1. Joined
    25 Jan '10
    Moves
    43423
    19 Nov '14 22:29
    Does anybody on RHP look at players profiles, and take action against players lowering their handicaps deliberately over a short space of time? Or do we just have to put up with cheating?
  2. Joined
    13 Jun '10
    Moves
    28668
    19 Nov '14 23:10
    Are you talking about people who have big peaks and troughs in their profile? You think they resign a whole lot of games to get a low entry score and then join in tournaments.
    Or is it something else?

    The idea of a lowest floor rating comes up in site ideas from time to time. Maybe you should add your voice there to try and get it done

    A different sort of problem happens in long duration tournaments which is that people who are still learning get better and better over the course of the match...

    There is only one way to fight back against that ... 😉
  3. SubscriberBigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    bigdogghouse.com/RHP
    Joined
    26 Nov '04
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    114819
    20 Nov '14 05:421 edit
    Originally posted by danger dave
    Does anybody on RHP look at players profiles, and take action against players lowering their handicaps deliberately over a short space of time? Or do we just have to put up with cheating?
    Just send me the names of the players in question, and I'll be sure to send them lots of chall...erm, take care of the issue for you. 😳
  4. Joined
    25 Jan '10
    Moves
    43423
    20 Nov '14 08:15
    Just look at one of my actual games!
  5. Joined
    15 Jun '10
    Moves
    30767
    21 Nov '14 01:53
    I struggle to understand peoples' attitude to ratings. When I occasionally get myself into a winning position in games, many of my opponents (I would say the great majority) slow the game right down; why do they do this? Okay people don't like losing, that I understand, and ignoring the fact that this this is mean - spirited and not in the spirit in which I think the game should be played, what do they gain by it?
    I am no mathematician and struggle with logic sometimes but is it not true that if one resigns an obviously lost game, thus lowering ones' rating, the next game that one wins gets more points, and the next loss loses less points?
    This has been raised before I know, but I still don't get it really. I would like to appeal to all chain - draggers out there (you know who you are...) to take the hit, respect you opponent and when the game is lost, resign!! A lot more chess could be played this way.
    So my question is; am I right?
  6. Joined
    08 Apr '09
    Moves
    16436
    21 Nov '14 08:37
    Originally posted by Indonesia Phil

    So my question is; am I right?
    No.

    Although the game may end when you think you have a lost game, it is not over when you think you have a won game. There are too many reasons why not to resign, and even playing slower is reasonable. In tough positions, everyone spends more time on thinking. Or gives up, but that is not chess.
  7. Subscribervendaonline
    Dave
    S.Yorks.England
    Joined
    18 Apr '10
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    59184
    21 Nov '14 15:05
    Originally posted by Indonesia Phil
    I struggle to understand peoples' attitude to ratings. When I occasionally get myself into a winning position in games, many of my opponents (I would say the great majority) slow the game right down; why do they do this? Okay people don't like losing, that I understand, and ignoring the fact that this this is mean - spirited and not in the spirit in w ...[text shortened]... ame is lost, resign!! A lot more chess could be played this way.
    So my question is; am I right?
    The best attitude to ratings is to completely ignore them and play each game to the best of your ability.
    The best guide to a players ability is probably the 5 year rating although I think MY 5 year rating was probably a fluke as I've never got anywhere near it since 2011.
    Regarding "lost" games , even the best players will sometimes fall for a stalemate so it may be worth trying to manufacture such a situation.
  8. Joined
    22 Mar '11
    Moves
    42067
    21 Nov '14 18:22
    It is actually not irrational to wait out games when you are lost. First, people make mistakes. Second, people leave the site. These are rational reasons for waiting. On the other hand, the more games you have, the least time/game and not resigning lost games may affect your results in other games. Finally, and this is my main reason for resigning lost games, is that it is depressing looking at these games, having to relive your mistakes.
  9. Standard memberDeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    Cosmopolis
    Joined
    27 Oct '04
    Moves
    78940
    21 Nov '14 18:52
    Originally posted by Indonesia Phil
    I struggle to understand peoples' attitude to ratings. When I occasionally get myself into a winning position in games, many of my opponents (I would say the great majority) slow the game right down; why do they do this? Okay people don't like losing, that I understand, and ignoring the fact that this this is mean - spirited and not in the spirit in w ...[text shortened]... ame is lost, resign!! A lot more chess could be played this way.
    So my question is; am I right?
    I'm much more likely to play slowly when I'm in difficulties than when I'm ahead. As tvochess said, it is a lot easier to find good moves when ahead than when behind. Although sometimes I've found myself in positions where I'm objectively ahead but don't really know what to do with a good position. Really it matters whether I can find a plan or if I'm just limping from move to move - it's normally easier to find a plan when ahead. I'll always resign a clearly lost position promptly, there's no point in doing anything else (the exception to this is when my opponent has a pretty checkmate and I let them play it out, but I'll normally move quickly under those circumstances).
  10. Subscriberlemondrop
    pawn grabber
    Joined
    19 Jul '13
    Moves
    182848
    23 Nov '14 01:54
    I think that the tournament entry rating is a much truer indicator of a player's strength, since it has a floor in place, the TER will never drop more than 100 points from your yearly high no matter how many games you resign.
  11. SubscriberPaul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    The Stacks
    Joined
    21 Aug '09
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    99821
    23 Nov '14 02:07
    Originally posted by lemondrop
    I think that the tournament entry rating is a much truer indicator of a player's strength, since it has a floor in place, the TER will never drop more than 100 points from your yearly high no matter how many games you resign.
    This is a good point that people tend to overlook.
  12. Joined
    15 Jun '10
    Moves
    30767
    23 Nov '14 02:33
    I have absolutely no need for tactical resignation even if I'd thought of it; I resign enough anyway....
  13. Joined
    08 Apr '09
    Moves
    16436
    24 Nov '14 09:08
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    I'm much more likely to play slowly when I'm in difficulties than when I'm ahead. As tvochess said, it is a lot easier to find good moves when ahead than when behind. Although sometimes I've found myself in positions where I'm objectively ahead but don't really know what to do with a good position. Really it matters whether I can find a plan or if I'm ...[text shortened]... checkmate and I let them play it out, but I'll normally move quickly under those circumstances).
    I don't think I actually said that it is easier to find good moves when ahead.

    I take more time in 'difficult positions'. This will be when I'm worse, because I can't afford extra blunders or need to trick an opponent. Or in a good position, when I don't have a clear plan.
  14. Standard memberDeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    Cosmopolis
    Joined
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    78940
    24 Nov '14 21:351 edit
    Originally posted by tvochess
    I don't think I actually said that it is easier to find good moves when ahead.

    I take more time in 'difficult positions'. This will be when I'm worse, because I can't afford extra blunders or need to trick an opponent. Or in a good position, when I don't have a clear plan.
    No you didn't and I'm left wondering why I thought you did.
  15. Joined
    15 Jun '10
    Moves
    30767
    24 Nov '14 22:19
    Originally posted by tvochess
    No.

    Although the game may end when you think you have a lost game, it is not over when you think you have a won game. There are too many reasons why not to resign, and even playing slower is reasonable. In tough positions, everyone spends more time on thinking. Or gives up, but that is not chess.
    Playing more slowly may be reasonable, but to more or less stop playing altogether is stretching a point rather, and implies a different reason for not making moves. It is also quite reasonable to resign clearly lost positions ( it's still chess...); if people prefer to fight on to the last pawn then fair enough, just don't stop playing, that's my point.
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