Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    10 Nov '12 06:35 / 8 edits
    Here is last weeks game I played at Columbia Chess Club. It may be psychologically instructive to those rated around 1500 USCF. I am white against Benjamin Caiello, who is the middle school chess champion of South Carolina. This last weekend after we played this game he also became co-champion of the state of South Carolina. Anyway, I had told several people I thought I could beat this kid and I planned on doing it one day. However, this was not the day.

  2. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    10 Nov '12 06:55
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Anyway, I had told several people I thought I could beat this kid and I planned on doing it one day.
    How loudly did they laugh?
  3. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    10 Nov '12 07:16 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    How loudly did they laugh?
    There was no laughter. They knew I was serious. All I have to do is work some more on my psychology.
  4. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    10 Nov '12 07:59
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Darn it! But, I know the best move here
    LOL
  5. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    10 Nov '12 11:23
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    LOL
    I remembered that from my studies of openings 30 years ago.
  6. Standard member kingshill
    Mr Ring Rusty
    10 Nov '12 19:09
    I looked at the game and comments and I hope that you are taking the piss..!
  7. Standard member gambit05
    Mad Murdock
    10 Nov '12 19:39
    Originally posted by kingshill
    I looked at the game and comments and I hope that you are taking the piss..!
    He is an entertaing charlatan, easy to ignore. You are a strong chess player. Do you need any advice for your moves?
  8. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    10 Nov '12 19:44 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by kingshill
    I looked at the game and comments and I hope that you are taking the piss..!
    The game comments were my attempt to entertain, because no one would even look at the game otherwise. I haven't really studied openings since I came back to chess. So without an opening book I am still lost. I had took some time to study this Alekhine Defense because he had already beaten me twice with it and the word was that he had been playing it a lot lately.

    I had beaten a player rated 1941 at the club earlier when that person played the Sicilian Defense against me. I just happened to know the variation he played and took advantage of an error he made in the later part of the opening. So I told some of the others I was going to beat this kid, who they said was improving rapidly. But he did not play the defense I prepared for, but I knew the Ruy Lopez up to a point, but I figured this kid must have been studying this defense and would probably know the O-O defense to the e4 pawn, so I decided a little psychology was in order. But I also get tired of concentrating after a little while even when psychology may not be involved. I am so out of shape physically that I think it effects my thinking after awhile. I have been meaning to start exercising like my doctor told me, but I keep putting it off.
  9. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    10 Nov '12 19:50 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by gambit05
    He is an entertaing charlatan, easy to ignore. You are a strong chess player. Do you need any advice for your moves?
    I said this was for players around 1500 USCF. I know kingshill does not need advice from me, because I have played him a couple times.
  10. 10 Nov '12 20:26
    Another thread devoted to cheaterology.
  11. 10 Nov '12 20:30 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    The game comments were my attempt to entertain, because no one would even look at the game otherwise. I haven't really studied openings since I came back to chess. So without an opening book I am still lost. I had took some time to study this Alekhine Defense because he had already beaten me twice with it and the word was that he had been playing it a lot ...[text shortened]... ile. I have been meaning to start exercising like my doctor told me, but I keep putting it off.
    the O-O defence to the e4 pawn,

    LOL

    I've prepared the oh oh defence


    Ronald Jonah Hinds, give it up!
  12. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    10 Nov '12 23:38
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    LOL

    The importance of having a plan.

    "I still don't have a plan, so I move my other rook toward the center to wait to see if he has a plan"
  13. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    11 Nov '12 01:41
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    All I have to do is work some more on my psychology.


    You got psyched out by a kid? with your experience and powers?

    Working on a few openings, at your rating, might help you to become world champion!

    (in cc , of course)
  14. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    11 Nov '12 19:09
    Originally posted by mikelom


    You got psyched out by a kid? with your experience and powers?

    Working on a few openings, at your rating, might help you to become world champion!

    (in cc , of course)
    Putting aside all humor, there is a psychological lesson that can be learned here, which I hope I am able to put into practice on future OTB games.

    I. Try to play an opening that you feel comfortable with.

    2. Spend some time learning the popular openings that you expect to be playing OTB.

    3. If you know you will be playing a specific opponent, try to learn what openings he usually plays, so that you can prepare yourself in advance. But don't let it get to you psychological if he plays something different than you expected.

    4. Follow accepted opening procedures of getting you pieces developed to their best and most natural position for the opening system you are playing and don't forget to castle early before your king can be attacked.

    5. Try to avoid complicated variations that you have not studied throughly.

    6. Using tricky or psychological moves do not always work on your oppenent, so it is good to have a backup plan if it fails. Sometimes it ia better on your own psychology to just take the time to find the best move in the position that you can.

    6. Try to come up with a plan of attack and defense as soon as possible, especially after you have reached full development of all pieces.

    7. Try to determine what your opponents plan is and counter it with a plan of your own.

    8. Once you begin the plan, try to continue it unless you are certain there is sufficent need to alter or abandon the plan. If you have the time on the clock, use it to calculate your plan ahead as far as you can see within reason.

    9. Don't forget to look for tactical possibilities from both sides as you execute your plan. If you do see an error in your plan don't panic, but try to calm yourself psychologically and spend time to device a new plan.

    10. I think I demonstrated some things you do not want to do at the end of this game, which is to quit thinking and move like you are playing speed chess with only seconds to move when actually you have about an hour on your clock.

    I think the psycholgy of both players play a part in how the game plays out. I might not have won that game anyway, but I would have been able to give my opponent a better game and at least it would not have been the first one to be finished that night. I hope someone, other than me, learned something from this game and are able to play better OTB games as a result.
  15. 11 Nov '12 19:51
    Thanks RJ. I think my rating is set to soar.