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  1. Standard member vivify
    rain
    04 Mar '13 05:25
    How are you supposed to take a chess piece? Do you move your piece onto the square of the captured piece, nudge it a bit, and then take it? Or do you lift your piece up, remove the opponent's piece of the square, and the replace it with yours?

    Also, I heard it's improper eitiqutte to look at your opponent, during a game. Does FIDE have any rules concerning this?

    And what are the FIDE regulations, if someone were to clumsily knock over pieces of the board over, by accident?

    Finally, has there ever been an official FIDE game, where someone tipped over their king in surrender?
  2. 04 Mar '13 13:31
    Originally posted by vivify
    How are you supposed to take a chess piece? Do you move your piece onto the square of the captured piece, nudge it a bit, and then take it? Or do you lift your piece up, remove the opponent's piece of the square, and the replace it with yours?

    Also, I heard it's improper eitiqutte to look at your opponent, during a game. Does FIDE have any rules conce ...[text shortened]... has there ever been an official FIDE game, where someone tipped over their king in surrender?
    In general, a good rule for both players to follow (and this doesn't just apply to chess) is "don't be a dick."

    If you follow this rule, chances are you won't break any unspoken rules.
  3. Subscriber thaughbaer
    Duckfinder General
    04 Mar '13 15:25
    Most people have the dexterity to pick up their own piece then pick up the opponents piece and replace it with one hand. Then use the opponents piece to knock down the button on the clock just to rub it in.
  4. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    04 Mar '13 15:36
    Originally posted by vivify
    How are you supposed to take a chess piece? Do you move your piece onto the square of the captured piece, nudge it a bit, and then take it? Or do you lift your piece up, remove the opponent's piece of the square, and the replace it with yours?

    Also, I heard it's improper eitiqutte to look at your opponent, during a game. Does FIDE have any rules conce ...[text shortened]... has there ever been an official FIDE game, where someone tipped over their king in surrender?
    As long as you obey the touch move rules it doesn't really matter. The only thing to be careful of is when castling you have to touch the king first, or pick up both pieces at the same time; if you touch the rook first, your opponent is within their rights to claim you are making a rook move and force you to move the rook without getting your king to safety.
  5. 04 Mar '13 19:35
    One thing I've seen people do which I think is pushing it a bit is to get up during your opponent's move, wander round to the other side of the table, and analyse the board from your opponent's position while staring over their shoulder. I think this is a slight invasion of personal chess-space.

    Perfectly legal, though.
  6. 04 Mar '13 20:49
    A book I read 30 years ago advised you to say "J'adoube" before adusting your own piece's position on a square. Is this still how it is done?
  7. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    04 Mar '13 21:36
    Originally posted by vivify
    How are you supposed to take a chess piece? Do you move your piece onto the square of the captured piece, nudge it a bit, and then take it? Or do you lift your piece up, remove the opponent's piece of the square, and the replace it with yours?

    Also, I heard it's improper eitiqutte to look at your opponent, during a game. Does FIDE have any rules conce ...[text shortened]... has there ever been an official FIDE game, where someone tipped over their king in surrender?
    The first way you mentioned is the way I do it and I always use my right hand only and have not had any complaints yet. My opponent and I have looked at each other from time to time, so I don't think that is a problem either. The score sheets are used to reset the board in case of an accident. I see it happen from time to time in USCF rated games.
  8. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    04 Mar '13 21:37
    Originally posted by Paul Dirac II
    A book I read 30 years ago advised you to say "J'adoube" before adusting your own piece's position on a square. Is this still how it is done?
    I don't like to try to speak French, so I just say, "I adjust."
  9. 04 Mar '13 22:53 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by aquatabby
    One thing I've seen people do which I think is pushing it a bit is to get up during your opponent's move, wander round to the other side of the table, and analyse the board from your opponent's position while staring over their shoulder. I think this is a slight invasion of personal chess-space.

    Perfectly legal, though.
    I had this playing a strong kid in a congress a few years back.

    Every time the little heller moved he got up and would stand right over my shoulder and look at the position - nearly every move!

    His Daddy watched every game in the corner, and had spent lots of money on his coaching. I would'nt take that now.

    ...he beat me

    He is now a very strong player and i would expect to make IM
  10. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    04 Mar '13 23:12
    Originally posted by plopzilla
    I had this playing a strong kid in a congress a few years back.

    Every time the little heller moved he got up and would stand right over my shoulder and look at the position - nearly every move!

    His Daddy watched every game in the corner, and had spent lots of money on his coaching. I would'nt take that now.

    ...he beat me

    He is now a very strong player and i would expect to make IM
    I wouldn't doubt it if he is allowed to keep dong things like that. Complain to the TD.
  11. Subscriber sundown316
    The Mighty Messenger
    09 Mar '13 13:47
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    I wouldn't doubt it if he is allowed to keep dong things like that. Complain to the TD.
    I agree. Technically,that is "annoying or distracting" the opponent.
  12. 09 Mar '13 14:32 / 1 edit
    Standing behind an opponent.
    Some books advise you you do this now and then to get a different perspective.
    There are some pics of Petrosian using this technique but not on every move.
    It's not against the rules but if the lad is breathing in your earhole and putting
    you off you can see the TD.

    Some may do it because it's part of a good luck routine. (chess player are a superstitious lot.
    Favourite pen, seat, tie, hat. Patting both Rooks before a game was trade mark of Tartakower.)

    When I won the Scottish Open in '83 at Troon in Ayrshire in my first game
    when I castled I wrote TR00N on my scoreshet for a laugh. I won a good game.
    For the rest of tournament (P7.W6 L1 D0) I was writing TR00N or TR000N.

    After that and ever since then I write Z00M or Z000M on a my scoresheet when I castle.

    Taking a piece.
    First time I beat a really strong player OTB, an IM elect, all I had to do was take a Bishop. "It wins."
    I suddenly froze, I coud not bring myself to do it.
    It last all of about 10 seconds but it seemed like a lifeitme. I never forgot that
    and I know other player have felt the same when taking their first scalp.
    It's quite hurdle ot overcome.

    There is lot more going on between two players than just a simple game.

    A very good friend of mine was playing a strong player in the Scottish Championship.
    He was a piece up with 7 minutes on his clock to make 5 moves.
    His opponent was a piece down with two minutes to make 5 moves.
    My friend froze up, he could not make another move and lost on time. It happens.
  13. 09 Mar '13 17:49
    The game would hardly be worth playing if you weren't allowed to look at each other. Are there any rules on talking (i.e. is it allowed), or conversational etiquette? I've hardly played OTB since primary school (aged 7-10), where I used to talk and even sing a bit during games if I felt comfortable. The lad who was top of the chess ladder liked my singing/humming, and I think it took the edge off his defeats to me. Useful since he was much older and bigger than me! I would find it deeply uncomfortable to be prevented formally from conversing with someone during a game, whether about chess or other things, even so far as to not want to play at all.
  14. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    10 Mar '13 01:00
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Standing behind an opponent.
    Some books advise you you do this now and then to get a different perspective.
    There are some pics of Petrosian using this technique but not on every move.
    It's not against the rules but if the lad is breathing in your earhole and putting
    you off you can see the TD.

    Some may do it because it's part of a good luck rout ...[text shortened]... 5 moves.
    My friend froze up, he could not make another move and lost on time. It happens.
    Do you now admit that psychology can play a role in the outcome of a game?
  15. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    10 Mar '13 01:14
    Originally posted by NoEarthlyReason
    The game would hardly be worth playing if you weren't allowed to look at each other. Are there any rules on talking (i.e. is it allowed), or conversational etiquette? I've hardly played OTB since primary school (aged 7-10), where I used to talk and even sing a bit during games if I felt comfortable. The lad who was top of the chess ladder liked my si ...[text shortened]... during a game, whether about chess or other things, even so far as to not want to play at all.
    Some chess players do not like noises or conversations going on while they are concentrating on a game of chess. I had completed a game and was outside the room with the door closed and talking to another player during the club tournament and another player, who eventually won the tournament, came out enraged at the fact that we were out in the hall talking. So different people take it differently. I think Bobby Fischer also got very upset with any distractions.