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  1. 17 Apr '07 19:44
    Hi folks. New to the site and not a very experienced chess player. Looking for a few basic tips to help get me started on building a strong game play.

    Duder
  2. 17 Apr '07 19:53
    Castle early.

    Stay observant.

    When you decide to make a move, STOP. Look again and see if there's a better one.

    Don't underestimate your opponent.

    Do not play tired.

    Seize open files with your rooks.

    Connect the rooks.

    Eh...

    Don't block your own bishop's with pawns.

    Queen = 9
    Rook= 5
    Bishop = 3.5
    Knight = 3
    Pawn = 1

    Pawns are VERY valuable in the endgame.




    I really don't give good advice. ^.^
  3. 17 Apr '07 19:57
    Originally posted by azalin76
    Castle early.

    Stay observant.

    When you decide to make a move, STOP. Look again and see if there's a better one.

    Don't underestimate your opponent.

    Do not play tired.

    Seize open files with your rooks.

    Connect the rooks.

    Eh...

    Don't block your own bishop's with pawns.

    Queen = 9
    Rook= 5
    Bishop = 3.5
    Knight = 3
    Pawn = 1

    Pawns are VERY valuable in the endgame.




    I really don't give good advice. ^.^
    Thanks. Any advice I can get at this point will help a great deal.
    But what does seize open files mean?
    And what is connect the rooks?

    I very briefly played chess many many years ago and wasn't any good at it then.
  4. Standard member bannedplayer306509
    Best Loser
    17 Apr '07 19:59
    Originally posted by Dudermooner
    Thanks. Any advice I can get at this point will help a great deal.
    But what does seize open files mean?
    And what is connect the rooks?

    I very briefly played chess many many years ago and wasn't any good at it then.
    Squares that connect vertically are files. Squares that connect horizontally are ranks.
    Connecting the rooks is often part of castling. You put the rooks in positions where they support each other.
  5. 17 Apr '07 20:00
    Connecting the rooks, means like, have them where they cover and protect eachother, if a rook can protect another rook, that rook can protect the otherone as well.

    Open files, spots where the Rook gains more mobility and power, usually in the center, because those pieces typically get pushed first.

    Don't use the rooks TOO early. And don't use the Queen too early, either.

    Back to work with me!
  6. 17 Apr '07 20:02
    Originally posted by ih8sens
    Squares that connect vertically are files. Squares that connect horizontally are ranks.
    Connecting the rooks is often part of castling. You put the rooks in positions where they support each other.
    Ahhhh. This would be a good start at figuring out what's going on. I don't remember chess being so complicated. Mind you I don't remember much from my youth at all.

    I have been starting games from the open invites area. Is it typical for players to prefer being white? Does playing as black have a disadvantage?
  7. 17 Apr '07 20:05
    Originally posted by azalin76
    Connecting the rooks, means like, have them where they cover and protect eachother, if a rook can protect another rook, that rook can protect the otherone as well.

    Open files, spots where the Rook gains more mobility and power, usually in the center, because those pieces typically get pushed first.

    Don't use the rooks TOO early. And don't use the Queen too early, either.

    Back to work with me!
    Thanks. Exactly the kind of pointers I was looking for.
  8. 17 Apr '07 20:07
    Another question, is it typically good to trade queen for queen early on if the option becomes available or is it best to hold back and keep the queens in play?
  9. Standard member Dutch Defense
    Stealer of Souls
    17 Apr '07 20:07
    Originally posted by Dudermooner
    Hi folks. New to the site and not a very experienced chess player. Looking for a few basic tips to help get me started on building a strong game play.

    Duder
    Welcome to the site! My only advice is to pick an opening and stick with it. As you win more games with it, you can "test" more openings. Also, read your opponent's profile.
  10. 17 Apr '07 20:13 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Dutch Defense
    Welcome to the site! My only advice is to pick an opening and stick with it. As you win more games with it, you can "test" more openings. Also, read your opponent's profile.
    I'm assuming that would be easier done as white would it not? Or does black have it's own advantagious openings as well. As I said I'm rather new to all this.

    Thanks for the welcome.
  11. Standard member Dutch Defense
    Stealer of Souls
    17 Apr '07 20:15
    Originally posted by Dudermooner
    I'm assuming that would be easier done as white would it not? Or does black have it's own advantagious openings as well. As I said I'm rather new to all this.
    You need to find something to play against 1.e4, 1.d4, 1.c4, 1.f4, etc.
  12. 17 Apr '07 20:23
    Originally posted by Dudermooner
    Hi folks. New to the site and not a very experienced chess player. Looking for a few basic tips to help get me started on building a strong game play.

    Duder
    Dudermooner - like the name, welcome to the great game

    The problem with seeking advice in this way (believe me there is a wealth of good advice on this site) is that your first lessons in chess need to be coherent, and structured. Having read this thread, if I was beginning, I would be rather confused as to what my priorities should be, even though the individual contributions are good.

    Go to the book store, and buy a basic introduction to chess. Take your time, and get to know the basics. You need to learn a little about openings, endgames, and the middlegame, all at the same time. You then learn by playing, as long as you are willing to lose, and learn what went wrong. You can then buy some more advanced books and go from there.
    I recommend 'Chess for Dummies' (search the net) - the title is insulting but it is an excellent 'starting from scratch' text, which is easy to follow, and uses diagrams to take you on a journey through the basics.
    Good luck - come back and play me when you think you're hard enough (joke)
  13. 17 Apr '07 20:41
    Originally posted by Policestate
    Dudermooner - like the name, welcome to the great game

    The problem with seeking advice in this way (believe me there is a wealth of good advice on this site) is that your first lessons in chess need to be coherent, and structured. Having read this thread, if I was beginning, I would be rather confused as to what my priorities should be, even though t ...[text shortened]... the basics.
    Good luck - come back and play me when you think you're hard enough (joke)
    HA! Way ahead of you on this one. Been searching some online tutorials. It definitely is a lot to take in. I don't think I'll ever make it to a strong player. I recently suffered a head injury at work and my doctor suggested keeping my mind busy with puzzles and the sort. So I thought chess would classify as a brain stimulator. Looks like I might be in over my head a bit here but I have lots of time on my hands as of late and I do enjoy a good challenge. This may prove to be just what the doctor ordered.



    Is it just me or are the little smiley faces a bit creepy?
  14. 17 Apr '07 20:47
    A better idea would be to find one of the many existing discussions or "threads" on the subject and then ask relevant questions. Why do newbies insist on asking the same questions over and over and over....
  15. 17 Apr '07 20:52
    Originally posted by z00t
    [b]A better idea would be to find one of the many existing discussions or "threads" on the subject and then ask relevant questions. Why do newbies insist on asking the same questions over and over and over....[/b]
    It's the "conspiracy of the newbies". If we do some detective work, I think we can find the ringleader...