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  1. 29 Dec '06 16:42
    I would like to analyse my games, here and elsewhere, so that I can get a better idea of what works for me and what doesn't. Is there an easy way of doing this, rather than wading manually through hundreds of pgn files?
  2. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    29 Dec '06 16:47
    Originally posted by denzil53
    I would like to analyse my games, here and elsewhere, so that I can get a better idea of what works for me and what doesn't. Is there an easy way of doing this, rather than wading manually through hundreds of pgn files?
    After each game finishes, analyse it in fritz and use the fritz database to store them. Once you get a few hundred games in your base you can create an opening tree to see which openings you are performing well in and which ones need improvement. This way you can channel your study into areas that need improvement. Warning, this is time consuming!
  3. 29 Dec '06 19:29
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    After each game finishes, analyse it in fritz and use the fritz database to store them. Once you get a few hundred games in your base you can create an opening tree to see which openings you are performing well in and which ones need improvement. This way you can channel your study into areas that need improvement. Warning, this is time consuming!
    You speak of fritz. Is there a version that is free? If so could you post a link for this?
  4. 29 Dec '06 19:32
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    After each game finishes, analyse it in fritz and use the fritz database to store them. Once you get a few hundred games in your base you can create an opening tree to see which openings you are performing well in and which ones need improvement. This way you can channel your study into areas that need improvement. Warning, this is time consuming!
    Unfortunately, I think Fritz is a PC only program, and I use a Mac.
  5. Standard member Kepler
    Demon Duck
    29 Dec '06 20:22
    Originally posted by denzil53
    Unfortunately, I think Fritz is a PC only program, and I use a Mac.
    Sigma Chess will do the same job on a Mac. At least it did a few years ago when I had a Mac!
  6. 29 Dec '06 20:47
    If I play a good game over at playchess I usually go back and analyse it with fritz. However I think thats a rather easy option and tbh I don't think I've really gained much from it, well apart from the enjoyment when fritz gives one of your moves ! or even better !!

    So I'm planning to start analyzing my own games, mainly due to a point Jacob Aagaard made about people putting too much attention on what fritz says. Fritz plays like a computer so it's not always that realistic. Yes probs plays the best moves all the time, but maybe not the moves the average chess player would make.

    I think it's good to start with a computer app just to get you into the mindset of trying out different moves but to really improve I think you need to start doing it yourself.

    I'm sure you've played some games and thought 'I should of won that' maybe try and analyse the game yourself see what you get then compare your findings to that of fritz or other computer app.
  7. 29 Dec '06 21:10
    I appologize if this is the wrong place to answer this question, and I don't mean to change the subject, but since we're on the topic of self-analysis, could anyone tell me how to go about doing so. Most of the times that I look at my games, unless I ended up making a blunder or something, I usually end up agreeing with the move I made during the game. Obviously, when I lose these moves were not the right choices, but I can't really see any other good moves sometimes. Are there any strategies that help you find better moves?
  8. Standard member Dies Irae
    I Love U
    29 Dec '06 21:17
    Originally posted by amolv06
    I appologize if this is the wrong place to answer this question, and I don't mean to change the subject, but since we're on the topic of self-analysis, could anyone tell me how to go about doing so. Most of the times that I look at my games, unless I ended up making a blunder or something, I usually end up agreeing with the move I made during the game. Obvio ...[text shortened]... see any other good moves sometimes. Are there any strategies that help you find better moves?
    I'm new to really looking at chess too, and what you need to do is to study the game more in depth and learn the strategies behind chess. This means reading up on the subject. Just because your moves look tactically sound for 5 moves ahead doesn't mean they were the best move. Once you have a base of knowledge to look at your games, you will understand how to analyze them better. You will be able to look at your moves and ask questions like "Was my pawn structure conducive to trading that bishop for that knight" or "I had the initiative here, was playing a defensive move necessary?"
  9. 22 May '07 20:46 / 1 edit
    The guy who started the thread was banned for cheating! How did he get to that high rating if he cannot analyse for himself?
  10. 22 May '07 21:05
    Originally posted by z00t
    The guy who started the thread was banned for cheating! How did he get to that high rating if he cannot analyse for himself?
    ummm... because he was cheating? lol
  11. Standard member Kepler
    Demon Duck
    22 May '07 21:49
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    He could have been using HIARCS which I think will run on a Mac.