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  1. 07 Jan '10 08:47 / 1 edit
    I decided to play Bcd7 to avoid my knight being captured forcing doubled pawns. I later checked online and found this blurb that sort of implies that Nc6 is the most accurate response.

    http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Chess_Opening_Theory/1._e4/1...c5/2._Nf3/2...d6/3._Bb5
    Open Sicilian

    Moves: 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+

    The move Bb5+ is considered an Anti-Sicilian, and is the most commonly seen thereof. White develops his bishop with a tempo, enabling kingside castling, and may seek to develop rapidly along similar lines to the Ruy Lopez in order to meet Blacks later attack head-on, or simply to control d5 by playing c4 but, not wishing to have the kings bishop stuck behind the c4 pawn, exchanging it off first. However, Blacks own development can carry on unhindered and he tends to get an equal game - trying to sabotage the Sicilian this early on may be a cure worse than the disease.

    Black has three replies, assuming no sentient being would block the check with the queen.

    * 3...Nc6 leads to a Lopez-type setup in which Black has already played the useful c5;
    * 3...Nd7
    * 3...Bd7 wins a tempo by compelling the exchange of bishops but gives White more options.


    Would you mind elaborating on the benefits of Nc6 - and why having my C file doubled-up isn't hurting my position? And if you could let me know if my other choices have merit.


  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Gonzalo de Córdoba
    07 Jan '10 09:17 / 1 edit
    Even though your c-Pawns are doubled, the second Pawn is closer to the center than it was. You now have TWO c-Pawns to suppress the d-file with. Your center is very strong, and you have an open file, and you have the Bishop pair.

    E.g. One c-Pawn keeps the White Pawn off d4, and the other supports your own d-Pawn's advance.
  3. 07 Jan '10 09:35
    Yep, I would never play Bxc6 as white but looking at my database it seems playable.

    Black does get a strong centre and at high levels this will be attempted to be exploited and white might even struggle for position

    However at lower levels, i can see Bxc6 as being quite a strong weapon against this. If opening strategies and principles are not learnt, as they probably will not be at lower grades, then it is only possible to exlpoit the strong centre with databases or knowledge of lines.

    So, Bxc6 whilst not on paper a problem for black this would be a tricky opening for a weak black player to pull off.
  4. 07 Jan '10 11:49
    I like the Bd7 line as well - especially in the sicillian where black often has trouble doing anything useful with that light square bishop and you get the opportunity to trade it off at the gain of developing another one of your pieces.

    The way you played that game seemed quite ok to me at a glance, white never really made much of his space advantage and his position eventually became somewhat overstretched, allowing for grabbing of pawns.
  5. 09 Jan '10 15:30
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Even though your c-Pawns are doubled, the second Pawn is closer to the center than it was. You now have TWO c-Pawns to suppress the d-file with. Your center is very strong, and you have an open file, and you have the Bishop pair.

    E.g. One c-Pawn keeps the White Pawn off d4, and the other supports your own d-Pawn's advance.
    On top of that black's white square bishop will become very active. It can be dispatched out by two directions. These two advantages are too good to be ignored for black.
  6. 10 Jan '10 18:58
    Me personally i would never recommend isolating any pawn ...i love doing that to my oppenents find that it mess with there flow of the game.
  7. Subscriber jb70
    State of Confusion
    10 Jan '10 20:17
    There is a game played 2007 between the French Grandmaster Fressinet Laurent(2650) and Van Wely Loek (2680) Grandmaster from the Netherlands.
    Black played 3....Qd7
    Any Ideas?
    White played 4.O-O
    Anyone know the story behind this game?
  8. 10 Jan '10 23:06 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by jb70
    There is a game played 2007 between the French Grandmaster Fressinet Laurent(2650) and Van Wely Loek (2680) Grandmaster from the Netherlands.
    Black played 3....Qd7
    Any Ideas?
    White played 4.O-O
    Anyone know the story behind this game?
    So black tries to sac his queen on move 3,white refuses and instead sacs his bishop??

    That's just crazy.
    Even by Van Wely's standards