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  1. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    06 Jun '08 19:16 / 1 edit
    How ? There are drills in chessmaster with that theme, divided by difficulty. But I am interested if there is some system for better memorization of games...?

    I ask because often I play some nice casual games with my friends and when I lose I would like to analyze it or throw in Fritz, or check my opening mistakes but then I understand that I memorized only 15 moves or less which often is not enough...

    Advices, experiences ?

    Thx
  2. Standard member emanon
    Student
    06 Jun '08 19:34
    The way I do it: Don't try to remember all the positions (Knight on f3 Bishop on ... etc.) Instead, try to remember patterns: Knight could have taken bishop with + and so he had to take knight with ... leading to an open file on ... etc)

    It's a bit hard to explain!
  3. Standard member Dies Irae
    I Love U
    06 Jun '08 20:18
    Yeah, what you have to do is to not remember where the pieces are but what was happening and your thought processes when playing the game.

    Most of the time I can just replay games by remembering my decisions during the game and what I was thinking by playing a move
  4. 06 Jun '08 20:23
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    How ? There are drills in chessmaster with that theme, divided by difficulty. But I am interested if there is some system for better memorization of games...?

    I ask because often I play some nice casual games with my friends and when I lose I would like to analyze it or throw in Fritz, or check my opening mistakes but then I understand that I memorized only 15 moves or less which often is not enough...

    Advices, experiences ?

    Thx
    I think those drills aren't meant to really memorize those games, but to visualize all the moves up to the end so you can produce the end position correctly. Right?

    If you have problems remembering the moves in games you played, write the moves down during the game. I'm sure your friends won't make a fuss about it.
  5. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    06 Jun '08 20:37
    Originally posted by schakuhr
    [b]I think those drills aren't meant to really memorize those games, but to visualize all the moves up to the end so you can produce the end position correctly. Right?
    Well, first the chessmaster dictates moves in algebraic notation, then you have to make the mentioned moves. From 5 to 20 or more, depending on the difficulty you set.
  6. Standard member Ragnorak
    For RHP addons...
    06 Jun '08 20:53
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    Well, first the chessmaster dictates moves in algebraic notation, then you have to make the mentioned moves. From 5 to 20 or more, depending on the difficulty you set.
    I think following the advice given above would be much better than doing Chessmaster drills.

    I find that I can remember whole games fairly easily, if I have played the game at a relatively sedate pace, and in an opening which I am familiar with. Where I occasionally get stumped is in the loss of a tempo somewhere. Everything is in the right position, but the wrong player is to move.

    D
  7. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    06 Jun '08 23:06
    Logical games are easier to memorize than illogical ones. Weak players play illogically. I cannot recall their games. I can recall some of mine for a time after playing them, and some positions and sequences for many years. It depends on the coherence of the game, and my level of concentration. When I'm too tired, or disinterested (such as when playing a particularly weak opponent), I cannot remember the game.
  8. 08 Jun '08 04:37
    Making mental notes helps also it takes time playing chess to pick it up and fully be able to replay the games. If you look at all of the moves possible and make mental notes of why you liked each move you will do much better. Whats scary is I can usually set up 5 games positions from memory as they are in progress.

    Tagging emotional thoughts for each moves is a technique from psychology. I believe it is called the encoding specificity principle if I'm not mistaken.
  9. 08 Jun '08 06:52
    If you write all your games down it will be easier to memorize games.