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  1. 03 Apr '07 19:30
    I've been dabbling in chess for several years but have only recently begun to take it seriously and study it in earnest. I'm looking around to purchase various books to improve my game and obviously to play on RHP as often as I can.

    With that being said, I won't be able to really study openings for quite a while do to priorities/not being able to find a book about openings that I like that much. So would it be better to play one opening very consistently and learn all the variations of it, or to try out various openings and learn by trial and error? I'm just not sure if playing the Caro Kann for example would be beneficial if I don't know it's regular progressions/variations past the first two moves

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated
  2. 03 Apr '07 19:34
    Originally posted by stockton1984
    I've been dabbling in chess for several years but have only recently begun to take it seriously and study it in earnest. I'm looking around to purchase various books to improve my game and obviously to play on RHP as often as I can.

    With that being said, I won't be able to really study openings for quite a while do to priorities/not being able to fi ...[text shortened]... rogressions/variations past the first two moves

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated
    Stick to a certain opening, use a database to follow the lines, but don't buy a book on it or anything like that.
    Instead you should concentrate on tactics and the endgame before anything else.
  3. 03 Apr '07 19:42
    Originally posted by Bad wolf
    Stick to a certain opening, use a database to follow the lines, but don't buy a book on it or anything like that.
    Instead you should concentrate on tactics and the endgame before anything else.
    Depends on the level you play. Of course tactics is the most important part, but while growing in strength, the need for openings grows as well. Knowing a certain opening and some typical traps in it is very helpful, actually no matter in what level you play.

    If you want a recommendation for a book on openings, I recommend 'Chess Openings for White/Black Explained'. These two books written by L.Alburt, R.Dzindzichashvili and E.Perelshteyn are really nice and easy to understand. They have a nice repertoire of openings deeply analyzed with many traps and even some articles on their history. Unfortunately, they aren't so cheap. I ordered both books together on Amazon and it cost me about 30 euros with the delivery of 2000 km from UK to Latvia.
  4. 03 Apr '07 19:44
    that is true. most books that you buy will have tons of information about the opening and how to go about the middle game. as for now you want to just play solid openings and go from there. when your openings and tactics are better you will find out what kind of player you want to be. if you are an agressive player then playing openings like the sicilian and french openings might be for your if your a person who likes it quiet the ruy lopez and some d4 lines might be for you. d4 lines tend to be more positional as opposed to e4 which is just attack then counter attack by black mostly. best of luck
  5. Standard member Mathurine
    sorozatgyilkos
    03 Apr '07 20:17
    Give this page a try:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_opening

    It's a pretty good (and regularly updated) starting point. Best of all, though, it's free!

    Have a look at this, too:

    http://www.chessgames.com/

    ars longa, vita brevis

    Best of luck,

    Mathurine
  6. 03 Apr '07 21:01
    I don't agree with a previous poster's comments about banging-in moves from databases. I think it's fairly useful to know why you're playing various opening moves, especially if you happen to eventually play an OTB game & have to improvise & actually think
  7. 03 Apr '07 21:05
    Originally posted by stockton1984
    I've been dabbling in chess for several years but have only recently begun to take it seriously and study it in earnest. I'm looking around to purchase various books to improve my game and obviously to play on RHP as often as I can.

    With that being said, I won't be able to really study openings for quite a while do to priorities/not being able to fi ...[text shortened]... rogressions/variations past the first two moves

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated
    Your rating is only around 1000. Please study some basic chess tactic fundementals such as forks, pins, skewers before worrying about opening lines. Trust me.
  8. 03 Apr '07 21:18
    my friend had trouble with the opening even after i explained a lot of the moves. after he studied tactics he understood the opening principles better.
  9. 03 Apr '07 21:42
    Originally posted by kmac27
    my friend had trouble with the opening even after i explained a lot of the moves. after he studied tactics he understood the opening principles better.
    That's no suprise because it's all inter-related.
  10. 03 Apr '07 21:44
    i know i let him borrow attacking chess by josh waitzkin and hes mowing it down.
  11. 03 Apr '07 22:06
    "Discovering Chess Openings" by John Emms is the best openings book I've come across so far. It's not for the complete beginner but it's accessible and covers the basic principles in clear language then goes on to relate this knowledge to a selection of openings. In time you will come to favour particular openings and then go on to study these in more detail and devlop a repertiore that you become familiar with.

    However a well played opening against a good opponent will leave you either even or with a slight advantage or slight disadvantage and the battle will be won with strategy, tactics and endgame skill. Concentrating on tactics and endgame but still allowing some time to study the opening principles would be my recipe for rapid progress.

    I recommend all the books by Yasser Seirawan - the titles are self explanatory and on the web the chess tactics server www.chess.emrald.net is a good place to practice tactics.`
  12. 03 Apr '07 22:15
    Originally posted by Mahout
    "Discovering Chess Openings" by John Emms is the best openings book I've come across so far. It's not for the complete beginner but it's accessible and covers the basic principles in clear language then goes on to relate this knowledge to a selection of openings. In time you will come to favour particular openings and then go on to study these in more detail ...[text shortened]... the web the chess tactics server www.chess.emrald.net is a good place to practice tactics.`
    John Emms is a very good author.
    Also with you on Yasser's books. Play winning chess would be perfect for a player rated 1000 or so, looking for basic understanding & rapid improvement.
  13. 04 Apr '07 01:30
    Originally posted by stockton1984
    I've been dabbling in chess for several years but have only recently begun to take it seriously and study it in earnest. I'm looking around to purchase various books to improve my game and obviously to play on RHP as often as I can.

    With that being said, I won't be able to really study openings for quite a while do to priorities/not being able to fi ...[text shortened]... rogressions/variations past the first two moves

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated
    I believe the "starting out" opening series is good for players rated 1400 to 1600 or 1700 if you're interested.
  14. 05 Apr '07 16:51
    I recommend "Winning Chess Openings" by GM Yasser Seirawan. He explains general opening theory and how they play out in the most common openings. He then suggests an opening repertoire based on the King's Indian Attack, King's Indian Defense and the Pirc Defense.