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  1. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    07 Jan '13 18:48 / 1 edit
    Hi all,

    Normally a 19 move draw would not be interesting, but this one was an exception for me. I found this in Charlie Storey's The Sniper.

    What interested me is that Carlsen plays a series of VERY non-stereotyped moves in the Dragon, and emerges with a very equal position against the World Champion.

    As a long-time Dragon player (on and off OTB with it), I found myself multiple times saying to myself "Whoa, I wasn't expecting THAT move- I thought it was a mistake to do that!"


  2. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    07 Jan '13 19:16
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    Hi all,

    Normally a 19 move draw would not be interesting, but this one was an exception for me. I found this in Charlie Storey's The Sniper.

    What interested me is that Carlsen plays a series of VERY non-stereotyped moves in the Dragon, and emerges with a very equal position against the World Champion.

    As a long-time Dragon player (o ...[text shortened]... Champion, so I'd call it a success.} 1/2-1/2[/pgn]
    As white I've been trying to exchange my Nd4 for black's Nc6 in many Sicilians. I've found that often black's center pawns are ready made targets rather than an asset for him. (Nothing to do with this game or the Dragon in particular, just an observation about accepted chess theory and possible breakthroughs and advancements)
  3. 08 Jan '13 10:22
    A very interesting game, especially because at first glance it doesn't look like a drawn position (at least not yet, anyway). I suppose the difference for us on CC is that you would be lucky to find someone to accept a draw in that situation, and often you sigh and prepare for a 50 move plus endgame which is likely to be a draw anyway 🙂
    Very instructive, thanks!
  4. 08 Jan '13 11:51
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    Hi all,

    Normally a 19 move draw would not be interesting, but this one was an exception for me. I found this in Charlie Storey's The Sniper.

    What interested me is that Carlsen plays a series of VERY non-stereotyped moves in the Dragon, and emerges with a very equal position against the World Champion.

    As a long-time Dragon player (o ...[text shortened]... Champion, so I'd call it a success.} 1/2-1/2[/pgn]
    Yes this is awesome, positionally its a master piece. I will play the dragon in my next game to honour this magnificent post, interesting is some of the derision and criticism that has been aimed at the book that you mention and although i have not read it and I guess its the kind of intellectual snobbery that one must put up with. On youtube an IM (his channel is chess explained which is rather ironic because he never really explains anything about chess thinking, just games and variations) stated that its one of the worst books that he has read.
  5. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    08 Jan '13 12:28
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    Yes this is awesome, positionally its a master piece. I will play the dragon in my next game to honour this magnificent post, interesting is some of the derision and criticism that has been aimed at the book that you mention and although i have not read it and I guess its the kind of intellectual snobbery that one must put up with. On youtube an IM ...[text shortened]... ss thinking, just games and variations) stated that its one of the worst books that he has read.
    Wow, I did not know the book had that rep, as so far I have really enjoyed it.

    I took this game from a section where he goes through 7 Carlsen Dragon games, against such players as Anand, Ivanchuk, Leko, Karjakin, and Radjabov.

    Storye's book is really a book about move orders, and I think the fact that he used high-quality games is a major plus in his favor.
  6. 08 Jan '13 12:36
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    Wow, I did not know the book had that rep, as so far I have really enjoyed it.

    I took this game from a section where he goes through 7 Carlsen Dragon games, against such players as Anand, Ivanchuk, Leko, Karjakin, and Radjabov.

    Storye's book is really a book about move orders, and I think the fact that he used high-quality games is a major plus in his favor.
    Andrew Martin also reviewed it and said that he is not convinced by it, had of course Carlsen written it, it may have been viewed rather differently. If you are enjoying it then that's all that matters.
  7. Standard member Kepler
    Demon Duck
    08 Jan '13 13:07
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    Yes this is awesome, positionally its a master piece. I will play the dragon in my next game to honour this magnificent post, interesting is some of the derision and criticism that has been aimed at the book that you mention and although i have not read it and I guess its the kind of intellectual snobbery that one must put up with. On youtube an IM ...[text shortened]... ss thinking, just games and variations) stated that its one of the worst books that he has read.
    Much of the derision is due to Charlie's behaviour on chesspub.com. Someone criticised the opening system rather than the book, he waded in flamethrower on full blast.
  8. 08 Jan '13 13:30
    Originally posted by Kepler
    Much of the derision is due to Charlie's behaviour on chesspub.com. Someone criticised the opening system rather than the book, he waded in flamethrower on full blast.
    Lol, one can imagine smouldering cornflakes strewn across the forum floor!
  9. Standard member Kepler
    Demon Duck
    08 Jan '13 13:38
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    Lol, one can imagine smouldering cornflakes strewn across the forum floor!
    It was entertaining to watch. Charlie still complains about not being treated as a kind of chess god, the inhabitants of chesspub still complain about his behaviour. The Sniper is therefore regarded as unsound for all time. Except when advocated by Roy Henley in his Crushing White books when it is interesting and new and shiny. Internet forums, can't live with them, can't live without them.
  10. 08 Jan '13 13:45
    Originally posted by Kepler
    It was entertaining to watch. Charlie still complains about not being treated as a kind of chess god, the inhabitants of chesspub still complain about his behaviour. The Sniper is therefore regarded as unsound for all time. Except when advocated by Roy Henley in his Crushing White books when it is interesting and new and shiny. Internet forums, can't live with them, can't live without them.
    LOL, he harbours some delusions of grandeur? Actually his idea was not that original, International master Alexander Bangiev suggested the moves ...g7, ...Bg7 and ...c5 as a repertoire for black against everything white plays ages ago. Charlie sounds as if he rocked a few boats, oh chess players and their egos! cant live with or without them 🙂
  11. Standard member Kepler
    Demon Duck
    08 Jan '13 14:29
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    LOL, he harbours some delusions of grandeur? Actually his idea was not that original, International master Alexander Bangiev suggested the moves ...g7, ...Bg7 and ...c5 as a repertoire for black against everything white plays ages ago. Charlie sounds as if he rocked a few boats, oh chess players and their egos! cant live with or without them 🙂
    Same move order was being used in the '80s by Ray Keene et al. They called it the Pterodactyl. Of course that was when Raymondo was a proper chess player rather than just a purveyor of old gut rot in new bottles.
  12. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    08 Jan '13 14:51
    Originally posted by Kepler
    Same move order was being used in the '80s by Ray Keene et al. They called it the Pterodactyl. Of course that was when Raymondo was a proper chess player rather than just a purveyor of old gut rot in new bottles.
    Keene's Flank Openings is one of my favorite books, and Keene and Reti's play is what attracted me to the book, as I look at all things fianchetto.

    Essentially, it appears Storey advocates Pterodactyl/Dzindzi-Indian ideas with a healthy dose of the Accelerated Dragon, and with a side order of the Schmid Benoni.

    It's a shame about Storey's poor forum antics, but chess players as a whole are a funny bunch.
  13. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    08 Jan '13 14:53
    Originally posted by morgski
    A very interesting game, especially because at first glance it doesn't look like a drawn position (at least not yet, anyway). I suppose the difference for us on CC is that you would be lucky to find someone to accept a draw in that situation, and often you sigh and prepare for a 50 move plus endgame which is likely to be a draw anyway 🙂
    Very instructive, thanks!
    I think you make a good point- it's a draw at their level, but at our level there are still plenty of opportunities to screw up!
  14. Standard member Kepler
    Demon Duck
    08 Jan '13 15:00
    Storey now has a book out in pdf form that deals with the white version of the Sniper. 1. g3 2. Bg2 3. c4. From what I have seen of it, it would be better to play 1. g3 and then 2. c4 against anything but 1. ... d5 then follow Tony Kosten's ideas in his book on the English. That is what Storey does except he shoves Bg2 in before c4, giving black other resources to play with. He even suggests playing c3 then c4 in order to lose a move, at which point "just read my book on the Sniper or watch my DVDs and reverse everything". The surprising thing for me is he doesn't seem to suggest a white version of the Dzindzi Indian if black plays 1. ... d5. Or maybe I missed it and will find it on a second reading.

    Chess players are indeed a funny bunch, as a quick perusal of these forums will reveal.
  15. 08 Jan '13 15:14 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Kepler
    Storey now has a book out in pdf form that deals with the white version of the Sniper. 1. g3 2. Bg2 3. c4. From what I have seen of it, it would be better to play 1. g3 and then 2. c4 against anything but 1. ... d5 then follow Tony Kosten's ideas in his book on the English. That is what Storey does except he shoves Bg2 in before c4, giving black other resou .

    Chess players are indeed a funny bunch, as a quick perusal of these forums will reveal.
    I love Tony Kostens book on the English, I have played nothing else after reading it, the whole point of it was to avoid theory and certain lines and to limit blacks replies, id be very surprised if Storey improved upon it. I agree with your evaluation, the whole point of 1.c4 is that while it cannot ultimately prevent ...d5, it certainly takes the sting out of it. I am going to try Kostens recommendation for dealing with the reversed dragon and reverse it back and play it as black, it resembles a dragondorf and is easy to play with clear plans.