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  1. 16 Jul '06 02:48
    Has anyone seen the August issue of Scientific American? It has a very interesting article about how one becomes an "expert" in a given field, and the article uses Chess as its main example. It talks a bit about the psychology of the master, how the thinking process of the master differs from that of the amateur, and how one should train to be a master. It's quite an interesting read. I reccomend checking it out.

    P.S. I sincerely appologize if I put this in the wrong section, however I feel that this was the best place to put it, as most of the article does deal with chess.
  2. Standard member XanthosNZ
    Cancerous Bus Crash
    16 Jul '06 03:30
    I have never heard of Scientific American.
  3. 16 Jul '06 03:33
    would you like to explain some of the article? i can't find it on the net guess i'll have to subscribe to get it.
  4. 16 Jul '06 03:48
    Originally posted by XanthosNZ
    I have never heard of Scientific American.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_American

    Sounds like an interesting article.
  5. 16 Jul '06 04:28
    i'm not finding it on that site if your trying to show me that article.
  6. Standard member UmbrageOfSnow
    All Bark, No Bite
    16 Jul '06 05:49
    Originally posted by kmac27
    i'm not finding it on that site if your trying to show me that article.
    Just go to a library and they will probably have it.
  7. 16 Jul '06 06:16
    Originally posted by kmac27
    i'm not finding it on that site if your trying to show me that article.
    No, I was replying to Xanthos's comment that he had never heard of Scientific American.
  8. 16 Jul '06 06:17 / 2 edits
    It has to be somewhere online. Maybe it's similar to this one: People, it's not that hard to just search for it online: http://www.sciam.com/print_version.cfm?articleID=0005CCF5-D9D7-1CF6-93F6809EC5880000

    Apparently, the article is called the Expert Mind:

    "A man walks along the inside of a circle of chess tables, glancing at each for two or three seconds before making his move. On the outer rim, dozens of amateurs sit pondering their replies until he completes the circuit. The year is 1909, the man is José Raúl Capablanca of Cuba, and the result is a whitewash: 28 wins in as many games. The exhibition was part of a tour in which Capablanca won 168 games in a row.

    How did he play so well, so quickly? And how far ahead could he calculate under such constraints? "I see only one move ahead," Capablanca is said to have answered, "but it is always the correct one.""

    To get it, you could buy the magazine as a PDF for $5 or get it at a bookstore.
  9. Standard member XanthosNZ
    Cancerous Bus Crash
    16 Jul '06 06:56
    I've always known it as Scientific America. Wonder where I came up with that from.
  10. 16 Jul '06 07:09
    Originally posted by XanthosNZ
    I've always known it as Scientific America. Wonder where I came up with that from.
    The name is Scientific American
    and you can find it at http://www.sciam.com/

    Search locally at SciAm for "chess" and you will find 97 hits.
  11. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    19 Jul '06 19:01
    Originally posted by jgvaccaro
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_American

    Sounds like an interesting article.
    Er, he is pulling your leg completely out of shape.
  12. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    19 Jul '06 19:02
    Originally posted by mjordan2nd
    Has anyone seen the August issue of Scientific American? It has a very interesting article about how one becomes an "expert" in a given field, and the article uses Chess as its main example. It talks a bit about the psychology of the master, how the thinking process of the master differs from that of the amateur, and how one should train to be a master. I ...[text shortened]... r I feel that this was the best place to put it, as most of the article does deal with chess.
    Whats the front cover? I only see the July issue. Dang.
  13. 19 Jul '06 20:58
    I just read it two days ago. It was very interesting. The part about how sports 'prodigies' are disproprtionatly just the oldest/biggest kids in their age category and thus had early success was interesting. Success breeds success as the article says.
  14. 28 Aug '06 17:44
    Originally posted by kmac27
    would you like to explain some of the article? i can't find it on the net guess i'll have to subscribe to get it.
    Just go to a shop that sell magazines - it costs $4.99 for an issue. Front page shows a chess player with 6 boards.
  15. 28 Aug '06 20:32
    I read the whole article but didn't see anything new. Filled with statements like "To accumulate this body of structured knowledge grandmasters typically engage in years of effortful study, continually tackling challenges that lie just beyond their competence. The top performers in music, mathematics and sports appear to gain their expertise in the same way, motivated by competitioin and the joy of victory." I've seen people spend years of "effortful study" and never get beyond 1500. The author, Philip Ross is fairly highly rated in USCF, however, he simply presents a rehash of old studies, especially de Groot (who recently passed away). I'd like to see a new scientific study of chess performance, as clinical as one can get, using a variety of age groups. I believe it would be relevant to many fields, not just chess. I'm sorry, I read the article carefully but wasn't enlightened one bit.