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  1. 27 May '09 18:10
    I've never beat a 1500's player before.

    Game 1: He was outplaying me (IMO), but I got him on a cheap one-move mate that he missed.

    Game 2: I made a huge tactical blonder, lost my rook and destroyed my position - I swiftly resigned.

    Game 3: Finally a "real" positional and tactical victory, even overcoming a stupid tactical error dropping a minor piece.

    Much thanks to agentreno who's suggestions I implimented.

    Much thanks to robbie_carrobie who taught me to "look at the board in an appreciative way" and play the most asthetically pleasing moves!

  2. 27 May '09 18:17
    And of course thanks to PBE6 for being a tough and classy opponent who challenges me to my limits.
  3. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    27 May '09 19:10
    Interesting games all! You definitely had me tied up in that last game. towards the end I was trying to free my knight and trade my light bishop if I could, but the file I opened up in the middle game came back to haunt me later because I didn't take control of it. I'll have to take a look at the rest of the game later to see where I went astray.
  4. Standard member agentreno
    Addicted
    27 May '09 20:03
    Nice win I'm glad to have helped. You could learn a lot from going through that game with a fine tooth comb. I'd be happy to add to any analysis you post here.
  5. 27 May '09 20:07
    Originally posted by agentreno
    Nice win I'm glad to have helped. You could learn a lot from going through that game with a fine tooth comb. I'd be happy to add to any analysis you post here.
    Along those lines, ANY suggestions or constructive criticisms are welcome! Likewise I know PBE6 feels the same. If you want to know why I made certain moves I'll be happy to answer.
  6. Standard member agentreno
    Addicted
    27 May '09 20:13
    Well. I could analyze your game properly from start to finish but you'd gain far more from doing that than I would I'm more likely to be able to help by observing the way you think about it from your own analysis. Plus it's a great way to improve your game.

    I find it quite a big effort though, perhaps you want to save it for your most important games. I only scrutinise my OTB tournament games properly for example.
  7. 27 May '09 20:16
    Originally posted by agentreno
    Well. I could analyze your game properly from start to finish but you'd gain far more from doing that than I would I'm more likely to be able to help by observing the way you think about it from your own analysis. Plus it's a great way to improve your game.

    I find it quite a big effort though, perhaps you want to save it for your most important games. I only scrutinise my OTB tournament games properly for example.
    Other than recognizing my obvious goofs or "oh, yeah, that move would have been better" I've never analized my own games before. What types of things should I be looking for or asking myself when I examine my own game?
  8. 27 May '09 20:37
    Congrats on your win.

    Please bare in mind that i am not one of the strongest players this site, but im still glad to help.

    7. a6 was an ok move but it is probably more important to use that move to either castle or develop a piece.

    9.qd8 didn't mess anything up, but it didn't accomplish much. Better was to push the pawn to h6 and either force the knight back to where it was; wasting a move for your opponent. Or they could have chose to move their knight to h3 which would then be taken by the bishop and would leave white with an exposed king

    22. nd3 hung a piece as you know, but i see what you were thinking, you just didn't realize the queen could capture

    I didn't look in great depth, but those 3 stood out for me from the black side of the board
  9. Standard member agentreno
    Addicted
    27 May '09 20:43 / 1 edit
    Well the most important question is why you won/lost/drew. That is what you'll be trying to answer, in as honest a way as you can. If you can get a computer to check for blunders, that is also helpful so you can identify what sort of thing you tend to miss. Consult opening books and databases to see how that opening is usually played. When did you deviate from the book? Do you prefer your plan, or the conventional plan? How did strong players play this position? Can you figure out why and what made their decision different to yours? Maybe you considered other moves but discarded them. Why not explore them a little, see if they might have been better. It's a lot of work but when you're done you've usually learned a good lesson from your game.
  10. 27 May '09 20:53 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by giantsfan94707
    Congrats on your win.

    Please bare in mind that i am not one of the strongest players this site, but im still glad to help.

    7. a6 was an ok move but it is probably more important to use that move to either castle or develop a piece.

    9.qd8 didn't mess anything up, but it didn't accomplish much. Better was to push the pawn to h6 and either forc ...[text shortened]...
    I didn't look in great depth, but those 3 stood out for me from the black side of the board
    Hi, thanks for the feedback!

    I played a6 because I was preparing for b5. Moving Qd8 was preparing for Be7 so I could aim my guns for the B5 square - same plan. That was momentarily disrupted when he attacked my e-pawn and I had to defend with my knight - blocking my bishop from forming a battery.

    Of course, this plan and/or the way I carried it out might be considered dubious for higher level play. That's what I'm trying to learn here. But at least you know my line of thinking.
  11. 27 May '09 23:28 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    Hi, thanks for the feedback!

    I played a6 because I was preparing for b5. Moving Qd8 was preparing for Be7 so I could aim my guns for the B5 square - same plan. That was momentarily disrupted when he attacked my e-pawn and I had to defend with my knight - blocking my bishop from forming a battery.

    Of course, this plan and/or the way I carried ...[text shortened]... r level play. That's what I'm trying to learn here. But at least you know my line of thinking.
    aaaawesome my friend, truly aaaaaawesome, people is it not beautiful!

    position after 11....Nxe5 look at this, white has no outposts for his knights, while black has e5 and d4!

  12. 28 May '09 03:19 / 1 edit
    My analysis of your good, the begining was correct for both until move 7.

    7. dxe6 was looking good. Black has a weak pawn on d6.



    better think twince before going with such a set-up. What will you do about that weakness ?

    7... a6 look okay, but many alternative are disponible, such as Qb6 and 0-0. You can even think about not castle.

    after 8.. 0-0, we don't have a benoni anymore. we are now in the king indian game.

    9.. Qe8 is not good, but not bad either
    10. F4, we have finaly the four pawn attack. You played 10.. Nd7 ?! let's look at the position.
    Look, white has good space at kingside and should attack there.

    The knight is not really helping in your attack, your game is supposed to be on the queenside... (I think )

    11. fx5 ? Wrong and incorrect, correct was f5, not letting a good square for the knight on d7 and attacking the kingside. You have very little space now 11... Nxe5, now we see the consequence of a bad move, you get an ouposted knight. 12. Bf4 Bd7 13.b3 ?! He do not play at the right place, bomb is gonna explosed in his home.

    13... b5 at the right time, this pawn push create plenty of play.
    let's have a look at the board.

    now in this position, black has the upper hand.
    14. Bd3, a mistake it give an a good advantage to black, worthing a pawn. The bishop is not well placed here.
    14... Nh5. A good move... Open the great diagonal.
    15. Rb1, Inefficace... 15.. Nxf4, Now white's good bishop is gone and white face an attack. 16. Rxf4 b4 ?! not a losing move, but there is much better. bxc4 ! And now you are completly in a winning position,

    Let's look at this unsure move.

    If Bxc4, Nxc4 wins a pieces, and bxc4 is not good after Bh6. 1. h4 f6 which win a piece after 2.Nxh7 Bxf4 3.Nxf8 Qxf8 or Kxf8.
    If the bishop retreat, Bc2, Be2 and Bf1, the same things as bxc4 happen. If Ne6 instead of Nxh7, Bxe6 wins a pieces or a rook.
    Now you will just win the exchange. It may let him a draw.-

    15 Nd2, only move. 15.. Bh6. White should just give the exchange with Nf3, but he is not okay, he just have hopes. 16. Nxh7 ?? (A really poor move, you are better to lose the excahnge then a piece and you open the h file for black..... How bad.

    let's see the rest.

    16.. Kxh7. 17. Rf1. (Here the rook do nothing. better gone.) Qd7 18 Ng3 Qg5 19. Be2 Bg4 ( You take your time.) 20. Rb2 (it look hopeless, Qh4 should have been done right after Ng3.. 20.. Nd3.. A big mistake. You are too generous with your enemy, you give him back the will to fight. (the plan was slow, Qh4 and Rh8 were better. look at this. )


    Wonderfull position for attack the ennemy, you should win easily.

    But you made a mistake. Nd3 ? 23. Qxd3 Bg7 24. Rbb1. ( You lost much of that attack, and white could sac the exchange with Qd2 Black is a little better after Bd7... or Bd4...
    24.. Bd4+ 25. Kh1, (There is no threat and white is okay. 25.. Bd7 26 Bf3 ? Give back the some attack to black. 26.. Kg7, Black is now a good position, but not winning.

    27 Nd2 Bf4 28. Ng2 ?? A third mistake the defense g3 was important. now this allow Black to attack the poor white king. Here, white is forced to play Bh5 then h3, the pawn is protected by the queen and excahing two rook for the queen is not good, but do not matter here, with a heatly extra piece. 28.. Rh8 now white see himself dommed on the defense with a piece behind



    You opponent played g3 and lost faster..Both Rxh2 and Qxg3 mate, they the same mate, Rx2 is faster but not best..

    Here they are, my toughts,

    Still a good game by both player, mistake are excepted from you both, but I hope you learn now.
  13. 28 May '09 13:29
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    aaaawesome my friend, truly aaaaaawesome, people is it not beautiful!

    position after 11....Nxe5 look at this, white has no outposts for his knights, while black has e5 and d4!

    [fen]r3qrk1/1p1b1pbp/p2p1np1/2pPn1N1/2P1PB2/2N5/PP2B1PP/R2Q1RK1 w - - 0 13[/fen]
    Isn't Nf3 a good move here for white? The e5 knight has no decent squares and once it is exchanged/chased to h6 or something, white has good chances of making e5 happen.
  14. 28 May '09 13:56 / 1 edit
    i dunno, for black is under no duress to to exchange his knight, for if white takes it, with either Bxe5 or Nf3 Nxe5 can black not simply play dxe5 thus relieving himself of the potentially weak d pawn and securing d4 for himself again. one must ask, what has white gained from this? my evaluation was simply based on the static elements, which as you are aware, may change
  15. Standard member agentreno
    Addicted
    28 May '09 15:34
    Well technically White has gained a protected passed pawn and chances for dynamic play with d6 since Black hasn't set up a blockade for the passed pawn at d6. d4 is a nice outpost but it is a long way from being occupied by Black.

    After 12. Nf3 Nh5 13. Bxe5 dxe5


    What do you think of 14. Rb1 f5 15. b4 Nf6 16. bxc5 Nxe4 17. Nxe4 fxe4 18. Ng5



    Not the only way to play it admittedly, but I think I prefer White here.