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  1. 27 Apr '16 20:47
    A couple of examples from Abraham's book 'The Chess Mind.'

    (One of them is a mate in 50 moves. It's very easy to solve.)

    Which leads onto RHP examples, puzzles and the RHP Hall of doom.


    Blog 311
  2. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    02 May '16 13:47
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    A couple of examples from Abraham's book 'The Chess Mind.'

    (One of them is a mate in 50 moves. It's very easy to solve.)

    Which leads onto RHP examples, puzzles and the RHP Hall of doom.


    Blog 311
    Thanks for the blog, I always enjoy reading them. I gave the mate in 50 position to Crafty to see how well an engine copes. It does produce the correct first move. However, after about 16 hours of computation it misses the point. It works out how to capture black's pawn and capture on f3, but then it just gives f3 blocking its own position at the end of its principle variation. Admittedly its search algorithm twigs the method if one advances the position to the move after Kxf3 - but it can't get it, at least in a sane amount of time, without moving the pieces on the board. It's nice to see a problem I can do (except I saw the text under the board first and that focused my attention on f3) without touching the pieces that a computer couldn't. I'll leave it running and see if it gets the full line in less than a few days.
  3. 03 May '16 01:55 / 1 edit
    Hi Deep Thought.

    White to play and mate in 50.



    Once a human twigs the plan one can visualise how it's done
    without actually counting. and it is on the whole fairly easy.

    A computer's horizon effect probably kicks in here but the stronger models should
    get it and start predicting mate. I've seen lads posting on chess.games saying Rybka
    or Komodo etc is announcing mate in 35 from live games in late middle game positions.

    Considering here it only has to calculate one or two Black moves a super-duper box should get it fairly quickly.
  4. Subscriber jb70
    State of Confusion
    03 May '16 10:34
    This is a composition By W.E.Rudolf 1912 from Kmoch's Pawn Power book.
    White to play and draw.
    The chess engine Rybka evaluates black +6 and would play for white 1) exf6
    I played this against the engine following W.E.Rudolf's solution.

    W.E.Rudolf ..............................Rybka

    1.) Ba4+ .................................. Kxa4 now the engine evaluates black +8
    2.) b3+ .....................................Kb5
    3.) c4+ .....................................Kc6
    4.) d6+......................................Kd7
    5.) e6+......................................Kxd8
    6.) f5
    End of study.Draw ,but the engine now evaluates this Black +13