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  1. 17 Oct '08 00:27
    First of all I have games going on where this specific variation has been played so someone please let me know if that's considered a violation of the "no talking about games in progress" rule. Just in general, after playing 3.Bc4, many will reply with 3...h6, the obvious idea is to prevent Ng5 and avoid lines such as the fried liver attack. This move just seems a little too passive to me and not necessarily the best way to get out of those types of lines. If it is not a board violation, please post your opinion on the move 3.....h6 in the Italian Game.
  2. 17 Oct '08 00:40
    Originally posted by stockton1984
    First of all I have games going on where this specific variation has been played so someone please let me know if that's considered a violation of the "no talking about games in progress" rule. Just in general, after playing 3.Bc4, many will reply with 3...h6, the obvious idea is to prevent Ng5 and avoid lines such as the fried liver attack. This move ...[text shortened]... is not a board violation, please post your opinion on the move 3.....h6 in the Italian Game.
    It's for wusses... let wusses play how they want to.. wussest!
  3. Subscriber no1marauder
    Humble and Kind
    17 Oct '08 01:34
    Originally posted by stockton1984
    First of all I have games going on where this specific variation has been played so someone please let me know if that's considered a violation of the "no talking about games in progress" rule. Just in general, after playing 3.Bc4, many will reply with 3...h6, the obvious idea is to prevent Ng5 and avoid lines such as the fried liver attack. This move ...[text shortened]... is not a board violation, please post your opinion on the move 3.....h6 in the Italian Game.
    Pavel Blatny, a Czech GM has played this as Black a good number of times with better than 50% results.
  4. 17 Oct '08 05:44
    I'm familiar with some of Blatnys games, at least a few of them that he played against Josh Waitzkin that Josh annotates on the ps2 chessmaster game.
  5. Standard member Korch
    Chess Warrior
    17 Oct '08 06:08 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by stockton1984
    First of all I have games going on where this specific variation has been played so someone please let me know if that's considered a violation of the "no talking about games in progress" rule. Just in general, after playing 3.Bc4, many will reply with 3...h6, the obvious idea is to prevent Ng5 and avoid lines such as the fried liver attack. This move ...[text shortened]... is not a board violation, please post your opinion on the move 3.....h6 in the Italian Game.
    3...h6 could be playable (at least I don`t see forced refutation), but Black definitely have some more useful moves (like 3...Nf6 and 3...Bc5). On the other side - 3...h6 may provoke your opponent to premature actions. That could be reason why GM Pavel Blatny (GM very original opening repertoire) have used it .
  6. 17 Oct '08 10:07
    After 3...h6, I always found 4.d4 to be good for white.
  7. 17 Oct '08 12:37 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Schumi
    After 3...h6, I always found 4.d4 to be good for white.
    I have seen this a lot on this site and I also think that d4 is a great response. Sometimes I see lines where e5, Nc6, Bc5, h6 is played by black in chich case I will play b4!? shifting into Evan's gambit like lines where black has wasted time playing h6 (to the best of my knowledge black doesn't usually do that against Evans. Basically I think black is jumping at a nonexistant (yet) threat.
  8. 17 Oct '08 14:23
    If your opponent plays a non-developing move in the opening then it is often worth opening up the centre and I would play 4. d4 in that position without thinking twice. Obviously White hasn't got a clear win but I'd be happy to start every game where I'm White from that position!
  9. 17 Oct '08 19:26 / 1 edit
    Hi.

    1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 h6?!



    There are certainly better moves for Black in the position.

    The fact that GM Pavel Blatny played it does not make it a good move.
    A lot of good players play 'bad' moves against certain opponents to
    tempt them forward or to simply avoid their theory.

    When you become a good player then you can take chances like
    3...h6?! in your games. Until then you must know and obey the opening principles.

    I am reminded of Miles 1...a6 v Karpov. Hundreds, nay thousands of
    games were lost by Black 1...a6 players because they were NOT Tony Miles.

    There is no tactical bust but if White simply ignores it and carries
    on delevoping to a plan he will reach a comfortable middle game.

    In the following instructive game, played in 1863,
    White simply ignored 3...h6 and played 4.c3 building a pawn centre.
    A simple and solid idea.

    The hole created at g6 by 3..h6?! was utilised by White quite brilliantly.

    One should look at the old games because there you will find all the blunders
    and lemons that are made by todays players. A beginner in 2008 will play
    the same blunders as a beginner in the 1800's.

    http://www.gambitchess.com/semi/db6.htm

    Find 1,000 Short Games by Chernev. Play through them and you will see all the
    opening blunders refuted in an instructive and sometimes amusing fashion.

    After the first 50 or so you will start to spot, feel or sense the blunder
    and should be able to see, or at least have an idea of the tactical refutation.

    You will soon have the knack for punishing clumsy opening moves and
    of course eradicate them from your own games.

    I say again this is not the bust to 3...h6?! but it does highlight
    the danger that Black can face should he ignore the developing principles,
    especially in a 1.e4 e5 opening.

    Watkinson - Amatuer, London 1863