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  1. 18 Sep '10 23:41
    What chess swag do you have? Back in 04 During the Leko/Kramnik Match held in Switzerland
    They offered the online audience paticipation in a chess trivia game and I won a signed chess board/set smaller set but made of wood nice. there were some nicer prizes as well, but thought at the time that it was fun to join in and of course winning something was cool
  2. 19 Sep '10 00:55
    I have loads of booty, books signed by GM's dedicated to me
    with Corner gags in them, signed score sheets, cups, medals, prizes,
    all sorts of stuff given to me or I've stuff I've begged or bought over the years.

    (when Karpov signed the Edinburgh chess club's visitors book I tried
    to nick his pen.)

    But the prize is a an old genuine Staunton Set in a genuine Staunton
    pre WWI box which I know for sure that Alkhine once played a game on
    (it was simul ).

    A genuine Stauton set has a King stamped on the forehead of a Knight
    and on the top of a Rook so you can tell which is the Kings' Knight
    and which is the King's Rook.

    Here is a picture of what it should look like on the Knight.

    http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2151/2162218062_5d16b0da56.jpg

    I hardly use it as it means me getting out my large wooden board.
    You do not use a genuine Staunton set on a standard roll board.

    So if anyone does not have a proper chess set then PM me and
    I'll send it to them free of charge. I'm bored with it.

    Nah on second thoughts I may keep it. Sorry.

    What were the triva questions?
  3. 19 Sep '10 01:31
    love the items w/ true provenance.
    I would love an old jaques set especially one played by a master
  4. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    19 Sep '10 03:18 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by jbaca
    What chess swag do you have? Back in 04 During the Leko/Kramnik Match held in Switzerland
    They offered the online audience paticipation in a chess trivia game and I won a signed chess board/set smaller set but made of wood nice. there were some nicer prizes as well, but thought at the time that it was fun to join in and of course winning something was cool
    Karpov signed a copy of his Best Games book for me back in the 1990's.

    I also won a copy of Korchnoi's Best Games in an annotations contest for the Virginia Chess Federation newsletter back in the 1990's.

    And I'm trying hard to suck up to GP so he'll put me in his will!
  5. 19 Sep '10 14:54
    I also have a chess mag that was owned by Fishcer but a bobblehead would be .....
  6. 19 Sep '10 22:05
    "And I'm trying hard to suck up to GP so he'll put me in his will."

    Think I'll leave one piece each to 32 different people.

    They then can start buying or swindling the bits of each other
    to see who ends up with the complete set.

    (a good short story in there somewhere.)
  7. 19 Sep '10 22:12
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    "And I'm trying hard to suck up to GP so he'll put me in his will."

    Think I'll leave one piece each to 32 different people.

    They then can start buying or swindling the bits of each other
    to see who ends up with the complete set.

    (a good short story in there somewhere.)
    There's a switch for you: thirty one coins and one real chess piece. 🙂
  8. 20 Sep '10 00:11 / 3 edits
    Coins....I don't get it ??

    The short story.

    The 32 guys get a piece each.

    4 of the 32 decided to start buying the single pieces from the other lads.

    Soon four of them end up with 8 pieces each.

    (there is your title 'Pieces of Eight'😉.

    They decide to meet up on a remote island mansion and
    the pieces are all re-united on a board. The complete set.

    So they need a way to decide who gets the set.

    Bidding for money would be unfair as one lad is very rich.

    So what do they bid with?

    Toes. The person who bids to lose the most toes gets the set.

    They agree on this. A hammer and chisel are laid on the table.

    They take off their socks and one grinning guy has 6 toes on each foot!
  9. 20 Sep '10 00:48
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Coins....I don't get it ??

    The short story.

    The 32 guys get a piece each.

    4 of the 32 decided to start buying the single pieces from the other lads.

    Soon four of them end up with 8 pieces each.

    (there is your title 'Pieces of Eight'😉.

    They decide to meet up on a remote island mansion and
    the pieces are all re-united on a board. The com ...[text shortened]... laid on the table.

    They take off their socks and one grinning guy has 6 toes on each foot!
    Not too long ago, you talked about sacrificing a coin on f7. The set was incomplete, so you guys used a coin. I was referring to that.
    In this case, 31 of the pieces will be the coins, and only one will be the actual chess piece (if you send one piece to each person).
  10. 20 Sep '10 01:10 / 1 edit
    Ah........the Chessville rant.

    I wondered where you were coming from.

    http://www.chessville.com/GC/index.htm

    I've also castled with a matchbox, that was at a University club
    when they had three teams turn up on the same night.

    So, how many toes are you bidding? I collect toes.
  11. 20 Sep '10 01:28 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Ah........the Chessville rant.

    I wondered where you were coming from/

    I've also castled with a matchbox, that was at a University club
    when they had three teams turn up on the same night.

    So, how many toes are you bidding? I collect toes.
    I have 13 cats. How many toes does a cat have?

    Back to the new London System book (from another thread) ...

    Has old Greenpawn seen this?



    It's an Albin reversed! There is one kink in my book though. The author doesn't bother to look at g6 systems (in the Albin reversed). 🙁
  12. 20 Sep '10 02:07
    "The author doesn't bother to look at g6 systems (in the Albin reversed)."

    What! the g6 variation of the Alpin reversed is critical to the
    future of chess. What an omission.

    Every opening book should have at least two paged dedicated
    to the g6 system of the Albin Reversed.

    Buy as many copies of this book as you can to stop them from falling
    into the hands of those who would harm chess.

    Send me the authors address, I'll go round there and chop off his toes.

    In the moves you posted Black not play 3...dxe5 but 3...e6



    French Defence with the London Bishop (as usual) on the wrong square.

    If on your 2nd move you place a Bishop on f4 then you will spend your
    whole opening trying to justify it.

    Chess is easy, you know where you Knights are going, c3 & f3 and in
    QP openings the f1 Bishop goes to d3, then you can castle.

    Why are you making it hard for yourself and giving Black an equal postion
    after two moves. Why? Don't you like the white pieces?

    Put that thing on ebay and use the money to buy toys for the 13 cats.
  13. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    20 Sep '10 02:19
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    "The author doesn't bother to look at g6 systems (in the Albin reversed)."

    What! the g6 variation of the Alpin reversed is critical to the
    future of chess. What an omission.

    Every opening book should have at least two paged dedicated
    to the g6 system of the Albin Reversed.

    Buy as many copies of this book as you can to stop them from falling ...[text shortened]... the white pieces?

    Put that thing on ebay and use the money to buy toys for the 13 cats.
    I've been experimenting with Kovacevic's 2. Bf4 move order, and only about 1/3 of the games actually end up being a recognizable London System.

    Very often black responds as though he's expecting a London (a reasonable assumption), but white still has the option of playing c4, and I have been finding myself in favorable "Slavs-and-QGDs with Bf4"-type systems.

    I really think Kovacevic's idea is larger than the London System, and the name does it an injustice. It's really a move order plan that allows white to play a variety of openings and plans, of which the London is only one arrow in the quiver. It sounds like Lakdawala's book has a similar idea.

    As an aside, I've been a fan of IM Lakdawala's for some time, and I have followed him from the opposite coast (he's a California guy). I think he's one of those American IM-types who would have made it to GM if he had bothered to travel to get FIDE norms.

    Sometimes we chess players get caught up in the nomenclature, and want to superficially classify ideas and games into tidy categories and folders, but the game refuses to be pigeonholed.
  14. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    20 Sep '10 03:08
    I have scoresheets signed by Petrosian, Christiansen, and Browne.
  15. 20 Sep '10 03:09
    Paul do not follow California guys who cannot be bothered to get GM norms.

    Follow Russian GM's who have been bothered to get their GM norms.

    Stick that book on ebay and use the money to send the 13 cats to
    that guy in California.