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  1. 23 Nov '06 23:34
    The other day I picked up Lasker's "Chess Strategy," written in 1915. It's good, but because it was written back in a previous era, it suffers from a number of defects, including descriptive notation, archaic prose, and unclear diagrams. There must be more up to date book that does a good job of laying out the basic principles of chess strategy. Any recommendations? Thanks.
  2. Standard member English Tal
    Phoneless
    23 Nov '06 23:45
    Originally posted by basso
    The other day I picked up Lasker's "Chess Strategy," written in 1915. It's good, but because it was written back in a previous era, it suffers from a number of defects, including descriptive notation, archaic prose, and unclear diagrams. There must be more up to date book that does a good job of laying out the basic principles of chess strategy. Any recommendations? Thanks.
    Don't knock descriptive notation! One of the all time greats is 'Chess for Tigers', I think.
  3. 23 Nov '06 23:48
    "Chess for Tigers" is damn good.
  4. 23 Nov '06 23:48
    Originally posted by basso
    The other day I picked up Lasker's "Chess Strategy," written in 1915. It's good, but because it was written back in a previous era, it suffers from a number of defects, including descriptive notation, archaic prose, and unclear diagrams. There must be more up to date book that does a good job of laying out the basic principles of chess strategy. Any recommendations? Thanks.
    I think you can get the Lasker books from here for free. Although im too tired to check it out for sure.

    http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page
  5. Standard member Diet Coke
    Forum Vampire
    23 Nov '06 23:55
    Originally posted by Bedlam
    "Chess for Tigers" is damn good.
    No it's not.

    It's for Zebra's.
  6. 24 Nov '06 00:04
    Thats pretty good too, Rowson is a great writer
  7. 24 Nov '06 08:46 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by basso
    The other day I picked up Lasker's "Chess Strategy," written in 1915. It's good, but because it was written back in a previous era, it suffers from a number of defects, including descriptive notation, archaic prose, and unclear diagrams. There must be more up to date book that does a good job of laying out the basic principles of chess strategy. Any recommendations? Thanks.
    I think it's worth pointing out that Chess Strategy was written by Edward Lasker, not Emanuel Lasker, who was still World Champion in 1915.

    Also, Chess Strategy can be found online in many places, for example:
    http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/5614

    Imagine being one of the top ten chess players in the world, but still not the best "E. Lasker"!
  8. 24 Nov '06 08:52
    pandolfinis weapons of chess is pretty good and has many concepts. as i have learned more i would have bought more books on certain openings to specialize in them but a very good book for understanding the middle game is pawn structure by andrew soltis probably one of the best chess books i have read.
  9. 24 Nov '06 11:36
    Originally posted by Bedlam
    "Chess for Tigers" is damn good.
    I do not like "chess for tigers".
    "Chess Training for Budding Champions" (Jesper Hall, Gambit publications) is much better!!
  10. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    24 Nov '06 16:21
    Originally posted by basso
    archaic prose,
    This would seem a strength, as many school teachers in our era are functional illiterates.

    Learning descriptive notation is worthwhile if you want to read old books.

    Edward Lasker's books are good. Emanuel's are even better.

    For a basic book on strategy, Capablanca's Chess Fundamentals is a gem. Nick de Firmian has revised and updated it (including translating the notation to algebraic) without entirely ruining it.
  11. 24 Nov '06 20:01
    How about Nimzowich (sp?)?
  12. 25 Nov '06 12:47
    You can't really go wrong with Seirewan's winning chess strategies. A really great book laying out all the fundamental strategic and positional principles of the immortal game. A must have for anybody 1000-1600 elo.
  13. 25 Nov '06 14:22
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    For a basic book on strategy, Capablanca's Chess Fundamentals is a gem. Nick de Firmian has revised and updated it (including translating the notation to algebraic) without entirely ruining it.
    If you want an algebraic version of Capa's Chess Fundamentals that's faithful to the original text, try getting a copy of Cadogan's 1994 algebraic version. I would prefer reading the original text and games, rather than de Firmian's chopped up interpretation.

    For more details, read Edward Winter's Chess Notes Archive 22 in the link below. (Once there, scroll down to entries 4368 and 4379.)

    http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/winter22.html
  14. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    25 Nov '06 16:31
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    If you want an algebraic version of Capa's Chess Fundamentals that's faithful to the original text, try getting a copy of Cadogan's 1994 algebraic version. I would prefer reading the original text and games, rather than de Firmian's chopped up interpretation.

    For more details, read Edward Winter's Chess Notes Archive 22 in the link below. (Once there, scroll down to entries 4368 and 4379.)

    http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/winter22.html
    Thanks for the link.

    I have and use an old copy of the original Capablanca in descriptive notation, and have only examined de Firmian's version in the aisles of the bookstore. Edward Winter's outrage is well supported by close scrutiny of the text. Getting one of Capablanca's endgames wrong appears the most egregious error among those Winter lists, IMHO.

    The Cadogan edition appears to be widely available: http://www.wholesalechess.com/chess/chess_books/Chess+Fundamentals+(Algebraic)
  15. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    25 Nov '06 16:53
    Originally posted by Bedlam
    Thats pretty good too, Rowson is a great writer
    is there anything for capricorns?