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  1. 06 May '07 23:35
    I find that in many games I play, I tend to do alright until around move 25-30 onwards, even against players ranked up to 100-200 above me (meaning I seldom find myself on the ropes early unless I blunder big-time). But from around move 25-30 onwards, I often seem to lose my way and get behind against my opponent.

    I have therefore concluded that I probably need to focus more on improving my endgame play (or possibly middlegame play as well). Can anybody recommend any good books on this topic, or other ways to improve that area of my play? Any suggestions would be most welcome.
  2. Standard member hammster21
    Endgamer
    07 May '07 00:02
    Pandolfini's Endgame Course helped me out alot. Maybe you could post some of your games here and we could maybe pick out certain areas for improvement. If you have a winning endgame then ask yourself what is your opponements last chance to win the game, then either stop his plans or make sure you can complete whatever it is you need to win first.
  3. 07 May '07 00:16 / 1 edit
    I found Chessmaster with Josh Waitzkin is really helpful, he explains Every aspect of the game from Start to finish especially the middle to end game
  4. Standard member hammster21
    Endgamer
    07 May '07 00:55
    Originally posted by King Dominic
    I found Chessmaster with Josh Waitzkin is really helpful, he explains Every aspect of the game from Start to finish especially the middle to end game
    I agree, I thought I was forgetting something, CM9000 is a great teaching tool.
  5. 07 May '07 01:33
    Originally posted by hammster21
    Pandolfini's Endgame Course helped me out alot. Maybe you could post some of your games here ...
    Sure, here's an example game here. Game 3462451

    I thought I was doing reasonably well until after the exchange of Queens, when he launched a queenside pawn avalanche on me. In hindsight I guess I should have seen that coming, and maybe avoided swapping Queens, as I needed by Queen to try to pick off his pawns on the queenside
  6. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    07 May '07 01:41
    Originally posted by B Money
    Sure, here's an example game here. Game 3462451

    I thought I was doing reasonably well until after the exchange of Queens, when he launched a queenside pawn avalanche on me. In hindsight I guess I should have seen that coming, and maybe avoided swapping Queens, as I needed by Queen to try to pick off his pawns on the queenside
    yep. with his three connected passed pawns you didn't have a snowball's chance in hell. that's also what you do when you get a won pawn endgame. you trade pieces off to prevent counterplay.
  7. 07 May '07 01:44 / 1 edit
    For a "lightweight" endgame book, consider "Improve Your Endgame Play" by GM Glenn Flear. I own the book and recommend it highly.

    Aside from actually winning more of those endgames where you have a theoretical win, there is another advantage to learning endgames. You also will now have a better idea on how to conduct some middlegames, because you'll have a better idea as to whether you should be trying to simplify into an endgame or are better off keeping the game complicated.
  8. 07 May '07 02:07
    Originally posted by B Money
    Sure, here's an example game here. Game 3462451

    I thought I was doing reasonably well until after the exchange of Queens, when he launched a queenside pawn avalanche on me. In hindsight I guess I should have seen that coming, and maybe avoided swapping Queens, as I needed by Queen to try to pick off his pawns on the queenside
    In the QGA, you should always try to get the pawn back (on the c-file). Once you lost all 3 defending pawns, there was very little you could do to stop that; he could not have marched down the board if your pawns were still there. Thus, it is probably a win for black regardless. The endgame didn't look awful for you.

    In my humble (and disputable) opinion, play e3 and use all your power on the queenside earlier, to get rid of the pawns and even the count. It is way easier than trying to pick them off once his pieces are mobilized. Likely continuation after 4.e3 is his b4, then play a4 and you usually get your pawn back.
  9. 07 May '07 02:24 / 1 edit
    The Best endings books are


    Silmans Complete Endgame course by Silman
    Just the Facts! by Alburt and Krogius
    Winning Chess Endings by Seirawan

    Also, a method I've developed (but have yet to try out) for learning endgames is this: take an endgame position where you think you could've won or drawn but lost. Find the point where the critical mistake(s) were made and play that position against a computer. I believe this will increase your endgame understanding.

    Endgames are also my weak point. My rating is a little under 1500, but in games against 1600's, 1800's, and even 1900's, I had an even position which I blew in the endgame. Good luck.