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  1. Standard member Wibble Wobble
    Action barbie
    05 Jan '06 17:01
    I just got this book yesterday (Amazon were slow ) and was wondering if people that read this book either:

    (use the bit on opposition at the start for an example)

    1) Try do it in your head
    2) Try do it in your head but if you cant visualise it all to t he end, skip the section
    3) Use winboard
    4) Use a real board



    The book looks good so far and very little variations and 'moves' in it. Highly recommend it
  2. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    05 Jan '06 17:23
    Originally posted by Wibble Wobble
    I just got this book yesterday (Amazon were slow ) and was wondering if people that read this book either:

    (use the bit on opposition at the start for an example)

    1) Try do it in your head
    2) Try do it in your head but if you cant visualise it all to t he end, skip the section
    3) Use winboard
    4) Use a real board



    The book looks good so far and very little variations and 'moves' in it. Highly recommend it
    I usually read a book all the way through once or twice, working some of the analysis in my head, and skipping some--depending on the complexity and detail of the analysis, and the number of distractions in the room. Only then do I sit down with the book and a chessboard and play through the games and some of the analysis. When playing through a game, I try to do the analysis in my head before playing it out.

    I use Silman's king vs. king opposition and outflanking exercise as part of my chess instruction. It is a skill the kids must master to earn their Bishop Award.
  3. Standard member Wibble Wobble
    Action barbie
    05 Jan '06 17:30
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    I usually read a book all the way through once or twice, working some of the analysis in my head, and skipping some--depending on the complexity and detail of the analysis, and the number of distractions in the room. Only then do I sit down with the book and a chessboard and play through the games and some of the analysis. When playing through a game, I try ...[text shortened]... as part of my chess instruction. It is a skill the kids must master to earn their Bishop Award.
    Thanks I think I will try that.


    The knights section in the book is exellent, and thats not even 1/4 through the book!! So was the bishop section

    All the games are instructive and he explains. Doesnt give thousands of variations!
  4. 05 Jan '06 17:54
    I'm just amazed that Amazon was slow. Are you sure it wasn't one of the many affiliate subcontracts? When I order from Amazon proper, it only takes 2-3 days to reach my address.
  5. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    05 Jan '06 20:46
    Originally posted by Wibble Wobble
    Thanks I think I will try that.


    The knights section in the book is exellent, and thats not even 1/4 through the book!! So was the bishop section

    All the games are instructive and he [b]explains
    . Doesnt give thousands of variations![/b]
    Its one of my fav's. Check out also Best lessons of a chess coach
    by Remantrey, I am spelling it wrong but google the title.
  6. Standard member Frank Burns
    Great Big Stees
    05 Jan '06 21:05
    Originally posted by Wibble Wobble
    I just got this book yesterday (Amazon were slow ) and was wondering if people that read this book either:

    (use the bit on opposition at the start for an example)

    1) Try do it in your head
    2) Try do it in your head but if you cant visualise it all to t he end, skip the section
    3) Use winboard
    4) Use a real board



    The book looks good so far and very little variations and 'moves' in it. Highly recommend it
    I've had it for a while (a year or so) and I do like it.

    Originally I wrote in the book with pencil or tried to do it in my head. Now that I have a couple of boards I find it more helpful as well as more fun to play it out on the boards.

    Enjoy you book and good luck in your games.
  7. Standard member Frank Burns
    Great Big Stees
    05 Jan '06 21:07 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Wulebgr

    I use Silman's king vs. king opposition and outflanking exercise as part of my chess instruction. It is a skill the kids must master to earn their Bishop Award.[/b]
    That's interesting as I was just thinking of doing that same thing last night. I think I'll press on with the drills.
  8. 05 Jan '06 21:57
    I read every book with a board infront of me and make the moves. I go through all the variations and don't skip anything. If the variations are just a couple of moves then I do them in my head.

    I just read books once though because I borrow them and then return them. The only book I read twice was Logical Chess: Move by Move because it was so good.
  9. 06 Jan '06 04:40
    I read everybook without a board, that makes it more challenging. But book reading is good for chess. Especially Silman's books. They teach you some solid chess. But when I play Sicilian I don't use databases. I like to use databeses when I play Clementz's opening. Bishops are better than knights in open positions and knights can jump over pieces. They are also good blockaders as Nimzovich put it: Pawns wants to be promoted. So; in endings with passed pawns being on the opposite sides, bishops usually beat knights. Don't forget to put your passed pawns behind your rook too.I like to play Ruy lopez open variation with black for a solid position, and I like to play Ruy Lopez with white because i can manouver my knight from b1 to f1. I always try to put my light squared bishop on c2 and queen on d1.
  10. Standard member Chaswray
    NUTTING BUSTER
    06 Jan '06 11:45
    http://www.uni-klu.ac.at/~gossimit/c/chess.htm

    At this link you can download game collections from selected books. Load them into Chessbase or Chessbase Light and follow along in the book without the hassle of setting up the pieces on a real board. Silman's "Reassess Your Chess" is included as well as"The Amateur's Mind". "My System" and "The Art of Attack" are also there.

    Best part of all though?....it's free