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  1. 25 Dec '08 20:22
    What are the best opening moves and why?
  2. 25 Dec '08 20:35
    It all depends on your style first you must tell us what positions you like are you more comfortable in closed positions open ones are you a tactical player a positional player.There is no one opening that is more dominant than all the others.
  3. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    25 Dec '08 20:36 / 2 edits
    e4 if you're a MAN

    d4 if you're a wuss

    Nf3 if you're indecisive

    Nc3 if you like to transpose into boring openings

    f4 if you're a POLAR BEAR < grrrrr >

    ...

    In all seriousness, e4 is good because it opens diagonals for the queen and light bishop and establishes control of the center. This opening usually leads to a more "open" game.

    d4 is good because it establishes control of the center, frees the dark bishop and, unlike e4, doesn't require another move to protect the pawn. Because the queen is not free to move out along a diagonal, this usually leads to a less open game.

    Nf3 is a solid developing move, which you'll want to do anyway eventually, that postpones the decision of how to move your central pawns until you see what your opponent does.

    c4 is similar to d4, though not as common, because it doesn't discourage black from playing e5, which is a good opening move for black; but c4 has it plusses. Very often, white ends up with pawns on c4 and d4 anyway and it doesn't matter which one is played first.

    Nc3 and f4 are less common (I think), but are still solid moves because they help establish control over the center.

    All other moves are either offbeat or plain bad.

    Personally, I think that if you're learning the game, you're best off playing e4 as it give you a better chance to learn tactics.
  4. 25 Dec '08 20:40
    b4 if you like to surprise less experienced players in blitz!
  5. 25 Dec '08 20:41
    e4 is much more tactical and d4 is more positional. It can be argued that as an e4 player you have to memorize more theory and it tends to have much sharper lines. Sicilian, ruy lopez have very complicated games. I would say a beginner should learn e4 or d4 and nothing else. Then later you can try other stuff.
  6. 27 Dec '08 21:46
    Originally posted by kmac27
    e4 is much more tactical and d4 is more positional.
    As a generalization that is certainly true. A major exception to the rule is the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit: 1 d4 d5 2 e4!? de 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 f3 ef 5 Nf3. I've enjoyed many spectacular wins (and have suffered many spectacular defeats) with this opening in blitz games.
  7. 27 Dec '08 21:58 / 1 edit
    Far less well-known that the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit is the Curry Opening. This opening was invented by a chess expert named Ronald Curry, and is discussed in his book, Win at Chess. It often leads to early fireworks. Basically, it's a Torre Attack in which White castles long. Here's the basic setup that White tries to achieve in the Curry Opening:



    It's a fun opening, and can probably be played against all of the major defenses to 1 d4.
  8. 28 Dec '08 02:04
    Originally posted by gaychessplayer
    Far less well-known that the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit is the Curry Opening. This opening was invented by a chess expert named Ronald Curry, and is discussed in his book, Win at Chess. It often leads to early fireworks. Basically, it's a Torre Attack in which White castles long. Here's the basic setup that White tries to achieve in the Curry O ...[text shortened]...

    It's a fun opening, and can probably be played against all of the major defenses to 1 d4.
    That is most effective when black fails to show up.
  9. 28 Dec '08 04:45
    Originally posted by gaychessplayer
    Far less well-known that the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit is the Curry Opening. This opening was invented by a chess expert named Ronald Curry, and is discussed in his book, Win at Chess. It often leads to early fireworks. Basically, it's a Torre Attack in which White castles long. Here's the basic setup that White tries to achieve in the Curry O ...[text shortened]...

    It's a fun opening, and can probably be played against all of the major defenses to 1 d4.
    Looking for a system that works against all defenses is terrible.That is a passive opening where white just doesn't want to lose. White hasn't seized much of the board and isn't even fighting for the opponents territory.

    Learn the openings that you like and learn how to manipulate moves to get into positions that favor your skills. A friend of bobby fischers once asked if bobby could teach him how to play chess. Fischers reply was, ok, first read through every line in MCO. He then read every line in MCO and came back to fischer. He said I"m ready for my next lesson. Fischer told him ok lesson two read the entire MCO a second time.

    This is because there is no cure all to play one universal opening. White should fight for an advantage. If black comes out even in the middle game then white has not done his job.
  10. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    28 Dec '08 05:45
    Originally posted by odoodsdudes
    What are the best opening moves and why?
    I'd agree with sh76. I would add however if you plan to play e4 or d4, be prepared to see A LOT of different defences against them. If opening book study is not your definition of "fun", then you might try Nf3 or c4, this cuts down on having to get quite so "booked up"
  11. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    28 Dec '08 14:59 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sh76
    f4 if you're a POLAR BEAR < grrrrr >
    polar bear grrrrwwlll!



  12. 30 Dec '08 22:17
    Wat is MCO?
  13. 31 Dec '08 02:55
    Originally posted by Mindman123
    Wat is MCO?
    MCO = Modern Chess Openings. The 15th(!) edition just came out this year. It is edited by GM Nick DeFirmian. I bought a copy from Border's Books and Music last week. I've also seen it at Barnes and Noble. It covers all of the major openings, but with very little explanatory text. It's mostly columns and columns of variations, with an evaluation at the end of each line. I think it's a 'must-have" for any player rated 1200+.
  14. 31 Dec '08 03:06
    Originally posted by kmac27
    Looking for a system that works against all defenses is terrible.That is a passive opening where white just doesn't want to lose. White hasn't seized much of the board and isn't even fighting for the opponents territory.
    Actually, I believe for some players that finding a system playable against virtually any defense is a great idea. Even though Fritz 8-Gazillion and every GM who ever was, is, or will be alive think that the opening allows Black to quickly equalize, that by itself is not a reason to avoid this opening. Most of the games I've played with the Curry Opening are interesting struggles where castling on opposite sides is common. And even if the position is 'objectively" equal, the player who plays the Curry Opening often will be better aquainted with the patters and motifs that the opening tends to generate. So, I think that openings like the Curry Opening give the player excellent practical chances.

    BTW, "theory" says that the Smith-Morra Gambit (1 e4 c5 2 d4 cd 3 c3 dc 4 Nc3) is suspect, but that doesn't seem to prevent IM Alex Lendermann from beating IM's and GM's with it.

    "Theory" also comdemns the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit as being inferior, but go on practically any database of games and you'll find that White wins about 70%+ of the time. I call that "excellent practical chances."
  15. 31 Dec '08 03:20
    Originally posted by gaychessplayer

    "Theory" also comdemns the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit as being inferior, but go on practically any database of games and you'll find that White wins about 70%+ of the time. I call that "excellent practical chances."
    Okay, I lied. According to the chesslab.com database of over two million games, White wins about 51%, of BDG games, he loses about 34% and draws about 15%. So, if you count draws as half-a-win and half-a-loss, White scores about 58.5%, which is slightly better than "normal" openings, in which White scores about 55%.