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  1. 15 Oct '07 18:50
    It seems to me that I am stuck having an average of 1400 plus. I purchased over 10 books including the Bobby Fischer. I started reading them but never actually completed the entire thing. The problem that I am having is no matter how hard I try, I can never think of multiple moves ahead unless when I am under pressure. Can someone give me advice as to how I can train myself to think ahead. What type of questions should I be asking myself? I've been told to never choose the first move that comes to mind but I cannot help it. Thanks in advance.
  2. 15 Oct '07 18:57
    Originally posted by SilentSpic
    It seems to me that I am stuck having an average of 1400 plus. I purchased over 10 books including the Bobby Fischer. I started reading them but never actually completed the entire thing. The problem that I am having is no matter how hard I try, I can never think of multiple moves ahead unless when I am under pressure. Can someone give me advice as to ...[text shortened]... old to never choose the first move that comes to mind but I cannot help it. Thanks in advance.
    Often I lose a game because of a disastrous blunder. Now I try to remember to make a blunder check before every move. I think this will gain over 50 pts, perhaps even 100 pts.

    Another thing is to decide where to put the pieces. Move the knights in the center with support from one or two pawns. Aim for a rook controlled line. And such rule of thumbs can bring you up 50 more pts, even 100 pts.

    Don't read books if you don't think of the examples. I don't think that a book in a fortnight can give you any new insights worth anything when you actually play. You hae to give each book much, and I mean much, time and thought in order to learn something.

    Just a few thoughts...
  3. 15 Oct '07 18:57
    Kmac once told me to sit on my hands while I think about my move.

    It helped for a while, once I approached 1500 though I realized I needed to learn more about the game, sitting on my hands wasn't enough.
  4. 15 Oct '07 18:57
    Originally posted by SilentSpic
    It seems to me that I am stuck having an average of 1400 plus. I purchased over 10 books including the Bobby Fischer. I started reading them but never actually completed the entire thing. The problem that I am having is no matter how hard I try, I can never think of multiple moves ahead unless when I am under pressure. Can someone give me advice as to ...[text shortened]... old to never choose the first move that comes to mind but I cannot help it. Thanks in advance.
    um...try remembering its just a game? It looks like you are trying too hard, just relax and train slowly...too much chess can cause you to burn-out...your thinking process needs to change and forcing it never works...
  5. 15 Oct '07 19:13 / 1 edit
    Blunders really depresses me. I just lost three games in the row because of stupid blunders. The funny thing is that I saw a couple of them but it was too late since I hit submit. I'm gonna try sitting on my hands thing. I'm willing to try anything at this point. I have been playing a lot of games over the last couple of weeks. So, when I am done with the current three, I'm gonna take a little break.

    I do need to start taking out my rooks faster. I usually don't used them until the very end.

    Thanks everyone. Any more Advice will be very helpful.
  6. 15 Oct '07 19:35
    Originally posted by SilentSpic
    It seems to me that I am stuck having an average of 1400 plus. I purchased over 10 books including the Bobby Fischer. I started reading them but never actually completed the entire thing. The problem that I am having is no matter how hard I try, I can never think of multiple moves ahead unless when I am under pressure. Can someone give me advice as to ...[text shortened]... old to never choose the first move that comes to mind but I cannot help it. Thanks in advance.
    I'm not sure you can necessarily assume you're in a rut with only 62 games played. That said, having only read less than one tactics book, my guess is that you need to practice lots more tactics. (Either from books, PC tactics software, or online tactics servers.) And I wouldn't worry yet about not being able to see multiple moves deep at this point.

    I'd recommend that you read as much of Dan Heisman's free advice as you can stand. (I know, I sound like a broken record recommending Dan's web site, but it's probably the best free advice out there.) One thing to remember - The RHP ratings don't necessarily correlate to USCF ratings. At least at the levels you and I are at, I think the RHP ratings are generally inflated compared to USCF ratings.

    Make sure you read his July 2001 Novice Nook article (Chess Books and Prerequisites) and his August 2002 NN article (An Improvement Plan). Then skim the list of Novice Nook articles and read any of them that catch your interest. After doing that, you should have a better idea of how to proceed.

    http://www.chesscafe.com/text/heisman06.pdf

    http://www.chesscafe.com/text/heisman19.pdf

    Here's Dan's Novice Nook page:
    http://mywebpages.comcast.net/danheisman/Articles/Novice_Nook_Links.htm

    Dan's Home chess page:
    http://mywebpages.comcast.net/danheisman/Main_Chess/chess.htm
  7. 15 Oct '07 20:46
    Originally posted by SilentSpic
    It seems to me that I am stuck having an average of 1400 plus. I purchased over 10 books including the Bobby Fischer. I started reading them but never actually completed the entire thing. The problem that I am having is no matter how hard I try, I can never think of multiple moves ahead unless when I am under pressure. Can someone give me advice as to ...[text shortened]... old to never choose the first move that comes to mind but I cannot help it. Thanks in advance.
    You assume that your ability to calculate is what is limiting you. It is a myth that top players achieve their status because they can think 10 moves ahead in every given position. When it is required, the ability to 'compute' every combination is useful, sometimes critical, but far more important is knowing what to think and how.
    Why do you think top GMs still beat most computers, despite being dwarfed by their calculative ability? Because they dont see the game as a mathematical challenge - they see it in terms of strengths, weaknesses, tactics and strategy.

    So to get better, learn some tactics, and a bit of opening and endgame theory. Better players more often 'feel' the right moves, and back it up by checking some of the lines that might develop. They base this on a better understanding of the principles of chess.
    These are fun to learn, but it takes time and a relaxed but consistent approach.

    Oh - and there is a famous quote that says "when you see a good move, stop. Look for a better one"
    This doesn't mean you should never go with your instinctive first move! It is often spot on.
  8. 17 Oct '07 14:10
    Originally posted by SilentSpic
    It seems to me that I am stuck having an average of 1400 plus. I purchased over 10 books including the Bobby Fischer. I started reading them but never actually completed the entire thing. The problem that I am having is no matter how hard I try, I can never think of multiple moves ahead unless when I am under pressure. Can someone give me advice as to ...[text shortened]... old to never choose the first move that comes to mind but I cannot help it. Thanks in advance.
    See this advice from Steve Lopez of Chessbase:

    http://chessbaseusa.sectorlink.org/TNote.aspx?TNoteUrl=tn/Issues_Current/2003_0330.htm
  9. 17 Oct '07 18:21
    Originally posted by magnublm
    See this advice from Steve Lopez of Chessbase:

    http://chessbaseusa.sectorlink.org/TNote.aspx?TNoteUrl=tn/Issues_Current/2003_0330.htm
    Excellent article. Thank you.
  10. 17 Oct '07 20:01
    Originally posted by SilentSpic
    It seems to me that I am stuck having an average of 1400 plus. I purchased over 10 books including the Bobby Fischer. I started reading them but never actually completed the entire thing. The problem that I am having is no matter how hard I try, I can never think of multiple moves ahead unless when I am under pressure. Can someone give me advice as to ...[text shortened]... old to never choose the first move that comes to mind but I cannot help it. Thanks in advance.
    play about ten games of blitz (10 minutes or less) each day...
    while many say that too much blitz is bad for your play, I find that it helps me assess positions faster...
    with me, this gets the ole noodle running at a faster pace and I can usually produce better moves and think a bit farther ahead.
    Analyze your blitz games as well, even the ones you lose horrendously to.
    As you analyze, think to yourself: ok, what was I thinking when I made that move, and make a mental adjustment, and what position SHOULD i have been aiming for.

    now to wait for someone to tell me that this theory is flawed completely.
  11. 17 Oct '07 21:12 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by rubberjaw30
    play about ten games of blitz (10 minutes or less) each day...
    while many say that too much blitz is bad for your play, I find that it helps me assess positions faster...
    with me, this gets the ole noodle running at a faster pace and I can usually produce better moves and think a bit farther ahead.
    Analyze your blitz games as well, even the ones you l ...[text shortened]... ve been aiming for.

    now to wait for someone to tell me that this theory is flawed completely.
    I believe doing the same thing, except with longer games would be more helpful.
  12. 17 Oct '07 21:14 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by Policestate
    You assume that your ability to calculate is what is limiting you. It is a myth that top players achieve their status because they can think 10 moves ahead in every given position. When it is required, the ability to 'compute' every combination is useful, sometimes critical, but far more important is knowing what to think and how.
    Why do you think top G s doesn't mean you should never go with your instinctive first move! It is often spot on.
    I disagree with this. being able to analyse accurate and long enough variations is the first step to everything. that ability is like your eyes and body while you're walking in the forest.

    for that, I'd recommend studying tactics. by the way, nowadays top GMs do not beat computers. actually, the best engine right now is almost ready to give pawn odds to any grandmaster and aim for winning the match. it already has won two matches with moderate GMs. please stop this argument about computers "lacking the soul of chess" or "playing too materialisticly" etc. those days have passed long ago.
  13. 17 Oct '07 21:49 / 1 edit
    instead of trying to prove your moves right, try to disprove/refute them. many top players think like this apparently.

    Also analyse your games with a computer and ask yourself what you were thinking at the time of a bad move or missed good move.
  14. Standard member Ragnorak
    For RHP addons...
    17 Oct '07 22:08
    Originally posted by SilentSpic
    It seems to me that I am stuck having an average of 1400 plus. I purchased over 10 books including the Bobby Fischer. I started reading them but never actually completed the entire thing. The problem that I am having is no matter how hard I try, I can never think of multiple moves ahead unless when I am under pressure. Can someone give me advice as to ...[text shortened]... old to never choose the first move that comes to mind but I cannot help it. Thanks in advance.
    You must be reading the wrong books.

    Seirawan's winning Chess series should suit your skill level perfectly. I'd especially recommend Winning Chess Tactics and Winning Chess Strategy.

    A great free online resource is http://chesstactics.org/

    Once you have read about the different tactical possibilities, you need to do puzzles and lots of them. Chess is a lot about pattern recognition. If you see a certain tactical pattern enough, then you will be able to spot it in your games much easier.

    http://chess.emrald.net/ is great for practicing your tactics. Initially, don't worry about the rating or the clock, just try to keep your percentage correct high. Then you will find that you get quicker and quicker while maintaining your accuracy. That is how I approached it, but of course you have to find a system which suits you.

    If you have money, then I couldn't recommend Chess Mentor 3 highly enough. It's absolutely superb piece of software for nearly all levels.
    http://www.chessmentor.com/lessons.html

    D
  15. Standard member Kepler
    Demon Duck
    17 Oct '07 23:00
    Originally posted by diskamyl
    I disagree with this. being able to analyse accurate and long enough variations is the first step to everything. that ability is like your eyes and body while you're walking in the forest.

    for that, I'd recommend studying tactics. by the way, nowadays top GMs do not beat computers. actually, the best engine right now is almost ready to give pawn odds to ...[text shortened]... the soul of chess" or "playing too materialisticly" etc. those days have passed long ago.
    The engine you are talking about here runs on fancy hardware and has been tuned especially for the job. Yes, it will consistently thrash grandmasters, but the average engine running on average off the shelf hardware will get soundly walloped by any grandmaster worthy of the title. Calculating power is the essence of engine performance (what do you imagine makes four quad core processors better than one single core?) and that will remain true as long as engines are programmed to play rather than learn to play.