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  1. 12 Jun '13 17:22
    I am teaching chess to my 4 year old. He is able to setup the board, and recognizes the pieces by name. Now, I want to teach him the movement of various pieces. Looking for some suggestions for explaining the concept of diagonal (understands the concept of square) and the movement of bishop?

    Currently, after setting up the board we just play by moving pieces, and I tell him how the pieces move and capture.
  2. Standard member vivify
    rain
    12 Jun '13 17:30
    Does your son know how to play checkers? Because that should help with understand diagonals and the bishop.
  3. Standard member byedidia
    Mister Why
    13 Jun '13 03:44
    Give him some time. He may not be ready. There are bunches of developmental milestones that happen around 4-5 years old, some of them relating to spatial abilities. They are almost like switches that turn on in the brain. Most 4 year olds have some serious problems with bishops and knights, but suddenly one day they get it. There's no point in pushing it too early. Try again in a few months. You don't want to frustrate the little bugger.
  4. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    13 Jun '13 04:14
    Originally posted by vishyanand
    I am teaching chess to my 4 year old. He is able to setup the board, and recognizes the pieces by name. Now, I want to teach him the movement of various pieces. Looking for some suggestions for explaining the concept of diagonal (understands the concept of square) and the movement of bishop?

    Currently, after setting up the board we just play by moving pieces, and I tell him how the pieces move and capture.
    Don't do it!! The kid will end up with a dead end job, a nagging wife, and playing online to escape his troubles.
  5. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    13 Jun '13 07:22
    A good way to start is to set up the board with just the pawns. Make it a game to see if he can get a pawn to the other side of the board. Once he can handle the pawns, add the pieces one at a time so he can get used to using them at a slow pace. Good luck explaining checkmate/stalemate!
  6. 13 Jun '13 10:24
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    A good way to start is to set up the board with just the pawns. Make it a game to see if he can get a pawn to the other side of the board. Once he can handle the pawns, add the pieces one at a time so he can get used to using them at a slow pace. Good luck explaining checkmate/stalemate!
    Good suggestion!
  7. 13 Jun '13 10:27
    Originally posted by byedidia
    Give him some time. He may not be ready. There are bunches of developmental milestones that happen around 4-5 years old, some of them relating to spatial abilities. They are almost like switches that turn on in the brain. Most 4 year olds have some serious problems with bishops and knights, but suddenly one day they get it. There's no point in pushing it too early. Try again in a few months. You don't want to frustrate the little bugger.
    You are right. I have avoided pushing him. In fact, when we was much younger he used to just throw the pieces , but suddenly one day, he was calm and decided to setup the chessboard. So, for now just setting up board gives him satisfaction and playing out (copying my moves )
  8. 13 Jun '13 10:28
    Originally posted by vivify
    Does your son know how to play checkers? Because that should help with understand diagonals and the bishop.
    Has not yet played checkers.
  9. Donation ketchuplover
    G.O.A.T.
    13 Jun '13 13:48
    Please let us know when he beats a local master. Thanks.
  10. 13 Jun '13 14:09 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by ChessPraxis
    Don't do it!! The kid will end up with a dead end job, a nagging wife, and playing online to escape his troubles.


    CP is right. and...

    "Good luck explaining checkmate/stalemate!"

    Wait till he asks about en Passaant, castling, weak pawns, isolated pawns,
    doubled pawns and a greenpawn.

    "Dad why do your swear everytime someone mentions a greenpawn."

    --------

    Taught my kids & grandkids using methods like this for all pieces.


    Take the pawn in two moves. (2 ways)

    Do this a few times then progress to:


    You must capture both pawns in 4 moves.

    There are dozens of chess for children books out there.
    You could use one of these or this site:

    http://www.chesskid.com/?m=chesskids

    ...it's one of the best chess sites on the net put together by a lad
    who has had years and years of experience teaching kids.

    Go there, click on on Learn and do the ego boosting puzzles
    for an idea of the layout and the format.

    I often pop in for a look, or an idea.
    In the articles section I just came across this one.....
    ...OK it's a bit more advanced, don't let this put your off, there
    are some real easy ones, but it's very instructive....

    ...Think I'll drop it inro a new thread.
  11. Standard member vivify
    rain
    14 Jun '13 14:04
    Maybe it would be good to start with that game. It's much simpler, and will get him thinking about positions, tactics and diagonals.

    There also many similarities: both games have 64 squares, a "king", and the idea of promoting a piece when you get your piece to the end of the board. A king in checkers move like a bishop in chess; that should get him used to the value of a bishop, and he'll learn to fork pieces with his "kinged' checker piece.
  12. 14 Jun '13 14:10
    Hello viv,

    I think a checkers board has 10x10 squares.
  13. 14 Jun '13 14:27 / 1 edit
    Forget Draughts/Checkers.

    This is a Chess site.
    If someone asked how do I get good at basketball you would not say
    play snooker, that may help.

    By this twisted logic to learn Checkers you must first learn Chess.

    Checkers is played on 32 squares, the 32 dark squares.
    Do you want the kid to through his chess life getting mated on the light squares.

    Is that what you want?
    Is that what you really want?
    Because that's what will happen.

    What to do now the [Chess] season is finished."

    (we played checkers..)

    http://www.chessedinburgh.co.uk/chandlerarticle.php?ChandID=39
  14. Standard member vivify
    rain
    14 Jun '13 16:55
    Originally posted by tvochess
    Hello viv,

    I think a checkers board has 10x10 squares.
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/checkerboard


    check·er·board
    noun \-ˌbȯrd\

    Definition of CHECKERBOARD

    1

    : a board used in various games (as checkers) with usually 64 squares in 2 alternating colors
  15. Standard member vivify
    rain
    14 Jun '13 16:57 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Forget Draughts/Checkers.

    This is a [b]Chess
    site.
    If someone asked how do I get good at basketball you would not say
    play snooker, that may help.

    By this twisted logic to learn Checkers you must first learn Chess.

    Checkers is played on 32 squares, the 32 dark squares.
    Do you want the kid to through his chess life getting mated on the li b]

    (we played checkers..)

    http://www.chessedinburgh.co.uk/chandlerarticle.php?ChandID=39[/b]
    Didn't say it was a "must" to learn chess, but a "help". Remember, we're talking about a 4 year old; and the question was specifically about diagonals, which checkers is all about.