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  1. 06 Jan '03 21:55 / 3 edits
    As promised earlier in the general forum, here's the moves of my game against Gazza. Enjoy!

    Gary Kasparov - David Tebb
    Chester Simul, May 1989
    Kings Indian Defence

    1.c4 [I was going to try the Marshall Attack against e4, and the Benko Gambit against d4. No way was I going to defend! I forgot about the English] 1...Nf6 [I still hoped he'd change his mind and play d4] 2.Nc3 g6 [I realised I wasn't going to get a Benko] 3.e4 [And that rules out the Gruenfeld] 3...d6 4.d4 Bg7 [So we now have a King's Indian Defence, in which Kasparov is recognised as the World's leading expert. Great!] 5.Be2 0–0 6.Nf3 Nbd7 [I decided to avoid the fiendishly complicated main line which starts with ..Nc6. Maybe next time, Gary!] 7.0–0 e5 8.Qc2 c6 9.Rd1 exd4 10.Nxd4 Re8 [I'm playing all the moves black uses to combat the fianchetto system. What do you mean, white hasn't fianchettoed? He might do later! Haven't you heard of prophylactics?] 11.Bf4 Qe7 12.Nf5? [Aagghh... Where did that come from?] 12...gxf5 13.Bxd6 Qd8 14.exf5 [Ok the dust has settled. Let's evaluate the position. White has 2 pawns for the piece, an initiative, the possibility of a kingside attack. Black is cramped and underdeveloped. Not enough my friend!] 14...Qb6 [I had to get out of that pin] 15.b4 [He doesn't want to let me breathe] 15...a5 [Otherwise black will suffocate] 16.Rab1 Qa7 [Ok, it may look like black is grovelling...] 17.b5 a4 ... [but at least white's attacking on the queenside and not trying for mate] 18.Bf3 [Why didn't he try g4 at some point?] 18...Ne5! [Kasparov looked shocked by this strong move. I'm allowing him to get a rook to the back rank with check, but I'd seen it wasn't dangerous!] 19.Bxe5 Rxe5 20.Rd8+ [He probably thought he was winning] 20...Ne8! [Much better than the alternatives] 21.bxc6 bxc6 22.Bxc6 Bxf5! [This was the move I'd pinned my hope on. It wins.] 23.Rxa8 Qxa8? [My only slip. I had an easier win with ..Bxc2] 24.Qxf5 Qxc6 25.Qd3 Qe6 [A grandmaster criticised me for not trying to swap the queens off with ...Qg6. But I was having too much fun to do anything like that ] 26.Kf1 a3 27.Nd5 Re4 [Now I'm ready to cut his rook off with ..Bb2] 28.Qxa3 [So he thought he'd better take the pawn] 28...Rxc4 29.Ne7+ Kh8 30.Rb8 [You can never relax against this guy] 30...Qd7 31.g3 Re4 [With a double threat of winning another piece and mate! He stared at the position, pulled a few faces, grunted, and held out his hand in resignation] 0–1



    Dave
  2. 06 Jan '03 22:28
    Only the one "" smiley? What's wrong with you man! I think it rather deserves a nice long string of 'em!!



    Mark
  3. 07 Jan '03 02:00
    nice.....
  4. Donation !~TONY~!
    1...c5!
    07 Jan '03 02:59
    Wowie.....crap is all I can say! WHOOOO! Here's your string of smiley faces!
  5. Donation fexkorn
    Dad
    07 Jan '03 04:50
    That's impressive David. If I had that on my resume you could bet it would have been advertised on my profile from day 1! Great game. I enjoyed reading it.
  6. Standard member hayz
    King of ... Stuff
    07 Jan '03 05:50
    I had to make some changes to import the pgn into chessmaster 9000... in case anyone else wants:

    [White "Kasparov"]
    [Black "David Tebb"]
    [Result "0-1"]

    1.c4 {I was going to try the Marshall Attack against e4, and the Benko
    Gambit against d4. No way was I going to defend! I forgot about the
    English} 1...Nf6 {I still hoped he'd change his mind and play d4} 2.Nc3
    g6 {I realised I wasn't going to get a Benko} 3.e4 {And that rules out
    the Gruenfeld} 3...d6 4.d4 Bg7 {So we now have a King's Indian Defence,
    in which Kasparov is recognised as the World's leading expert. Great!}
    5.Be2 O-O 6.Nf3 Nbd7 {I decided to avoid the fiendishly complicated main
    line which starts with ..Nc6. Maybe next time, Gary!} 7.O-O e5 8.Qc2 c6
    9.Rd1 exd4 10.Nxd4 Re8 {I'm playing all the moves black uses to combat
    the fianchetto system. What do you mean, white hasn't fianchettoed? He
    might do later! Haven't you heard of prophylactics?} 11.Bf4 Qe7 12.Nf5 {
    ? Aagghh... Where did that come from?} 12...gxf5 13.Bxd6 Qd8 14.exf5 {Ok
    the dust has settled. Let's evaluate the position. White has 2 pawns for
    the piece, an initiative, the possibility of a kingside attack. Black is
    cramped and underdeveloped. Not enough my friend!} 14...Qb6 {I had to
    get out of that pin} 15.b4 {He doesn't want to let me breathe} 15...a5 {
    Otherwise black will suffocate} 16.Rab1 Qa7 {Ok, it may look like black
    is grovelling...} 17.b5 a4 {but at least white's attacking on the
    queenside and not trying for mate} 18.Bf3 {Why didn't he try g4 at some
    point?} 18...Ne5 {! Kasparov looked shocked by this strong move. I'm
    allowing him to get a rook to the back rank with check, but I'd seen it
    wasn't dangerous!} 19.Bxe5 Rxe5 20.Rd8+ {He probably thought he was
    winning} 20...Ne8 {! Much better than the alternatives} 21.bxc6 bxc6
    22.Bxc6 Bxf5 {! This was the move I'd pinned my hope on. It wins.}
    23.Rxa8 Qxa8 {? My only slip. I had an easier win with ..Bxc2} 24.Qxf5
    Qxc6 25.Qd3 Qe6 {A grandmaster criticised me for not trying to swap the
    queens off with ...Qg6. But I was having too much fun to do anything
    like that } 26.Kf1 a3 27.Nd5 Re4 {Now I'm ready to cut his rook off with
    ..Bb2} 28.Qxa3 {So he thought he'd better take the pawn} 28...Rxc4
    29.Ne7+ Kh8 30.Rb8 {You can never relax against this guy} 30...Qd7 31.g3
    Re4 {With a double threat of winning another piece and mate! He stared
    at the position, pulled a few faces, grunted, and held out his hand in
    resignation} 0-1
  7. 15 Jan '03 02:45 / 1 edit
    Tebbo! Finally got round to taking a closer look at the posted game. Ta very much for writing it up, as well as giving informative (and entertaining!!) notes. Some assistance needed though. It's all a bit beyond me!

    I wasn't sure what "I'm playing all the moves used to combat the Fianchetto system" means. In what way do black's moves help to combat this system, as opposed to any other moves in a King's Indian Defence? (Not demanding anything in depth here, I just yearn for a little more understanding about the motives and aims and things behind opening moves).

    White's move, 11.Bf4, deviates from the book opening. Why play this as opposed to the book move Bf5? And why does black play Qe7 in response to this? Is it simply in order to develop a little or is there something going on here - is Qe7 a move *because* white played Bf4, and if so why?

    Kasparov's 12th move, Nf5, well, I'd never have thought of playing that! After 14.exf5 you said that the compensation gained by white for the loss of the piece wasn't enough. Is that comment on the back of how the game turned out, or did you know there and then right after the move that it wasn't enough? I mean, should one find this fairly obvious at the time, or was it more of a gut feeling that black still held the advantage, or were you just not sure how it would pan out?

    I'm not getting the threat behind 15.b4, and hence why black has to play 15...a5 "otherwise black will suffocate". I'm trying to find how this suffocation would occur if black played something else but am, erm, failing to do so.

    Instead of 16...Qa7 why not simply 16...axb4 17.Rxb4 Qd8. This leaves the rook with a certain menace about it I suppose but is it not better for the queen to find itself on d8 as opposed to a7? 16...axb4 seems to simplify matters down the queenside, and simplification is a good thing if ahead in material (which black is), non?

    18...Ne5 is a corker of a move. Did Kasparov miss this move? I mean, 18.Bd3 has the threat of winning a pawn but it's a bit of a cheap shot. 18.Rb4 seems altogether more interesting since Black would probably have to play 18...Nc5 to protect a4 and *then* white could play Bd3 and black wouldn't be able to play Ne5 since he just moved it to c5 instead!

    That'll do for now! Thanks for any help anyone can give

    Mark
  8. Standard member Ala
    The Substitute
    15 Jan '03 14:37
    David,
    As a relative newcomer to chess and RHP, I just wanted to say a huge THANK YOU for your description of your game!
    I enjoyed it more than I realized I would...and it got my thirst going for reading more game transcripts.
    Thanks again for sharing this...
    Cheers,
    ala
  9. 15 Jan '03 15:01
    Originally posted by T1000
    Tebbo! Finally got round to taking a closer look at the posted game. Ta very much for writing it up, as well as giving informative (and entertaining!!) notes. Some assistance needed though. It's all a bit beyond me!

    I wasn't sure what "I'm playing all the moves used to combat the Fianchetto system" means. In what way do black's moves help to combat th ...[text shortened]... t moved it to c5 instead!

    That'll do for now! Thanks for any help anyone can give

    Mark
    Ok Mark, as you've taken the trouble to go through the game, I'll try to answer all your questions:-

    1) I simply meant that black's chosen a set-up similar to the most popular line in the g3 (fianchetto) system, ie. ..e5, ..c6, ..Nbd7, ..Re8 etc. If you look up the main lines of the g3 system, you'll see what I mean.

    2) White's move 11.Bf4 deviates from the book. Why did he choose it? Probably because he forgot the theory! Before he made this move, he spent a lot of time staring into space, suggesting he was having difficulty recalling either the book moves or his own analysis...

    The best move for white is probably 11.f3. This is a useful move, solidly defending e4, and keeping white's options open for where to develop the bishop.

    3) I played 11..Qe7 to remove the queen from the same file as white's rook, to avoid nasty tactics (I thought) and enable my knight to safely move to a better square. I assumed he would defend e4 with f3, admitting his previous move was inaccurate.

    4) When he played Nf5, I thought I was going to get smashed! However after I analysed a few lines I saw there was no immediate kill and realised the sacrifice was made intuitively and might actually be a little dubious.
    I found out after the game that a grandmaster in the commentary room had descibed the sacrifice as brilliant and suggested Kasparov had worked it all out in his home analysis. He told the audience he expected Kasparov to crush me in a few moves.
    A few years later I saw the game quoted in an opening book on the King's Indian. The author simply dismissed Nf5 with a question mark.
    So nothing was (or is) obvoius at all - the sac was reasonable for a simul and could even have been sound if followed up better.

    5) 15.b4 was unpleasant because it took away the important ..c5 square from black, restricting my pieces, and leaving me little room to move. I felt black had to fight for space - do nothing and I would 'suffocate'.
    Why did I need to play 15..a5? White was preparing to play c5 or Na4 to harrass, and possibly win my queen. I had to give her a safe square to retreat to.

    6) Why would I want to play 16..axb4 17. Rxb4 Qd8? The queen has just moved from d8! The whole point of going to b6 in the first place was to remove the queen from the 'd' file, in order to enable my knight to move from d7, and complete my queenside development.

    I agree that simplification is in black's interests, but if it means losing time and having to bring the queen back to d8, then the cost is too great!

    7) I think you meant 18.Bf3 was a cheap shot. Yes, he either missed 18..Ne5, or badly underestimated it.
    18.Rb4 does seem more dangerous. I probably would have played 18..Nc5 19.Bf3 Bd7 with an unclear position.

    Congratulations for improving on Kasparov!

    8) What about the rest of the game then? Why stop just when black's on top?

    Dave

  10. 22 Jan '03 14:26
    OK, I"m still none the wiser, what exactly is a simul game?
  11. 22 Jan '03 14:33
    Joe, Dave T posted the following in the thread that was over in the general forum, guess you must have missed it! Anyway, here it is:-

    06 Jan '03 13:37

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Originally posted by kyngj
    Ok, for us shambling chess novices out there, what is a simul game?

    Joe
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    A simul (it's short for simultaneous) is an exhibition in which a top player (usually a master or grandmaster) takes on many people at the same time.
    The boards are arranged in a circle or rectangle, with the master going round and moving on each board in turn.
    Sometimes the master chooses to have White on every board, sometimes he or she alternates colours.
    The players have to make their move at the exact time the master comes to them.

    I was lucky enough to be invited to play against Kasparov, with about 30 others, when he came to Chester, England in 1989.
    Kasparov drew 2 games, lost 2 (one to me ) but won the rest.

    I hope that answers your question.

    Dave

    --------------------


  12. 22 Jan '03 19:11
    I lived in Holland (Nederland) for a number of years and also played numerous of those simul games. I used to go into amsterdam every saturday where a grandmaster (or high rated player) would take on all comers. (rectangle, 30 boards, GM in the middle, playing the 30 games in a row). I loved it. (and no I never won)
  13. 30 Jan '03 22:03
    Thanks Mark, and thanks Dave, I never did find the reply in the general forum... Ok, I'm thinking of setting up a simul in northern New England. I'm going to set up 30 boards, and anyone who wants to play me can come and challenge. There is one catch however, when I come back to your board and make my move, you have to take a tequila shot each time, before making your move... I'm hoping that by the time the opening is done I should have no trouble in mopping everyone up!

    :p

    joe
  14. 30 Jan '03 22:44
    Hmmm, now there's a thought. Chess drinking games? There must be some...
  15. 31 Jan '03 14:31
    presumably you'll be drinking a shot every move you make aswell....i think they'll be mopping you up ..!! hic