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  1. 24 Jan '14 06:53
    Hello.

    I have a premium membership on Playchess, and so I get to participate in a simul against a GM approximately once each month, and another simul against an IM approximately once each month too. The time control is 7 minutes + 15 seconds per move if I'm not mistaken.

    So I just wanted to know how should I play if I want to win against the GM and the IM? And let me make it clear: I want to win, not draw.

    Should I play sharp openings? Or should I continue to use my quiet and positional opening repertoire?
    Should I move fast so that the GM's clock runs out fast and he makes a blunder in time pressure? Should I move faster than usual just in the opening?
    Should I premove obvious recaptures or not? (maybe if I don't premove the GM will switch to another game and so lose a little more time on my game)
    Should I sandbag my rating so that the GM thinks I'm just a complete patzer and tries to play cheap tricks on me that will backfire?
    Should I try to play risky and unclear moves that result in very complicated positions? (this is not really my style, I like familiar, calm and normal positions) Should I try to play some cheap tricks on the GM?

    Thanks in advance for your answers.
  2. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    24 Jan '14 07:01 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Marc Benford
    Hello.

    I have a premium membership on Playchess, and so I get to participate in a simul against a GM approximately once each month, and another simul against an IM approximately once each month too. The time control is 7 minutes + 15 seconds per move if I'm not mistaken.

    So I just wanted to know how should I play if I want to win against the GM an ...[text shortened]... itions) Should I try to play some cheap tricks on the GM?

    Thanks in advance for your answers.
    Play good moves and have fun. πŸ˜• πŸ™‚
    I played an IM and a GM in simuls. They failed to fall into any trap I'd set up. In fact they tippy toed around it just to make my idea look bad. Bastards! πŸ˜•
    Then I tried to out position them, well that didn't work either.
    Just relax, don't expect a miracle brilliant win, that takes the pressure off of you a bit right there. Relax, play the best you can, use your time wisely. Use passes if available if and when needed.
    Have fun.
    edit: Did I mention relax and have fun?? πŸ˜•
  3. 24 Jan '14 08:40
    Another thread by Marc Benford.
  4. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    24 Jan '14 08:48
    Originally posted by Sebastian Yap
    Another thread by Marc Benford.
    Thanks for pointing that out. πŸ˜•
  5. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    24 Jan '14 11:20
    Originally posted by ChessPraxis
    Thanks for pointing that out. πŸ˜•
    Yeah, how could we have known otherwiseπŸ™‚

    One thing, Marc, you have played not a single move here. How can we even tell what level you are at? Like are you a bottom end club player? Expert? Why do you bother commenting here if you intend never to play a game?
  6. 24 Jan '14 15:25
    Just play how you normally play.
    The stronger player wins round 1 if you adopt a new persona just because you
    are playing him.

    He will be looking forward to seeing the 'out of book' move.
    Nothing will annoy him more than a sound opening played by someone
    who has inkling of what they are doing.

    When I was considered a strong player you be surprised after the game how often
    the much lower rated player would say something like;
    "I don't normally (or never) play this opening but because it's you...etc..etc...."

    Or:

    Find out who he is and look up his games.
    Find a loss from early on in hs career played against someone he has not played since.

    Message him with:

    "Hi, we meet again, I think I was rather lucky in that 2001 game in (insert town here.)
    Today you might get your revenge!....Good Luck."

    and Good Luck to you.
  7. 24 Jan '14 15:50
    1.

    Play sharp opening but not main stream sharp.
    (Search the miniatures from past decades - not recent ones - in which GM are the defeated.)

    2.
    Choose your seat carefully: after studying the list of competitors, place your but after two relatively strong challengers.

    3.
    Look stupid, like you learned the rules yesterday.

    4.
    Then, hide yourself, try if GM can forget you - it's essential if you play handicap match, so GM can lose by flag on the clock.

    5.
    You can hire an assistant, sexy girl (or fellow) who can distract GM just when he approaches your table.

    6.
    Place as many things on the table as you can: chocolate, cookies, beverages: you might be given a chance to steal some of GM's piece.
  8. 25 Jan '14 00:29
    I beat a gm one on one in a blitz. Key is persuading them to join you in a pub first
  9. 25 Jan '14 16:13
    wear a bikini.
  10. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    25 Jan '14 17:17 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Just play how you normally play.

    and Good Luck to you.
    True, Play your game as usual, and the GM will be glad to demonstrate how to punish it. That's what they do, and they're very good at it. Step out of your normal play and then you're both (well at least you will be) in new territory. The one advantage you might have is he or she has never played you before. (I assume) He is more used to beating his own kind, so perhaps you might throw him a curve with some complex idea you're familiar with that he has seldom seen before.
  11. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    25 Jan '14 17:20
    Originally posted by vandervelde
    1.

    Play sharp opening but not main stream sharp.
    (Search the miniatures from past decades - not recent ones - in which GM are the defeated.)

    2.
    Choose your seat carefully: after studying the list of competitors, place your but [b]after
    two relatively strong challengers.

    3.
    Look stupid, like you learned the rules yesterday.

    4.
    Then, ...[text shortened]... you can: chocolate, cookies, beverages: you might be given a chance to steal some of GM's piece.[/b]
    If you know the field it's always good to clump the strongest players together. That portion of the room will slow the play down for the weaker players and give them time to think. Also the clump of players might provoke some blunders by the GM. My experience you have a greater chance playing sharp and complicated than to simplify and out position.
  12. 26 Jan '14 03:15 / 3 edits
    "Step out of your normal play and then you're both (well at least you will be) in new territory."

    The GM/IM will understand the 'new' position better than you.
    At least give yourself a chance.
    If you have a sneaky uncommon trap that you know fairly well then go for it.
    Fischer, Lasker and Capablaca walked into a couple of good tricks whe ...[text shortened]... have time to come to grips with an alien position.
    Play what you know and take the free lesson.

    The lad is looking for advice playing in an internet simul. Not an OTB simul.
  13. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    26 Jan '14 03:29
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Hi CP.

    "Step out of your normal play and then you're both (well at least you will be) in new territory."

    The GM/IM will understand the 'new' position better than you.
    At least give yourself a chance.
    If you have a sneaky uncommon trap that you know fairly well then go for it.
    Fischer, Lasker and Capablaca walked into a couple of good tricks whe ...[text shortened]... have time to come to grips with an alien position.
    Play what you know and take the free lesson.
    Sorry GP πŸ™
  14. 26 Jan '14 03:34
    It's OK.πŸ™‚

    Never played a GM in a blitz simul. Maybe going for haywire position
    from move one might work....No....it's what he will be expecting.
  15. 26 Jan '14 04:04 / 1 edit
    Hi again CP.

    GM's Donner's advice when playing in an OTB simultaneous display.

    If you are to stand a chance of scoring a half or a full point, there are a few things to bear in mind:

    A. Be sure to take special care in the opening.
    Play something you know well and play carefully.
    The simul-giver will be very unpleasantly surprised to find that after
    some twenty moves he has achieved nothing at your board.
    He will usually propose a draw to be rid of such a troublemaker.
    Do not accept! Your boldness will greatly upset him.

    B. Play aggressively. Ninety-five percent of all victims in simultaneous
    displays usually owe their defeat to their own passivity.
    The simul-giver lacks the time to work out variations but doing so is
    more important when defending than in an attack.

    On psychological grounds, too, aggressively approaching
    the simul-giver is a sound and very effective strategy.

    C. Don't be afraid to exchange pieces. The simul-giver will play the
    endgame much better than you, but it is—once again—very important at
    this stage of the game to calculate variations and that is precisely
    what he has no time for. Do not be afraid!

    My last OTB simul v a GM.

    J.Agaard - G.Chandler, Glasgow 2008