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  1. 16 Jul '09 19:38 / 2 edits
    Often I see people, grandmasters down to novices, fianchetto their bishop at g2 and have a pawn at e4 or fianchetto at b2 and have a pawn at d4. Their are times when this is seemingly done pre-planned, i.e. not forced. This sort of position seems to me as though it defies a central idea of fianchettoing your bishop which is controlling the long diagonal. What is the purpose of a fianchetto with pawns in the center?
  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Gonzalo de Córdoba
    16 Jul '09 19:49
    Originally posted by amolv06
    Often I see people, grandmasters down to novices, fianchetto their bishop at g2 and have a pawn at e4 or fianchetto at b2 and have a pawn at d4. Their are times when this is seemingly done pre-planned, i.e. not forced. This sort of position seems to me as though it defies a central idea of fianchettoing your bishop which is controlling the long diagonal. What is the purpose of a fianchetto with pawns in the center?
    The fianchetto protects the Pawn and the arrangement allows for a discovered attack on the long diagonal.
  3. 16 Jul '09 20:22
    Originally posted by amolv06
    What is the purpose of a fianchetto with pawns in the center?
    Sometimes when something doesn't look so good statically - i.e. from the immediate fixed point of view - then you may want to consider it dynamically - i.e. what if the pawns were to move, etc.

    For bishop on g2, pawn on e4, even if White's pawn is fixed it may still be serving a role by deterring Black from playing e.g. f5. Similarly, if White could get an outpost to d5/f5, exchanging this may lead to improving the scope of the fianchetto bishop, therefore helping support the outpost.

    Sometimes a latent feature of the position limits the opponent's options if they need to avoid making the feature more active, hence it still impacts the game. Compare moves where a rook is not played to an open file but instead is played to a file where either side may try to open it in the near future. Again, dynamic possibilities rather than immediate static considerations.
  4. Standard member atticus2
    Frustrate the Bad
    16 Jul '09 23:18
    This (Varenka's post) is generally correct - dynamic/long-term trumps static/short-term - but not entirely. Experience tells us that g2 with e4, and g7/e5, work well enough: the King's Indian Attack/Defence (KIA/KID) are good examples. But b2/d4 is less frequently observed than b7/d5, possibly because the QID is quite popular for Black.

    These various set-ups need study though; they do break the 'rule' that the fianchettoed bishop should not usually be impeded by one's own pawn - for obvious reasons
  5. Standard member Nowakowski
    10. O-O
    17 Jul '09 03:18
    Originally posted by Varenka
    Sometimes when something doesn't look so good statically - i.e. from the immediate fixed point of view - then you may want to consider it dynamically - i.e. what if the pawns were to move, etc.

    For bishop on g2, pawn on e4, even if White's pawn is fixed it may still be serving a role by deterring Black from playing e.g. f5. Similarly, if White could get ...[text shortened]... n the near future. Again, dynamic possibilities rather than immediate static considerations.
    rec'd.

    Information which is useful to all players, and insightful! A very good way
    of describing the ideas.


    Good post.


    -GIN
  6. 17 Jul '09 15:42 / 1 edit
    Thanks for the answers! Very helpful. My opponents (and GMs) moves of this sort make some sense now in light of your posts.
  7. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    17 Jul '09 17:04
    Originally posted by amolv06
    Often I see people, grandmasters down to novices, fianchetto their bishop at g2 and have a pawn at e4 or fianchetto at b2 and have a pawn at d4. Their are times when this is seemingly done pre-planned, i.e. not forced. This sort of position seems to me as though it defies a central idea of fianchettoing your bishop which is controlling the long diagonal. What is the purpose of a fianchetto with pawns in the center?
    often it's only a problem if there are no breaks and the pawn gets stuck there. to break through, you generally need to somehow fix a pawn first, or it'll just advance and lock the door for good. one rock isn't enough to crack a nut if you have only soft things to put it against. you need a rock AND a hard place to crack anything hard like a defensive pawn structure.