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  1. 29 Aug '11 01:33
    Where can I find a source with all of the named mating patterns?
  2. 29 Aug '11 06:57
    There may not be a source that shows all of the named mating patterns, but these two should certainly get you where you want to be:

    1. There is an exceptional old paperback that you may be able to find on eBay, "The Art of the Checkmate", by Georges Renaud and Victor Kahn. This book, with 200+ pages, not only shows a great many mating patterns, but gives games illustrating some, and even has exercise positions in which you can test yourself on the patterns that have been shown in the previous chapter.

    2. One of Eric Schiller's few really good books is "The Encyclopedia of Chess Wisdom", which has just tons of interesting stuff in it, including a 32-page chapter entitled "Checkmating Patterns". This chapter has simple diagrams showing the essence of each mate, followed by another diagram with a game position demonstrating how it can work out on the board. (As an interesting sidebar, the chapter following that is "Stalemating Patterns", and it's the only time I can recall seeing so many of those gathered in one place.)

    Hope you find these helpful.

    regards,
  3. 29 Aug '11 09:17
    Originally posted by Gambiteer
    2. One of Eric Schiller's few really good books is "The Encyclopedia of Chess Wisdom", which has just tons of interesting stuff in it ...
    I suppose it is quite good by Schiller standards...

    (From http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/schiller.html)

    Then there is the Encyclopedia of Chess Wisdom, another showcase for Schiller’s slapdashery, as the following examples show:

    Wrong moves: On page 59, after 1 e4 e5 2 f4, Black’s move is given as …Be5, twice. Page 301 has the illegal move Qh4+ instead of Qh6+. The same page claims that in a simple queen ending 3 Qc1 is mate, but it is not. Page 279 has …Qa1 checkmate instead of …Qh1.

    Wrong history: Page 69 attributes a quote to Tarrasch in 1935, by which time he was already dead. Page 167 claims that in 1895 Lasker was ‘on his way to the World Championship’, but he had won it in 1894.

    Inscrutable reasoning: Page 82 starts: ‘White offered the initial gambit, but it is Black who holds the extra pawn.’ This refers to a position where White is a pawn ahead.

    Illiteracy: ‘it is still you’re turn to move’ (page 142). Another example: ‘A passed pawn increases it’s strength …’ (page 250 – in large letters and framed).

    Bizarre typos: ‘There are of course slow ways of chasing denied away …’ (page 131). From the context, it would seem that ‘chasing the knight away’ was meant. Another example comes on page 145: ‘it can also crate threats’. With all Schiller’s typos, one could pass denied away crating lists.

    Misspelling of names: ‘Lake Hopatong’ (page 160). ‘Wywill’ (page 297).

    Wrong diagram: Page 198, for example.

    Inconsistent spelling: Brinkmate/Brinckmate (page 262). Malteses Cross/Maltese cross (page 280 – with another wrong diagram). Wolf’s/Wolff’s (page 331). The next page has Englisch/English.

    Nonsensical game-score: Pages 321-322 have a game ‘Pillsbury v Lee, London 1889’. The two did not even meet that year. Ten years later they played a game which opened similarly, but the continuation given by Schiller was in fact what occurred, up to a point, in a different game, Pillsbury v Newman, Philadelphia, 1900. In short, yet another shambles.

    Awful writing style: A specimen from page 343: ‘What on earth is going on here. White is giving away the store! Let’s see, Black has an extra rook, worth five clams or whatever, and can eat another one at a1. Must be winning, right?’

    Inaccurate rating scale: According to the chart on page 408, a typical ‘International Grandmaster’ is likely to have an Elo rating of 2800 (200 points more than ‘World Class Grandmasters&rsquo, and the figure given for an International Master is 2000.
  4. 29 Aug '11 09:53
    Sadly, that last post is completely off topic, contributes NOTHING to the OP's request for information, and does NOTHING with its list of niggling points to nullify what I said, that the book is a good book with a lot of good stuff in it. So it has typos.... I've never seen a chess book without 'em.

    regards,
  5. 29 Aug '11 11:03
    I've never seen a full list, but a comprehensive tutorial for mating patterns and attacking patterns can be found in "The Art of Attack in Chess" by Vladimir Vukovic. This is a highly praised book and having started reading it I see why.
    There is a version by Everyman Chess that has algebraic notation.

    You can also find a huge list of mating patterns in the hefty volume named "Chess : 5334 Problems Combinations and Games" by Laszlo Polgar. Apparently Laszlo used these patterns to train his 3 girls and they are rumoured to have a wee bit of talent at chess.

    There is also a training DVD available from ChessBase called "Power Play 1 - Mating Patterns" which shows some basic mattern patterns and how to identify when they will work and when they won't.
  6. 29 Aug '11 11:20
    Originally posted by Gambiteer
    Sadly, that last post is completely off topic, contributes NOTHING to the OP's request for information, and does NOTHING with its list of niggling points to nullify what I said, that the book is a good book with a lot of good stuff in it. So it has typos.... I've never seen a chess book without 'em.
    It's not off topic. You recommended a dreadful book by a dreadful author. I'm pointing this out before the OP wastes his money on it.
  7. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    29 Aug '11 12:59
    I have no doubt that GP has all the "named" mating patterns. If not sounds like a blog idea.
  8. 29 Aug '11 13:15 / 2 edits
    Ah...Blog material.

    I gave a whole page i(26 of the basic ones A-Z) n 'Master Chess' written nearly 30 years (Gosh!).

    Someone has turned it into a poster for your bedroom wall!

    http://www.zazzle.co.uk/chess_basic_mating_patterns_poster-228520962380102530

    (honestly it was not me).

    A challenge, which I am sad enough to embark upon on would be to find a MP
    example of each one (A-Z) from RHP games.

    I'm on it - that is the next 26 blogs sorted.

    »»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»

    I like Eric Schiller, leave him alone.....he makes me look good.
    (and visa-versa.)

    »»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»

    EDIT: I never saw your post NImzo, Great minds do indeed think alike.
  9. 29 Aug '11 15:13 / 1 edit
    Indeed that poster looks like it has been half-inched from the book that Mr Pawn co-authored - Mastering Chess: A Course in 21 Lessons:
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mastering-Chess-Course-21-Lessons/dp/0486450619
    (didn't the old edition of this used to be called "Master Chess..." ? I shall have to dig out one of my copies and check).
  10. 29 Aug '11 16:24
    Google!
    Haven't watched it but maybe this is something worhtwhile

    YouTube
  11. 29 Aug '11 16:54
    I have the Vladimir Vukovic book and I have seen that youtube video. Maybe I will compile all the patterns myself.... My main point for wanting them was to commit them to memory.
  12. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    29 Aug '11 17:11
    Originally posted by tomtom232
    I have the Vladimir Vukovic book and I have seen that youtube video. Maybe I will compile all the patterns myself.... My main point for wanting them was to commit them to memory.
    I can't remember anything I've ever forgotten.
  13. 30 Aug '11 00:58
    Yasser Seirawan's Winning Chess Brilliancies is built around the most common mating patterns. It's a really useful book and like all of his books it's fun to read with interesting anecdotes from his career.
  14. 30 Aug '11 01:48
    Hi Data Fly.

    Yes is was Master Chess. It went through three/four publishers.
    Received a cheque every April since 1983.
    We sold the rights a couple of years ago so the current owners can do
    what they ever they want with it.

    Biggest thrill was seeing it translated into Spanish.
    I have a copy of a chess book which I wrote but cannot read!

    With each cheque came an itemised list of where the book was sold.
    USA was always No.1 but one year Chile topped it!

    That must have been the Spanish version.
    I wonder how many Chilean Chess Players I have turned into mad hackers
    and how many curse me?

    "That Senior Chandler, him crazee!"

    __________________________________

    Hi Tom Tom

    The Art of Checkmate is on E-Bay £2.99

    A very interesting review of it....

    "I am strongly opposed to the view that skill in chess can be attained only by hard work."

    ....is here by Purdy.

    http://isolanis.com/2008/01/the-art-of-checkmate-by-renaud-kahn-reviewed-by-cecil-purdy/
  15. Standard member SasuserX
    SAS Lunatic
    30 Aug '11 16:14
    Wikipedia has a pretty good list of these.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Checkmate_patterns