    Originally posted by PhySiQ
    He absolutely controlled Nakamura. I'm rather sure this Ian N. is also going to be very strong in the up and coming. He played some daring chess. I thought the biggest let down was Kramnik.

    Q
    I agree, Nepomniatchi has been improving steadily over the last year or so. You can definitely see a new generation of players rising into the top 20 this year. Giri will be a real force in a year or two and the Vitnamese player Le Quang Liem looks VERY strong to me. I think he will be a potential World championship contender in a couple of years if he keeps improving at the rate he has been..
  4. 28 Nov '11 00:04
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    I agree, Nepomniatchi has been improving steadily over the last year or so. You can definitely see a new generation of players rising into the top 20 this year. Giri will be a real force in a year or two and the Vitnamese player Le Quang Liem looks VERY strong to me. I think he will be a potential World championship contender in a couple of years if he keeps improving at the rate he has been..
    right, Anish is looking good. The problem for everyone at the moment is that Carlsen hasn't stopped developing either. He's still young and has done nothing but get stronger and more confident. Levon played with some great confidence, but I think he's riding momentum that will slow. Peter Svidler was also a bit under par to me, prior to his Kramnik win.

    Anand just limped along.

    Q
  5. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    28 Nov '11 00:49
    Originally posted by PhySiQ
    right, Anish is looking good. The problem for everyone at the moment is that Carlsen hasn't stopped developing either. He's still young and has done nothing but get stronger and more confident. Levon played with some great confidence, but I think he's riding momentum that will slow. Peter Svidler was also a bit under par to me, prior to his Kramnik win.

    Anand just limped along.

    Q
    I don't know if i agree about Aronian, he has improved steadily for the last few years and i see no reason why that should change. I think his opening play could be a little more diverse, he tends to stick to a certain repertoire. Carlsen on the other hand plays everything! I think Karjakin will develop into a serious contender for World no1 once he finishes university (along with Nepomiachtchi, i believe they attend the same University!)
  6. 28 Nov '11 09:02 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    I don't know if i agree about Aronian, he has improved steadily for the last few years and i see no reason why that should change. I think his opening play could be a little more diverse, he tends to stick to a certain repertoire. Carlsen on the other hand plays everything! I think Karjakin will develop into a serious contender for World no1 once he finishes university (along with Nepomiachtchi, i believe they attend the same University!)
    As far as your disagreement about Aronian, that is each of our opinions and only time will tell. However saying that Aronian needs diversity, while celebrating Carlsen's seems very odd to me. Magnus has a rather tight repertoire which includes the QID and Nimzo, and the Sicilian (typically the dragon) is basically his favorite, and these are his almost exclusive weapons.

    Carlsen's system is heavy on wing play. If you pay attention to his QID and Nimzo often transpose into the same basic idea's and his pet dragon is unshakable but rather predictable. The Carlsen system in my mind is the best example of hypermodern play. Perhaps even to the point of calling him post-modern. His reincarnation of Ba6 in the QID is a great example. He is a virtuoso of his system-much like Kasparov's Taimanov/Najdorf and occasional Grunfeld...Carlsen has a Dragon and QID/Nimzo weaponset. These openings are favorites to each of these players but do not detract from his ability to play any opening soundly. Carlsen is a tough egg to crack. I would not blame that on his opening play. Carlsen is a monster after the opening. It's his creativity that makes him unbeatable.

    Q
  7. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    28 Nov '11 09:11
    Originally posted by PhySiQ
    It's his creativity that makes him unbeatable.

    Or his mentor's and coach, in the sidelines.

    -m.
  8. 28 Nov '11 09:20
    Originally posted by mikelom
    Or his mentor's and coach, in the sidelines.

    -m.
    An undeniable factor.

    Q
  9. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    28 Nov '11 12:18
    Originally posted by PhySiQ
    As far as your disagreement about Aronian, that is each of our opinions and only time will tell. However saying that Aronian needs diversity, while celebrating Carlsen's seems very odd to me. Magnus has a rather tight repertoire which includes the QID and Nimzo, and the Sicilian (typically the dragon) is basically his favorite, and these are his almost excl ...[text shortened]... arlsen is a monster after the opening. It's his creativity that makes him unbeatable.

    Q
    What about his ruy Lopez? Or the Berlin as black, or the philidor (against Caruana) Kings Gambit (against Wang Yu). Have a look as his opening play in Nanjing 2009, he doesn't play an opening twice in that tournament. While i agree that he does have favourite openings (when playing the really top players, Anand, Aronian, Kramnik) he does tend to stick to openings like you mentioned, but against the lower order he experiments a lot more than most of the top 10. I'd say only Ivanchuk and Nakamura can claim to be as experimental. I think it is this diversity that picks him up so many points in tournaments these days. It's very difficult for people to prepare for him as on any given day he can play e4/d4/c4 or Nf3, depending on his mood...
  10. 29 Nov '11 07:08
    Hell jeah!A Norwegian fighther. Dunno. Crosscountry skiing?! At least it is supposed to be good for your body. Read in the newspaper this morning about our big swedish skimaster "Mora-Nisse" one of the all time greatest. Lives at a home for elder people, Nils Karlsson is now 97 years old, still very vital. (Yea perhaps another subject. But a fun read it was.). Swedish national gold medalist 37 times according to wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nils_Karlsson
  11. 29 Nov '11 07:20
    Originally posted by squirrel0like0nuts
    Hell jeah!A Norwegian fighther. Dunno. Crosscountry skiing?! At least it is supposed to be good for your body. Read in the newspaper this morning about our big swedish skimaster "Mora-Nisse" one of the all time greatest. Lives at a home for elder people, Nils Karlsson is now 97 years old, still very vital. (Yea perhaps another subject. But a fun r ...[text shortened]... onal gold medalist 37 times according to wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nils_Karlsson
    Extra.
    http://www.dn.se/sport/i-morfars-spar---for-framtids-segrar