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  1. Standard member beauroberts
    Father of Three
    09 Feb '14 18:38 / 1 edit
    I really do want to get better, but my mind doesn't seem to grasp the deeper strategy of chess...the concepts behind openings...traps...forks...pins...mid game or end game. I know how the pieces move, but still consider myself a beginner or novice at best. I have tried videos and books but the concepts escape me. Face to face or at the very least one on one online may be my last hope. I have been considering getting a face to face personal chess teacher to help me learn these things.

    What is your experience with this? What is the going rate for someone like this? I'm not sure what my OTB rating is but on here I seem to fluctuate between 800-1200. What reasonable results can I expect to get? How often should I study with this teacher to get results? I would ideally like to learn a whole bunch prior to entering tournaments OTB to make full use of my p rated games...not sure if class C or B is out of the realm of possibility.

    I am more than willing to learn from anyone who is willing to teach me...unrated move by move or otherwise...starting with a review of chess notation...

    I am 33 and live in Milford, New Hampshire if this helps narrow down the info I am looking for.

    Is a personal chess instructor worth it and how much is the going rate?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Beau
  2. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    09 Feb '14 20:58
    Originally posted by beauroberts
    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Beau
    I think you should help yourself first!

    1. Learn one white opening; Ruy Lopez or Giucco Piano
    and by "learn" I just mean get to know the feel of these, make sure
    you know the first 6 moves and why they are played.
    (Remember that you can refer to opening theory during a game!!)

    2. Stop playing g3 in every game!

    3. Don't resign when a piece down. The level at which you are playing at will see your opponents blunder too.

    4. Flip the board occasionally. What will your opponents next move be?
  3. 09 Feb '14 22:21
    We used to have an instructor who posted regularly on here.
    He was also an expert on chess psychology.
    His second coming may be of help to you.
  4. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    09 Feb '14 23:03
    See if there is a local chess club. Hang out, make friends, then get pointers for free. And that is really the best way to learn. Players here are also helpful. Sometimes we can be a bit blunt, but chess is sort of a cruel world. 🙂 Wanting to improve is a first step. Good luck, send a game anytime, I'd be glad to help explain what I'm thinking, or aiming towards. 🙂
  5. Standard member caissad4
    Child of the Novelty
    10 Feb '14 00:19
    I have been a chess instructor since the mid 1970's and have taught players from beginner to master. First you need to learn basic principles (control of the center, proper development, basic weaknesses to avoid). There are many books available that show these things. Paying an instructor to learn things that you can learn thru your own efforts is a waste of your money. Then you move on to your openings. Find ones which you feel most comfortable with and play many games with these openings against many levels of players. Do not be discouraged by repeated failures but search for your mistakes in them. Ask the player who just crushed you what you could have done better. Don't be afraid to change your openings. Initially only learn a few lines. Look for the underlying ideas in these openings and how they develop into a middle game plan. Read a book on endings. One that deals with general ideas rather than tons of specific analysis. Paul Keres wrote such a book many years ago.
    After 3 or 4 months of this you will probably be ready for an instructor. Expect to pay from $25 to $50 per hour for good teachers.
  6. Standard member RBHILL
    Acts 13:48
    10 Feb '14 20:09
    Originally posted by beauroberts
    I really do want to get better, but my mind doesn't seem to grasp the deeper strategy of chess...the concepts behind openings...traps...forks...pins...mid game or end game. I know how the pieces move, but still consider myself a beginner or novice at best. I have tried videos and books but the concepts escape me. Face to face or at the very least one on ...[text shortened]... uctor worth it and how much is the going rate?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Beau
    I would say yes. But you would have to keep studing and learning. It also depends on who you have too as your instuctor.
  7. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    11 Feb '14 05:03
    Originally posted by caissad4
    I have been a chess instructor since the mid 1970's and have taught players from beginner to master. First you need to learn basic principles (control of the center, proper development, basic weaknesses to avoid). There are many books available that show these things. Paying an instructor to learn things that you can learn thru your own efforts is a waste o ...[text shortened]... l probably be ready for an instructor. Expect to pay from $25 to $50 per hour for good teachers.
    I agree...there is a massive amount of instruction (much of it free) available to you. Start with You Tube, lot's of good lessons there, also some level 1 and 2 tactics books would be a big help. As far as openings go, try to learn a little about all the openings, and a lot about the one's you want to specialize in. (...and be patitent with yourself, Rome was not built in a day!)🙂
  8. Standard member jarrasch
    NeighborhoodChampion
    11 Feb '14 10:58
    Hello everyone,

    as I have started learning chess as an adult and I intend to take private tutoring as well, let me put my 5 cents into the discussion:

    1. if you have limited time available for training, it seems worthy to have a tutor (if you can afford it) - probably 1 hour of tutoring is much more effective than 1 hour of self-study

    2. there is so much instructional chess material available, that we are flooded with it. Chess instructor will provide you with some training plan/study regimen and try to enforce it so that you can focus on studying rather than looking for another great book/video/software/magic shortcut/holy grail 😉

    3. private tutoring will introduce regularity and helps you keep motivation

    Of course, if you have a lot of free time and strong character/motivation or you just play for fun, enjoying playing chess and not caring about improvement, then you don't need a tutor.

    Do you agree?
    I count on your opinions and further pros/cons of having a chess tutor.

    jarrasch
  9. Standard member beauroberts
    Father of Three
    12 Feb '14 02:53 / 1 edit
    I agree 1 hour with a private tutor is better than 1 hour self study...but I also agree that I have not fully realized my own un-tutored potential. I can study and spend some time reading about basic principals and such...being a novice at best sometimes the books escape me...but perhaps chess for dummies or some of the easier books that have been pointed out will help me...Also some youtube videos will help me maximize my own playing for free or very little out of pocket expense...once I do that then I will be ready for 1 on 1 private instruction...a side note I have about 8-10 hours per week for self-study/playing/private tutoring...I can't say that money isn't a factor, but I am doing far better now than ever before and may be able to support up 4-5 hours of private instruction per week at $25-$50 per hour...that would give me 4-5 hours of focused self study to work on what my teacher has for me...

    1. What books for beginners are better than others.
    2. What videos for beginners are better than others.
    3. How do I find the right teacher for me. Is there a database of good chess teachers.
    4. What level of chess teacher should I study with. Should I stagger it and study with a 1600 level player and pay less learn all I can from them then move up to 1800 and so on or should I study with the 2000+ player the entire time.

    Any thoughts...Thanks for all your help...I am already getting better just slowing down and taking my time...though I am still missing obvious moves check this game out for more details 7.) I should have taken his queen with my knight checking his king instead I missed it and took his bishop? Game 10470352
  10. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    12 Feb '14 14:22
    One thing that will help you a lot is to do regular tactics training. By solving puzzles you are forced to find the BEST move. This site is free and has helped me improve a lot...

    www.chesstempo.com
  11. 13 Feb '14 00:09 / 3 edits
    1 hour of self study vs 1 hour of lesson.

    I suppose the debate is also if the instructor knows your level.
    So on your first lesson you might spend 10 - 15 minutes figuring out where your at.

    Grandmasters the majority of there work was self taught from books. But they all had help to reach the top.

    If you find your weakest point in the game and keep fixing that the weak point will move around from end game to middle game back to the opening.

    FORCE YOU WAY THROUGH A BOOK ONE BOOK

    You will of had 60 lessons from a teacher by then from the book.

    Chances are you want to be better but will not put the work in. (its hard)

    So I hope to see across the board from me. I put the work in lol
  12. 13 Feb '14 03:25
    You don't need a private instructor. Don't go for it. Waste of money.

    Pay attention to your moves.

    Two rules: 1. After you opponent makes a move, ask what is he threatening. 2nd. when making a move, ask yourself if the move is safe?

    Rinse. Repeat. Make them your 6th sense.