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  1. 03 Jul '09 19:38
    I recently won a game in which the final ten moves were based on a tactical theme from chessimo software and an endgame technique from silman's book. Inspired from this, I attempted to convince friends and loved ones that studying chess was not a complete waste of time- to no avail. Just wondering- does anyone have an example of games like that- but better (glance at my rating)- where a position was won because of hours put in and not innate brilliance.
  2. 03 Jul '09 19:42
    I study chess but my brother does not study chess and i can beat him everytime maybe i can beat my dad soon if i keep studying.
  3. Standard member Ramned
    The Rams
    03 Jul '09 20:05 / 6 edits
    I have won / avoided losses on several games because I dedicated around 30-50 hours of studying Rook v Pawn Endgames. Because I mastered the Lucena Position, I have been able to pull of Lucena victories when they come (which is not rare). I have had a few philodor draws. I have won games where my opponent could have drawn, but did not know how to.

    Perhaps what exemplifies my new-found rook endgame prowess was a game I played on ICC yesterday. Note that I am black. It definitly wasn't the best game I've played; I must have made 2-4 '?' moves...as did he, but the endgame, perhaps not the easiest way to win, was based on the fact that I knew how to win it.





    Although in time pressure I may have made some mistakes, I recognized that if I could cut his king off 1 rank from my final pawn and get my king in front of it, I would have strong chances for a win because it is a position that even masters would have trouble trying OTB. I recognized it through extensive study; otherwise I doubt I would have sacrificed rook for bishop.
  4. 03 Jul '09 20:46
    Ramned I'm glad you posted this because I have never studied endgames but just purchased Silman's Complete Endgame Course and once it's here I will start but it's good to see that you were able to spot that so early and know you had a winning position. I hope the outcome of my studying is the same.
  5. 03 Jul '09 21:21
    I think studying is a great thing for a chess player. I've just finished studying Winning Chess Tactics and beleive me, I think I've been reborn.
  6. 03 Jul '09 21:43
    Originally posted by Ramned
    I have won / avoided losses on several games because I dedicated around 30-50 hours of studying Rook v Pawn Endgames. Because I mastered the Lucena Position, I have been able to pull of Lucena victories when they come (which is not rare). I have had a few philodor draws. I have won games where my opponent could have drawn, but did not know how to.

    Perhaps ...[text shortened]... sive study; otherwise I doubt I would have sacrificed rook for bishop.
    Which books did you use to study rook endings? Which did you find the most useful?
  7. Standard member Ramned
    The Rams
    03 Jul '09 23:21 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by skims
    Which books did you use to study rook endings? Which did you find the most useful?
    I've so far only used Silman's Complete Endgame Course. While it is a pretty nice book, it does not go in very deep for rook endgames. It only shows you 1-2 examples for each lesson (ton of lessons in the book) Then again, I have not yet finished the book. It has NOT been my primary source for endgame study. Do not expect it to suddenly make you a master of endgames, but reading a lesson everyday from it will lend you some tricks you've never known before. Overall very useful 'catalogue'

    The primary source I have used is lessons from FM Daniel Rensch. Through a website (PM me if you want it), he clearly provided a series of 10 videos outlining rook endgames, from beginners (which I was at the time), to master. Watching these videos (about 3-4 hours of material) is the best use of study time I've ever had. I'm going through them a second and third time as these tricky positions that he goes over with are actually common. From his videos I was able to win that game!

    Finally, I used a chess program called Chess Mentor (also through that same site) in order to practice rook vs rook + pawn endgames. This is especially important than just being fed the information - there are SO many tricky positions that you simply MUST practice it on a board somehow.

    Unfortunately, it costs about 90-100$ for such a membership (annual) but I assure you it is money well invested if you are taking chess seriously; as they have tons of videos from GMs, IMs, and FMs like Daniel Rensch covering all sorts of themes in chess. I don't want to advertise that site anymore here though, PM me for more information.
  8. 04 Jul '09 05:43
    well played ending. Just like in life, you need to know where you are going before you go there (or in other words have a goal). Knowing your endgames helps you to know where you want to go, what position you are trying to create. Then it's just a matter of technique on how to create it. Players who don't know will just bounce around trying to calculate while you are playing to a plan. The person who knows where he is going and plays to the plan will normally come out on top. This is how it is in business, chess, and life.
  9. Standard member orion25
    Art is hard
    04 Jul '09 09:50
    Originally posted by passedpawn22
    well played ending. Just like in life, you need to know where you are going before you go there (or in other words have a goal). Knowing your endgames helps you to know where you want to go, what position you are trying to create. Then it's just a matter of technique on how to create it. Players who don't know will just bounce around trying to calc ...[text shortened]... ys to the plan will normally come out on top. This is how it is in business, chess, and life.
    for rook endings you need to do 3 things:

    1-Get an active rook (7th rank is ideal in most cases) - as soon as your opponent rook is tied down to defense you can go to the next fase, which is:
    2-get an active king (or at least a better king) - bring him forward do your opponent doesnt have space to inflitc damage
    2 - have the better pawns - this is the hardests part for it depends on the game you played before, exchange if you need to, but most importantly use the advantage in the field above to create a passed pawn (were the opponent is weak)
  10. 04 Jul '09 10:17
    Too bad you missed 34. ... Qxh3#

    Also, after 64. ... Kb5, 65.Rd1 is enough to draw, although it remains technical.
  11. Standard member Ramned
    The Rams
    04 Jul '09 15:39 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    Too bad you missed 34. ... Qxh3#

    Also, after 64. ... Kb5, 65.Rd1 is enough to draw, although it remains technical.
    Yes I was really ticked off to find I missed a 1-move checkmate. How embarrassing.

    And the draw, while possible, I believed too difficult for him to find in his time pressure. Not a good game for me, a sloppy win.

    Recalling that position, I recalled analyzing it as he would take on move 33 with his rook, because I think I saw that checkmate if he did it with knight. Then I would win his queen. When he played Nxg3 I was suprised and kicked myself because I thought I had blundered when there was a simple checkmate there!!!


    And I just went back to look at that game again, to see how much time I spent on that move where I missed checkmate: 3 seconds. I still had 21 minutes on the clock.

    Maybe I should hit up some more tactics
  12. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    04 Jul '09 15:59 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by searcy1977
    I recently won a game in which the final ten moves were based on a tactical theme from chessimo software and an endgame technique from silman's book. Inspired from this, I attempted to convince friends and loved ones that studying chess was not a complete waste of time- to no avail. Just wondering- does anyone have an example of games like that- but bette ...[text shortened]... ance at my rating)- where a position was won because of hours put in and not innate brilliance.
    all games on club level and above are won because of hours put in and not innate brilliance. books are not the only way to study though.
  13. 04 Jul '09 16:18
    Originally posted by Ramned
    Yes I was really ticked off to find I missed a 1-move checkmate. How embarrassing.

    And the draw, while possible, I believed too difficult for him to find in his time pressure. Not a good game for me, a sloppy win.

    Recalling that position, I recalled analyzing it as he would take on move 33 with his rook, because I think I saw that checkmate if he d ...[text shortened]... : 3 seconds. I still had 21 minutes on the clock.

    Maybe I should hit up some more tactics
    A little tip that has gained me countless points:
    whenever your opponent makes a surprising move spend extra time on the position.
    Especially if you saw a tactic and his unexpected move seems to be something you overlooked.Spend time to see if the tactic doesn't work in another way or if it allows another tactic.
  14. Standard member Ramned
    The Rams
    04 Jul '09 16:41
    Originally posted by Romanticus
    A little tip that has gained me countless points:
    whenever your opponent makes a surprising move [b]spend extra time on the position
    .
    Especially if you saw a tactic and his unexpected move seems to be something you overlooked.Spend time to see if the tactic doesn't work in another way or if it allows another tactic.[/b]
    Yeah that's true and it applies also in openings. Whenever your opponent plays a move in opening that you have never seen before then it is your job to prove that the move is bad.
  15. 04 Jul '09 22:43
    i have a few lines i know to 10 moves + , and sometimes use computers to improve them,

    agree its hard to convince family / friends its interesting ...