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  1. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    19 May '16 06:23
    About @ilywrin (Last moved 2110 days 8 hours and 3 minutes ago)

    "More of a chess composer than chess player but still...
    Try this one (mine):
    White: Ka4, Rb1, Bc6, Bg1
    Black: Ka6, Ba8
    _________________________

    "2# (White to play and mate in 2 moves)
    If you cannot solve it without moving the pieces, then chess is probably not your game."
  2. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    19 May '16 09:49
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    About @ilywrin (Last moved 2110 days 8 hours and 3 minutes ago)

    "More of a chess composer than chess player but still...
    Try this one (mine):
    White: Ka4, Rb1, Bc6, Bg1
    Black: Ka6, Ba8
    _________________________

    "2# (White to play and mate in 2 moves)
    If you cannot solve it without moving the pieces, then chess is probably not your game."
    Rb7!! ..Bxb7 Bb5#
  3. 19 May '16 11:55 / 1 edit
    G.B's mate in two. White to play.



    Although this is not a KBB v B puzzle it is a two Bishop mate.
    I have found nine stalemates on RHP from KBB v K games.

    CM9 - shaker30 RHP 2012 (Black to play)


    Black played 1...Bf4 stalemate. There is a mate in 3.

    schlumpfine - dirtysniper RHP 20111 (Black to play)


    Black played 1...Be4 Stalemate. There is a mate in 3.

    The game above has only one solution. The second has many.
    There are 12-13 different ways to mate in 3 (only one to stalemate)
    This game has a spot reserved in a future 'Red Hot Pawn Hall of Doom'.
  4. Standard member Duncan Clarke
    Student
    21 May '16 08:27
    An interesting problem. But like most mate in 2 problems.

    1. The victim king cannot move.
    2. The winning player has dominating forces and could win easily, anyway.
    3. Time spent looking for the 2 move mate, may well be better spent.
  5. Subscriber Ragwortonline
    Ex Duris Gloria
    22 May '16 05:12
    Originally posted by Duncan Clarke
    An interesting problem. But like most mate in 2 problems.

    1. The victim king cannot move.
    2. The winning player has dominating forces and could win easily, anyway.
    3. Time spent looking for the 2 move mate, may well be better spent.
    That's the attitude that leads to 1. Bxa8 and a red face. A consideration of the implications of that might lead you to seeing the solution which is why ilywrin says what he says about anyone not solving it. The return in the time invested can then be spent at the bar for example. Despite the modern emphasis on trying to make chess a game of subliminal pattern recognition I still believe it is game that rewards thought.
  6. Standard member Duncan Clarke
    Student
    22 May '16 08:57 / 1 edit
    Sure, the game rewards thought. But the position is farcical. What was black's last move? The best I can come up with is Bb7-a8 - but why?

    Mate in 2 is succinct, but the time spent thinking it through is, in my opinion, time not well spent. Mate in 3, in this position follows a natural progression and, in terms of clock time, is certainly going to be much less.
  7. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    22 May '16 12:02
    Originally posted by Duncan Clarke
    Sure, the game rewards thought. But the position is farcical. What was black's last move? The best I can come up with is Bb7-a8 - but why?

    Mate in 2 is succinct, but the time spent thinking it through is, in my opinion, time not well spent. Mate in 3, in this position follows a natural progression and, in terms of clock time, is certainly going to be much less.
    It's only farcical if one assumes that the position should come from a game of competitive chess. But it obviously doesn't, nor was it intended to, nor should it have. Problems have intrinsic value and chess is richer than just a competition between two players.
  8. 22 May '16 12:28
    Sometimes you get study like positions appearing
    in games. This piece of magic comes to mind.

    White to play and win. (mate in 7)


    Ivanchuk - Shirov, Bazna 2009

  9. Subscriber Ragwortonline
    Ex Duris Gloria
    22 May '16 13:22 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Duncan Clarke
    Sure, the game rewards thought. But the position is farcical. What was black's last move? The best I can come up with is Bb7-a8 - but why?

    Mate in 2 is succinct, but the time spent thinking it through is, in my opinion, time not well spent. Mate in 3, in this position follows a natural progression and, in terms of clock time, is certainly going to be much less.
    My feeling is that thinking about the position and the move white might make it is reasonable as well as artistic to leave the opponent one legal move that allows mate.

    I don't know about you but when I've missed something in a game it's usually because my mind has not been open to a possibility and is following a narrow train of thought. I missed a mate in two in this position during a county match against Cambridgeshire a few years ago - all because I was absorbed with not allowing a back rank mate such that I had closed my mind to rook moves. White to play...




    I won in the end but had to face down some clock pressure as well as needing to bring home a point for the team. Of course afterwards every one including the cat was queuing up to demonstrate the win.
  10. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    23 May '16 16:36
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Sometimes you get study like positions appearing
    in games. This piece of magic comes to mind.

    White to play and win. (mate in 7)
    [fen]8/8/5NkP/5bB1/7K/8/8/8 w - - 0 84[/fen]

    Ivanchuk - Shirov, Bazna 2009

    [pgn]
    [FEN "8/8/5NkP/5bB1/7K/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"]

    1. h7 {Black resigned.} 1... Kg7 2. h8=Q+ Kxh8 3. Bh6 {Black is reduced t ...[text shortened]... ce on the dark squares.} 4... Bh5 5. Bf8 Bg6 {Please take me.} 6. Kh6 Bb1 7. Bg7 {Mate.}
    [/pgn]
    That is gorgeous!
  11. 23 May '16 23:18
    This is still my favorite puzzle. I first saw this 10 years ago
  12. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    24 May '16 01:47
    Originally posted by giantsfan94707
    This is still my favorite puzzle. I first saw this 10 years ago
    Funnily enough I remember solving this around about the same time! 😀
  13. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    24 May '16 03:37
    Originally posted by Duncan Clarke
    Sure, the game rewards thought. But the position is farcical. What was black's last move? The best I can come up with is Bb7-a8 - but why?

    Mate in 2 is succinct, but the time spent thinking it through is, in my opinion, time not well spent. Mate in 3, in this position follows a natural progression and, in terms of clock time, is certainly going to be much less.
    Black might have played Bb7-a8 to set up a stalemate trap, in the OP position if white plays 1. Bxa8 it's stalemate. Alternatively, the two previous moves could have been Bh2-g1+ Ka6, although it's hard to see what could have preceded that.

    With that style of study there are no extraneous pieces. One could add a couple of pawns and a rook where it can't give a check or prevent either of the checkmates (if black has a move to make which isn't Bxb7 then white has mate with Ra7) but positional realism isn't what the composer's aiming for.
  14. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    25 May '16 08:51
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    That is gorgeous!
    Ditto.
  15. Standard member Duncan Clarke
    Student
    04 Jun '16 00:36
    Precisely,
    An artificial position. Anyone with a grading above 1200 Elo could drop some pieces on a board and make a puzzle of it.