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  1. 22 Feb '08 22:35
    1.e4 c5 2.Ne2!

    The classical book line, 2.Nf3 is not as flexible as this. 2.Ne2 can transpose into the book lines if necessary, 2...d6 d4 cxd4 Nxd4

    What is wrong with this variation?
  2. 22 Feb '08 23:26
    Originally posted by ChessJester
    1.e4 c5 2.Ne2!

    The classical book line, 2.Nf3 is not as flexible as this. 2.Ne2 can transpose into the book lines if necessary, 2...d6 d4 cxd4 Nxd4

    What is wrong with this variation?
    It blocks the bishop...its pointless, passive, and doesn't control as many central squares....in other words it accomplishes only some of what Nf3 does and it also causes more problems.
  3. 23 Feb '08 05:35
    Originally posted by ChessJester
    1.e4 c5 2.Ne2!

    The classical book line, 2.Nf3 is not as flexible as this. 2.Ne2 can transpose into the book lines if necessary, 2...d6 d4 cxd4 Nxd4

    What is wrong with this variation?
    It's called the Chameleon variation - because it doesn't allow black to see if white will choose to play the close or open variation. I remember seeing GMs use it in games I'd looked up (I think most were from the 60's and 70's). It's really fine, but it generally just transposes anyway, so it's kind of pointless.
  4. 23 Feb '08 07:33
    Originally posted by cmsMaster
    It's called the Chameleon variation - because it doesn't allow black to see if white will choose to play the close or open variation. I remember seeing GMs use it in games I'd looked up (I think most were from the 60's and 70's). It's really fine, but it generally just transposes anyway, so it's kind of pointless.
    I say that its only fine if it transposes.
  5. 23 Feb '08 20:37
    Originally posted by tomtom232
    I say that its only fine if it transposes.
    It pretty much always does, white basically gets to choose that.
  6. 26 Feb '08 22:00 / 1 edit
    Thank you CMS...

    I am in the middle of a game right now (not on RHP, not rated) that has proved quite interesting. And I mean, it might make you think twice about this variation. I will post it as soon as it is complete.

    Its not a transposition...
  7. 26 Feb '08 22:30 / 1 edit
    1.e4c5
    2.Ne2e5
    3.a4Nc6
    4.Na3d6
    5.c3Nf6
    6.Ng3Be6
    7.Bb5Qd7
    8.d4exd4
    9.cxd4cxd4
    10.Bxc6Qxc6
    11.Qxd4Be7
    12.O-OO-O
    13.Bf4h6
    14.Nf5Bxf5
    15.exf5b6
    16.Rac1Qd7
    17.Nb5Qxf5
    18.Nxd6Bxd6
    19.Qxd6Rad8


    At this point, we both made blunders so I won't go there. The position here seems even and I wonder if white or black could have done any better beyond the first 3 moves. Feel free to pick this apart...
  8. 26 Feb '08 23:45 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by cmsMaster
    It's called the Chameleon variation - because it doesn't allow black to see if white will choose to play the close or open variation. I remember seeing GMs use it in games I'd looked up (I think most were from the 60's and 70's). It's really fine, but it generally just transposes anyway, so it's kind of pointless.
    Not exactly, but you're close. The "Chameleon" variation is 2. Nc3 followed by 3. Ne2.

    2. Ne2 is known as the Keres variation. It is clearly playable (and may transpose into the Chameleon), but seems to allow Black a few more reasonable options which might not be as good against the normal 2. Nf3 e.g. 2...Nf6 (or 2...e6 followed by 3...d5).

    My source for the names of the variations is
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sicilian_Defence#White.27s_second_move_alternatives
  9. 26 Feb '08 23:53
    [Event "Hoogovens-B"]
    [Site "Wijk aan Zee"]
    [Date "1983.01.??"]
    [Round "2"]
    [White "Kuijf,Marinus"]
    [Black "Franco Ocampos,Zenon"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [Eco "B20"]
    1.e4 c5 2.Ne2 Nf6 3.Nbc3 d5 4.exd5 Nxd5 5.Nxd5 Qxd5 6.d4 e5 7.Nc3 Qxd4 8.Be3 Qb4 9.Qd5 Be6 10.Bb5+ Qxb5 11.Qxe6+ fxe6 12.Nxb5 Kd7 13.0-0-0+ Kc6 14.Rd8 Kxb5 15.Rhd1 g6 16.Rc8 Bg7 17.Rxc5+ Ka6 18.b4 b6 19.Rc7 Bf8 20.Rd8 Kb5 21.Rcc8 Nc6 22.Rxa8 Nxd8 23.Rxd8 Kxb4 24.Ra8 Kb5 25.Rxa7 Bc5 26.Kd2 Bxe3+ 27.Kxe3 Rc8 28.Kd3 e4+ 29.Kd2 Rf8 30.Ke3 Rc8 31.Rxh7 Rxc2 32.Rg7 Rxa2 33.Rxg6 Kc5 34.Rxe6 b5 35.Re5+ Kc4 36.Rxe4+ Kc3 37.Re8 b4 38.Rc8+ Kb2 39.h4 Ra3+ 40.Kf4 Rc3 41.Rb8 b3 42.h5 Rc4+ 43.Kg5 Rc2 44.g4 Rxf2 45.h6 1-0
  10. 12 Mar '08 17:02 / 2 edits
    Guys, I am in a game right now on RHP and it is one of the most exciting games I have played in recent memory. Opening was 1.e4 c5 2.Ne2 e5 3.a4? Nf3 4.Ng3 d5 5.d3 d4 6.Na3

    Please don't comment on the game it is still IN PROGRESS... Although unrated.
    Game 4658541

    I will continue playing this opening against anyone who wants to challenge me. After this game is complete I am going to run the moves through a chess comp to see what it comes up with.
    Basically I'm trying a blockade strategy similar to some lines played by black. I don't know of any blockades that give up space for white, but this is one of them I came up with.

    My strategy was a f-pawn break after castling kingside. I know that black loves a queen side attack in the sicilian, so thats why I go for the blockade. It does hamper my movement, and I'm sure that if black played properly from move 6 on that he could probably obtain an advantage. There are quite a few devious traps that transpire if black moves Qa5+ (blocked by Bb2). My outposts are on f5 c4 and b5.

    There is no move history in this game, but I have been recording it manually.
    1.e4 c5 2.Ne2 e5 3.a4 Nf6 4.Ng3 d5 5.d3 d4 6.Na3 Qa5+ 7.Bd2 Qc7 8.Nb5 Qb6 9.Be2 Nc6 10.0-0 Be6 11.f4 0-0-0 12.fxe5 Nxe5 13.Nf5 a6 14.Na3 c4 15.b3 cxb3 14.cxb3 Bxb3 15.Rb1 Qe6 16.Nxd4
  11. 12 Mar '08 17:57
    Originally posted by ChessJester
    1.e4 c5 2.Ne2!

    The classical book line, 2.Nf3 is not as flexible as this. 2.Ne2 can transpose into the book lines if necessary, 2...d6 d4 cxd4 Nxd4

    What is wrong with this variation?
    Capablanca dislike Sicilian Defense because of 2. Ne2 ... too many holes on the black side he said once !