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  1. 15 Nov '11 18:02
    What does that mean?

    It seems to me that it means: "you just blundered the game away and I won"

    Sometimes I see people say gg after what actually was a good game, but most of the time it is the winner who says that after winning.

    If I win because the other person blundered I won't reply gg, but will comment on how I make similar blunders. I can't say good game because it wasn't. It was a game decided by a blatant blunder.


    Just blundered a game in blitz, the guy said gg, that's why I started the thread now. It's been something bugging me for a while, but at the moment it is fresh in my mind.
  2. Standard member Wildfire
    Force of Nature
    15 Nov '11 18:13
    Originally posted by Eladar
    What does that mean?

    It seems to me that it means: "you just blundered the game away and I won"

    Sometimes I see people say gg after what actually was a good game, but most of the time it is the winner who says that after winning.

    If I win because the other person blundered I won't reply gg, but will comment on how I make similar blunders. I can't ...[text shortened]... w. It's been something bugging me for a while, but at the moment it is fresh in my mind.
    You're reading too much into it.

    For me, it's just a matter of politeness. I always say good game at the end of every game I play, regardless of the outcome. Every game can be a good game, even if you or your opponent blundered, because learning has occurred.
  3. 15 Nov '11 18:15
    I use it as the equivalent of shaking hands after a Tennis match. Doesn't have to have been the best game of chess ever, just a polite thing to do and to sign off from your opponent. If it was more of a thriller, then I would be more inclined to chat a bit more with the opponent.
    That said, there is something smug about an inappropriate 'gg', so I know what you mean.
  4. 15 Nov '11 18:17 / 1 edit
    i also regard 'gg' as something rather polite. it is short for 'thanks for the game, see you another time maybe'. certainly i like this much more then people just disconnecting after they blundered.

    edit: that 'shake hands after tennis' is good analogy...
  5. 15 Nov '11 18:28
    In the videogame community it's just a sign of respect. I play a lot of StarCraft and everyone says 'gg' instead of just leaving right away.
  6. 15 Nov '11 18:28 / 2 edits
    I never saw the point of saying 'GG' to a game that wasn't, especially not blizt blunder games. Then yes, it has that mockery tinge. I would rather say "thanks for the game", which is a completely different thing to say (given that you actually do want to thank your opponent)..

    Now it's different if the game was actually fierce and you end up saying "great game". To me that's a pretty high reward to a game that you only utter out of great respect with a slight passion and awe. Sort of like a good whiskey. Nobody forces you to say it's a great whiskey about a jameson, so there simply is not reason to do it. You can save it for the time you actually stumble upon the fiddich. The "routine GG"? McDonalds..

    I wouldn't drag chess in the dirt either by comparing it with some MMORPG online games.. that's a different GG imho.

    Having a trigger in your chess client to automatically say "good game" after you finish is the worst crime possible - a true sign of disrespect to the game and the opponent.. I'd even dislike if somone automatically wrote "thanks for the game" with a script...
  7. 15 Nov '11 23:06
    Originally posted by Golub
    I never saw the point of saying 'GG' to a game that wasn't, especially not blizt blunder games. Then yes, it has that mockery tinge. I would rather say "thanks for the game", which is a completely different thing to say (given that you actually do want to thank your opponent)...
    I concur, and I am pleased that someone else prefers to think before speaking.
    The automatic 'Good game!' comment ignores (or disrespects) the game's content.
    I prefer to avoid such mindless, sometimes insincere, social exchanges.

    I might say 'Good game!' when the game has been well-played by both sides.
    I should consider it inappropriate to say 'Good game!' to a player who has lost
    a clearly winning position on account of an 'obvious' blunder on the last move.
    If you asked a person who obviously was suffering from a terminal illness,
    'How are you?', would you expect an instant reply of, 'Just fine, thank you.'?

    I always have said, 'Thanks for the game', unless my opponent was too abusive
    (such as by repeatedly sending abusive personal messages) during the game.
  8. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    15 Nov '11 23:40
    Thanks for the game might be a poor choice if your opponent just blundered it to you....

    I prefer - "handshake."

    Hard to misinterpret that.
  9. 15 Nov '11 23:44
    Originally posted by nimzo5
    Thanks for the game might be a poor choice if your opponent just blundered it to you....

    I prefer - "handshake."

    Hard to misinterpret that.
    Would 'thanks for the game' mean just 'thanks for playing the game with me'
    or 'thanks for playing the game badly enough for me to win'? 🙂
  10. 16 Nov '11 00:18
    Originally posted by nimzo5
    Thanks for the game might be a poor choice if your opponent just blundered it to you....

    I prefer - "handshake."

    Hard to misinterpret that.
    I agree with this. I find "good game" and the like particularly annoying after I just blundered. Most of the time, its clear folks are just trying to be polite, but every once in a while, it seems sarcastic. I'm better with "Thanks for the game", but you're absolutely right that "handshake" is even tougher to misinterpret.
  11. 16 Nov '11 02:18 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Erekose
    I agree with this. I find "good game" and the like particularly annoying after I just blundered. Most of the time, its clear folks are just trying to be polite, but every once in a while, it seems sarcastic. I'm better with "Thanks for the game", but you're absolutely right that "handshake" is even tougher to misinterpret.
    Could the offer of a 'handshake' be misinterpreted?

    A possibility that I can foresee would be in the case of a player who's
    from a culture wherein shaking hands is not a normal ritual of greeting.
    Or the unseeing offer of a 'handshake' might unintentionally annoy a person
    who was born without or who has lost (through injury) the use of one's hands.
    In real life, no well-meaning person should offer a 'handshake' to someone
    who obviously was physically incapable of shaking hands.
  12. 16 Nov '11 02:33
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Could the offer of a 'handshake' be misinterpreted?

    A possibility that I can foresee would be in the case of a player who's
    from a culture wherein shaking hands is not a normal ritual of greeting.
    Or the unseeing offer of a 'handshake' might unintentionally annoy a person
    who was born without or who has lost (through injury) the use of one's hands.
    ...[text shortened]... offer a 'handshake' to someone
    who obviously was physically incapable of shaking hands.
    I'm sure its possible - from what I can tell, there's no human interaction that can't be mis-interpreted. And without seeing someone's body lanaguage, it's even easier.
  13. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    16 Nov '11 02:43 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Eladar
    What does that mean?

    It seems to me that it means: "you just blundered the game away and I won"

    Sometimes I see people say gg after what actually was a good game, but most of the time it is the winner who says that after winning.

    If I win because the other person blundered I won't reply gg, but will comment on how I make similar blunders. I can't w. It's been something bugging me for a while, but at the moment it is fresh in my mind.
    It's a gesture of sportsmanship.
  14. Donation mwmiller
    RHP Member No.16
    16 Nov '11 11:19
    Originally posted by ChessPraxis
    It's a gesture of sportsmanship.
    I agree!

    It's the same when someone says "GOOD LUCK!" at the start of a game. It probably doesn't mean they are arrogant and think you will need luck to win. It's usully just a friendly expression used when someone feels the need to say something.

    I'm sure "GOOD GAME" falls into a similar category.
  15. Subscriber davaniel
    1.Nf3
    16 Nov '11 14:37
    It reminds me of a certain politeness in daily life in the UK which I notice every time I visit. If, for instance, you accidentally bump into someone in a rather busy street, people are inclined to both (!) just say 'Sorry' and move on.

    Sometimes if you try that in Holland you get very ugly looks. I've tried to apply the 'sorry' technique regardless of whose fault it was or if it was anybody's fault at all, and I like it.

    In a way saying 'sorry' without actually meaning to say that you're apologizing for something that's your fault feels somewhat similar to just politely saying 'gg' after a game that wasn't necessarily good.