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  1. 28 Jun '10 10:18
    There is a plethora of famous games out there, but are there certain moves that were so shocking, so incredible and unexpected that the moves themselves became famous? I'd love to see some, and by all means post the complete game leading up to them.

    Thanks!
  2. 28 Jun '10 11:00
    I like this one from the game Bellon - Garcia, Cienfuegos 1978: 38. .... Rg2!!

    and white resigned.


  3. 28 Jun '10 11:15
    And what about this beautiful clearing move: 50. Nf5!! and black resigned

    played in Karpov - Csom, Lauterberg 1977


  4. 28 Jun '10 11:23
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    I like this one from the game Bellon - Garcia, Cienfuegos 1978: 38. .... Rg2!!

    and white resigned.


    [pgn]
    1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2 e6 7.O-O Qc7 8.f4 Be7 9.Kh1 Nc6 10.Be3 O-O 11.Qe1 Na5 12.Rd1 b5 13.e5 dxe5 14.fxe5 Qxe5 15.Bf4 Qc5 16.Bf3 Bb7 17.b4 Qxb4 18.Bxb7 Rad8 19.Nc6 Nxc6 20.Bxc6 Rc8 21.Bd2 Rxc6 22.Nd5 Nxd5 23.Bxb4 B ...[text shortened]... 31.Kg2 Rc2+ 32.Kh3 g5 33.Ra3 Be7 34.Qd1 Rb2 35.Ra7 f5 36.Rxe7 Nxe7 37.g4 Nd5 38.gxf5 Rg2
    [/pgn]
    Of the two this is my favorite. Never in a million years would I have seen that! Wow. Not that the other one wasn't also amazing.
  5. 28 Jun '10 12:26
    Levitsky-Marshall,1912

    23.... Qg3!! words cannot describe it.



    toet.
  6. 28 Jun '10 13:58
    I'll nominate 34...Re8 as played by Kaissa.

    Duchess - Kaissa. Computer W.C. Toronto, 7th August 1977.

    The day computers came of age.

    Black - Kaissa(in check) to play.



    Black played 34...Re8??

    How they laughed.
    Onlooking masters included Hans Berliner shook their heads.

    They switched off Kaissa and tried to de-bug it.

    They asked Kaissa why it did not play 1...Kg7.

    You will have to imagine the indignity Kaissa felt having to explain
    itself to these human patzers.

    It showed why it played 34...Re8 instead of 24...Kg7.

    (please forgive me but White has to go first on the RHP moving thing).

  7. 28 Jun '10 15:01
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    I'll nominate 34...Re8 as played by Kaissa.

    Duchess - Kaissa. Computer W.C. Toronto, 7th August 1977.

    The day computers came of age.
    Where do you come up with these gems?

    I did a bit of hunting on this, found Berliner's version of it here. (Page 3, first full paragraph) :

    http://dli.iiit.ac.in/ijcai/IJCAI-81-VOL%201/PDF/105.pdf

    (BTW, I haven't figured out who AH is in the article. ) It's interesting that he mentions Botvinnik was there along with Levy and a number of other strong players. He doesn't mention that HE was there, although maybe that was implied in the telling of the story, I'm not sure. @GP, was Berliner really there? If so, I just find it strange that Berliner couldn't directly admit that he missed it himself. Maybe a bit of the Berliner ego at work?

    Oh yeah, the full game in case anyone's interested:

  8. Standard member Thabtos
    I am become Death
    28 Jun '10 15:40
    Robert James Fischer v. Oscar Panno
    1970 Interzonal Tournament

    1. c4


    1-0
  9. 28 Jun '10 15:42
    the Shirov Bh3 move in the endgame takes the cake
  10. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    28 Jun '10 16:19
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    I like this one from the game Bellon - Garcia, Cienfuegos 1978: 38. .... Rg2!!

    and white resigned.


    [pgn]
    1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2 e6 7.O-O Qc7 8.f4 Be7 9.Kh1 Nc6 10.Be3 O-O 11.Qe1 Na5 12.Rd1 b5 13.e5 dxe5 14.fxe5 Qxe5 15.Bf4 Qc5 16.Bf3 Bb7 17.b4 Qxb4 18.Bxb7 Rad8 19.Nc6 Nxc6 20.Bxc6 Rc8 21.Bd2 Rxc6 22.Nd5 Nxd5 23.Bxb4 B ...[text shortened]... 31.Kg2 Rc2+ 32.Kh3 g5 33.Ra3 Be7 34.Qd1 Rb2 35.Ra7 f5 36.Rxe7 Nxe7 37.g4 Nd5 38.gxf5 Rg2
    [/pgn]
    Same idea, but doesn't 35. ... g4+! win immediately? 35. ... g4+ 36. Kxg4 (forced) Ne3+ 37. Kf3 Nxd1 38. Rxe7 Rxh2 with the capture of the a-pawn soon after. I realize this leaves both sides with an extra rook over the game continuation, but I don't think white can generate much counterplay regardless.
  11. 28 Jun '10 16:28 / 1 edit
    Hi Mad Rook.

    I recall the fuss the game created when it hit the chess world in 1977/78.

    No internet then, it sometimes took months to get hold of games
    played in tournaments, if at all.

    Use to depend on Russian mags for all the games.

    Right - Hans Berliner.

    Page 8. The Chess Computer Book by T.D.Harding. Pergamon, 1982.

    "..astonished onllookers (who included former world correspondence champion
    Hans Berliner) and other masters...."

    The () are Harding's. Strange he never mentioned Botvinink being there.
    A former OTB world champion would have added some more clout to the tale.

    However in the preceeding paragraph he mentions Botvinik's strong interest
    in chess computers. So perhaps he was there.

    T.D.Harding? I wonder if the 'T' stands for Tony, so his real name
    may be Anthony. He might be the AH.

    I Googled T.D.Harding + chess. Top hit took me to that clown Chandler's Corner.

    http://www.chessedinburgh.co.uk/chandlerarticle.php?ChandID=214

    He was gabbing on about the day he met T.D.Harding.

    He also has a pic of a Russian chess mag showing a game with an idea in
    it that he used 26 years later.

    I can better Thabos 1.c4

    1. 0-1

    Game 2 Fishcher - Spassky 1972.
  12. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    28 Jun '10 16:51
    Originally posted by Maxacre42
    the Shirov Bh3 move in the endgame takes the cake
    Agreed! Quite a stunning move. Here's an excerpt from John Watson's review of Shirov's book "Fire On Board II" where he comments briefly on it:

    He (Shirov) says:

    “The idea of giving up the bishop in order to gain the necessary tempo seems very logical and easy to find when it has already been played, but no computer program proved competent enough to suggest it. I would like to think that no human in chess history would be able to find it under the same conditions, but who knows...? Maybe the Swedish grand master, Ulf Andersson, would be able to rise to the challenge....”

    He goes on to explain that Andersson had played a similar move against Shirov seven years before (well, similar in a limited sense of having a related idea), which may have planted a seed, although he doesn't claim to know. He says: “In chess, as in any other field, you need to reach beyond your knowledge (the greater the knowledge, the further you can go!). And that's when creativity begins.”


    Here's the Andersson-Shirov game from 1991 that helped spark Shirov's imagination 7 years later in Linares (note 44. ... Bxh4! and the subsequent king walk over to the queenside):

  13. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    28 Jun '10 16:57
    Surely 17. ... Be6! from Byrne-Fisher 1956 must be on the list as well. A 13-year old Fisher sacrifices his queen for a strong attack with the minor pieces with white's king trapped in the middle of the board. Not even the Spanish Inquisition would have expected that!

  14. Standard member JonathanB of London
    Curb Your Enthusiasm
    28 Jun '10 17:17
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    There is a plethora of famous games out there, but are there certain moves that were so shocking, so incredible and unexpected that the moves themselves became famous? I'd love to see some, and by all means post the complete game leading up to them.

    Thanks!
    Bxh2: Fischer - Spassky, game 1 1972
  15. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    28 Jun '10 17:46 / 1 edit
    Larsen-Spassky, Belgrade 1970

    Black's 14th move is brilliant.


    White resigned rather than play 18 BxQ Bxg4+! forcing mate.

    16.Rg1 is similarly crushed: