Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. Standard member Patanjali
    Grand Poobah
    17 Jul '08 02:47
    I stumbled upon this while surfing the web: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/index.html

    Check out the "Handbook of Chess" directly below the picture of Frank Marshall on the main page.

    There is this quote, "When a player fails to cry “check” his adversary need not unless he likes move his king out of check, nor even cover him."

    When I read that I remember when I was a boy and my father was teaching me to play chess. He told me that if you didn't say "check" when you placed your opponent in check, then the rules of check didn't apply.

    I completely forgot about this until I saw this article. Has anyone else ever heard of this before?
  2. Standard member eldragonfly
    leperchaun messiah
    17 Jul '08 02:59
    No.
  3. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Gonzalo de Córdoba
    17 Jul '08 03:00
    Originally posted by Patanjali
    I stumbled upon this while surfing the web: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/index.html

    Check out the "Handbook of Chess" directly below the picture of Frank Marshall on the main page.

    There is this quote, "When a player fails to cry “check” his adversary need not unless he likes move his king out of check, nor even cover him."

    When I read that ...[text shortened]... forgot about this until I saw this article. Has anyone else ever heard of this before?
    The only think like it is in blitz, where if he doesn't move the king you take it and win.
  4. Standard member irontigran
    Rob Scheider is..
    17 Jul '08 03:12
    Originally posted by Patanjali
    I stumbled upon this while surfing the web: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/index.html

    Check out the "Handbook of Chess" directly below the picture of Frank Marshall on the main page.

    There is this quote, "When a player fails to cry “check” his adversary need not unless he likes move his king out of check, nor even cover him."

    When I read that ...[text shortened]... forgot about this until I saw this article. Has anyone else ever heard of this before?
    at higher levels saying check can be offensive, so you dont really need to.. lower players at my club say it every time and look at me as if theyre expecting it from me so ill say it if they seem easy
  5. 17 Jul '08 03:44 / 1 edit
    There have been odd rules at times so it's possible.However,some rubbish little handbooks have been printed early 1900's,I think this is one of such.I would be happy to have it in my collection but wouldn't trust it's content.Did you read the rest?

    "The rook (also called the castle) moves horizontally the entire length of the board, if the space is open.’ (Page 7)" Only horizontal?Was that normal in 1902??I don't think so.

    "‘Perpetual check is when the king can be placed in check at almost every move. When this is the case the weaker side can demand checkmate in any given number of moves. If his opponent fails to do this it can then pass as a drawn game.’ (Page 11)" ALMOST every move?Weaker side can DEMAND checkmate??Think I don't even understand this....

    "Castling often improves the situation when the game is crowded.’ (Page 15)" Right.Uhuh.Sure!

    "The Allgaier Gambit: ‘It is not a safe opening, although, if successful, it will prove a strong one.’ (Page 25)" If successful it will prove strong?!Brilliant!!

    "A great point to be observed in finishing a game, is, never to allow the king to escape into the centre of the board.’ (Page 31)." Very insightful indeed!

  6. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    17 Jul '08 05:00
    Originally posted by Patanjali
    I stumbled upon this while surfing the web: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/index.html

    Check out the "Handbook of Chess" directly below the picture of Frank Marshall on the main page.

    There is this quote, "When a player fails to cry “check” his adversary need not unless he likes move his king out of check, nor even cover him."

    When I read that ...[text shortened]... forgot about this until I saw this article. Has anyone else ever heard of this before?
    Yes. Although the movement of the pieces have been consistent for about 500 years (in the 1500+ years of the game), many other rules have changed quite a bit. Even so, Edward Winter's point regarding this particular 1902 publication is that it may well have been significantly out of date even then.

    Out of context, "A great point to be observed in finishing a game, is, never to allow the king to escape into the centre of the board," is a real howler. In the context of explaining how to mate with two clerics, on the other hand, it might bear some kernel of wisdom.

    Murray's A History of Chess (1913) runs through many of the rules changes through the centuries.
  7. 17 Jul '08 09:52
    Well, sometimes i play against weaker players, and they say that I must say check if i give it, otherwise it is against the 'rules'. In this case i tell them that i a tournament, saying check is actually considered disruptive; saying check is not mandatory. If he disagrees, I comply, and never play them again.

    I have also had situations where they have wierd variations on the en passant and castling rules. I've had:
    - During castling the rook and king swap places
    - During castling the two rooks swap places (WTF?)
    - You are not allowed to move two pieces on the same move (they are unaware of castling)
    - Pawns can move horizontally on the fifth rank (right...)
    - Pawns can take vertical/horizontal on the fifth rank
    - En passant is a French rule, we are not playing with those rules.

    In these situations, if I'm up material (a lot) I play on with the 'new rules'. Otherwise I tell them the proper rule (once) and if they tell me I'm wrong, I tell them that I resign the game and walk off, refusing to play them again.

    The most annoying opponent i had was when i had the winning side of a KNBK and he demanded that checkmate had to be given in 50 moves, otherwise it was a draw. I was fine with that, but he counted a move for every half-move played.

    Also, when you refuse to play them by any wierd rules, they tell you that you are avoiding losing against them and that you are not a good player. That makes me want to hit them. I should really get a pocket rulebook of chess, it could come in handy sometime.

    That's just my experiences.
  8. 17 Jul '08 10:26 / 1 edit
    The rule in force 150 or so years ago which would confuse most of us is the one about which side goes first - sometimes it was White and sometimes Black! I think this would disorientate us in the opening more than you might think.
  9. 17 Jul '08 11:26
    Quote: - Pawns can move horizontally on the fifth rank
    - Pawns can take vertical/horizontal on the fifth rank

    Brilliant!Love it!

    I got a nice 'special houserule' too.I once played a bloke who opened 1.c3/f3.Mind you,this is 1 single white move!He interpreted the rules on pawns like this: on the first move you can move a pawn up 1 or 2 squares OR 2 pawns 1 square each!

    I won
  10. 17 Jul '08 12:38
    Regarding new/old rules.

    Never ever try to take en passant in a pub gme against a
    complete stranger. Best piece of advice I have ever given.

    It will end in bloodshed. Trust me on this.
  11. 17 Jul '08 13:04 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Regarding new/old rules.

    Never ever try to take en passant in a pub gme against a
    complete stranger. Best piece of advice I have ever given.

    It will end in bloodshed. Trust me on this.
    I know what you mean - I don't even castle in pub games!

    (Edit: Unless they do first - and then I copy whatever method they used, usually swapping the position of the king and rook).
  12. Standard member Phlabibit
    Mystic Meg
    17 Jul '08 13:05
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Regarding new/old rules.

    Never ever try to take en passant in a pub gme against a
    complete stranger. Best piece of advice I have ever given.

    It will end in bloodshed. Trust me on this.
    Hear hear! I usually tell them the rule but don't take the pawn.

    "Just so you know!"

    Also, if they touch a piece, I will tell them by rule they must move that piece. You don't need to now, but just know "By rule you must move that piece".

    If they argue either point, though I didn't force the issue I offer a 50 dollar bet if they like. They don't take the bet at that point.

    P-
  13. 17 Jul '08 14:08
    I recall when I was learning many years ago that someone told me, or I read, that you should never say 'check' but 'ch', and not 'checkmate' but 'mate'. I always thought it odd, and can't for the life of me remember where I got it from.
  14. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    17 Jul '08 14:35
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Regarding new/old rules.

    Never ever try to take en passant in a pub gme against a
    complete stranger. Best piece of advice I have ever given.

    It will end in bloodshed. Trust me on this.
    ROTFLMAO!
  15. Subscriber Ponderable
    chemist
    17 Jul '08 16:32
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    I know what you mean - I don't even castle in pub games!

    (Edit: Unless they do first - and then I copy whatever method they used, usually swapping the position of the king and rook).
    Actually I try to clear up all the rules I think got confused most:

    * You may not open by moving two pawns simultaneoulsy.
    * Castling works only as described in the rules.
    * en passant
    * A piece must promoted directly and you may promote to any piece not only those which have been taken beforehand (this one is a real big issue with some: "Hey you can't have two Queens, you can have back your Knight!"