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  1. 03 Aug '12 00:21
    Any of you people good at memorizing variations? I always feel somewhat guilty using opening databases to generate my moves in correspondence chess games but I do it anyway, since it's legal and other people use them.

    I don't want to put myself at a serious disadvantage.

    I wish I had a photographic memory and could memorize hundreds of variations. It would somehow feel more legit if they were stored in my head rather than elsewhere.
  2. Standard member kingshill
    Mr Ring Rusty
    03 Aug '12 01:00
    There is an excellent program called Chess Position Trainer which will help you with your openings.

    http://www.chesspositiontrainer.com/index.php/en/

    When I used to play over the board I used it to memorise my openings. At the moment just like you I use my database for opening work. Since I used it last it's undergone a major revision to 4.1 but with ver 3.3 (which I'm used to) it was possible to feed your opening database into it and used the program to help you memorise the positions.
  3. 03 Aug '12 14:01
    Originally posted by kingshill
    There is an excellent program called Chess Position Trainer which will help you with your openings.

    http://www.chesspositiontrainer.com/index.php/en/

    When I used to play over the board I used it to memorise my openings. At the moment just like you I use my database for opening work. Since I used it last it's undergone a major revision to 4.1 but w ...[text shortened]... o feed your opening database into it and used the program to help you memorise the positions.
    Thanks, I will take a look at it.

    I know that it is most important to be thoroughly aware of the major strategic objectives of whatever opening you play and not slavishly memorize variations without having some idea of the strategy and tactics involved and whether it fits your style.

    And having a good memory keeps you alert for tricky transpositions where a specific opening suddenly transitions into another. I was never good at spotting transpositions.
  4. 04 Aug '12 01:51
    I prefer opening books to chess data bases (ECOs, etc.) I don't subscribe to chessbase but have often thought about it. Anybody out there in the know have any input?
    Some opening books are great but many are - really, really bad - not going to name authors but folks who have been around long may know of authors who tend to produce let's say - trite. Therefore, I recommend looking at chess books where they are sold before laying down cash. I find going to the local club which sells books and going to some chess tournamaments that have vendors selling books.
  5. Standard member Steve45
    Garry Kasparov
    04 Aug '12 23:22
    Hi friends. I,d just like to ask you all, whether or not, the majority of us average players, have a good input of opening theory. I only ask because i admit to being clueless on openings, an yet i still win quite regular on this site. Has anyone got a favourite opening, that i could look into. Thanks friends.
  6. 05 Aug '12 02:02
    i think chessbase is very good imo, with lots of videos available online to download on openings, etc. i find that if i am interested in an opening i try to get several different authors works on it. then try my own lines, with the aid of an engine, to look for novelties. best just play the opening you are interested in and learn from mistakes, chances are your opps aren't going to play what shirov, etc. would play anyway! when you understand an opening well then really study what an expert has to say imo.