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  1. 09 May '13 11:09
    The other thread on this matter has been closed.

    Tim Harding brings us right up to date in The Kibitzer on Chess Cafe:

    http://www.chesscafe.com/kibitz/kibitz204.htm

    He has done some sluething and found some facts about the incident.

    He also covers 'experiences' he too has suffered in OTB play.
    This is from Tim's post:

    "The worst case – though not involving cheating of the same kind – that
    ever happened to me occurred back in the 1970s in an Open tournament.

    A rather unpleasant opponent (whom I had recently defeated in another
    competition) brought a beer mug full of water to the board.

    The thought crossed my mind that he perhaps intended to deliberately
    spill this at some strategic moment, but of course there was no proof of
    any such intention, other than the water itself standing by the board,
    and I did not wish to break my concentration or that of the players on
    nearby boards.

    However, a few minutes later this is precisely what happened.

    While it was my turn to move, he got up from the board and accidentally-
    on-purpose spilled the whole pint over the board and my trousers.
    Not surprisingly he won the game (which he certainly was not winning prior
    to this incident) and my chance of a prize in the tournament was spoiled."
  2. 09 May '13 15:21 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    [b]The other thread on this matter has been closed.

    Tim Harding brings us right up to date in The Kibitzer on Chess Cafe:

    http://www.chesscafe.com/kibitz/kibitz204.htm

    He has done some sluething and found some facts about the incident.

    He also covers 'experiences' he too has suffered in OTB play.
    This is from Tim's post:

    "The worst case – ...[text shortened]... ning prior
    to this incident) and my chance of a prize in the tournament was spoiled."
    [/b]
    Imagine someone deliberately spilling a pint of water on you in Glasgow, they'd be wearing the pint glass hame and picking pawns from their nose probably. What dastardly deeds these cads get up to. Have you had any dastardly deeds tried on you GP?
  3. 09 May '13 19:02
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    [b]The other thread on this matter has been closed.

    Tim Harding brings us right up to date in The Kibitzer on Chess Cafe:

    http://www.chesscafe.com/kibitz/kibitz204.htm

    He has done some sluething and found some facts about the incident.

    He also covers 'experiences' he too has suffered in OTB play.
    This is from Tim's post:

    "The worst case – ...[text shortened]... ning prior
    to this incident) and my chance of a prize in the tournament was spoiled."
    [/b]
    Ah ha ha ha. OMG! You're painting us all very bad.

    Honestly we're not all bad. Have a look at my rating.

    Cork is more famous for food and wine than it is for chess, lol.

    Poor Greenpawn will never visit us again. Lol
  4. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    09 May '13 21:08
    I played an old boy otb once who tutted at every move I made.
    I won and he rather ungraciously told me that I was not playing proper chess!
    (I opened f4 and left theory after that ...)
  5. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    10 May '13 10:22
    I was kibitzing a game at a rapid tournament i played in a few years ago. There was a young lad playing an old boy. They were locked into a time scramble and the boy announced 'time' on his opponent while he still had a few seconds on his clock. The crafty little blighter successfully distracted his opponent long enough to gain a few seconds on the clock and finally won on time. After the game the loser literally exploded! It is one of the funniest incidents i have ever witnessed at a tournament, the arbiter was called in to referee what nearly amounted to a no holds bared cage fight. The score stood, which just goes to show that there are no prizes for fair play...
  6. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    10 May '13 10:37
    Oh, this doesn't count as underhand really, but i did play a guy in a club match once who removed his prosthetic arm just as we were starting the clocks and laid it next to the board. Whether he was trying to distract me or not i'm not sure but it did strike me as some what strange timing.
  7. 10 May '13 11:06
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    Oh, this doesn't count as underhand really, but i did play a guy in a club match once who removed his prosthetic arm just as we were starting the clocks and laid it next to the board. Whether he was trying to distract me or not i'm not sure but it did strike me as some what strange timing.
    Was it an odds game?
  8. 10 May '13 11:18
    Originally posted by michael liddle
    Was it an odds game?
    Ah ha ha ha, I'll play you with one hand behind my back.

    Or next to the clock whichever you prefer.
  9. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    10 May '13 12:10
    It was really hard not to laugh as it was such an obvious ploy. Just as we're about to shake hands before the game the guy takes his arm off and shakes with the other hand!
  10. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    12 May '13 02:25
    Originally posted by michael liddle
    Was it an odds game?
    Now that's just funny!
  11. 12 May '13 17:30
    In my opinion the worst bit of 'cheating' I have seen was on the top board at a Guernsey tournament. Players A's clock timed out, which he knew cos I saw him look at it but said nothing. A few seconds later player B, not noticing this, offered player A a draw which he quickly accepted. When told what had happened Player B lodged a protest, but the adjudicator said result must stand.

    I feel that the adjudicator made a mistake because if your time runs out you have lost, therefore how can you accept a draw when the games is technically over.
  12. 12 May '13 20:04
    Originally posted by kingcolemk
    In my opinion the worst bit of 'cheating' I have seen was on the top board at a Guernsey tournament. Players A's clock timed out, which he knew cos I saw him look at it but said nothing. A few seconds later player B, not noticing this, offered player A a draw which he quickly accepted. When told what had happened Player B lodged a protest, but the adjudic ...[text shortened]... ns out you have lost, therefore how can you accept a draw when the games is technically over.
    Certainly where I play, the adjudicator is obliged to call the game lost on time if times out (standard timings). For some team games, both captains are adjudicators, so if you see this happening, by the rules you *have to* flag your teammate as having lost.

    In blitz, I tend to say that your opponent has to notice, but I don't know the rules on it.
  13. 12 May '13 22:05
    Hi kingcolemk

    We lose (and sometimes win) by rash decisions we make when playing.

    Player A seeing he has lost on time is suddenly thrown a life line with an offer
    of a draw by player B.

    "Yes." the consequences are not even considered. (much like actually playing.)

    If he had offered a draw after noticing his flag had fallen then
    that would have been different.

    So who ever it was I think we can cut him slack.
    Sounds a spur of the moment thing.
    Something like we have all seen players do after they have lost.
    I've seen and have heard about much worse cases of cheating.

    The agreed draw has to stand.
    The moment player A said "Yes" the game was over.

    I don't know what would have happened had player 'B' offered the draw then
    noticed his opponents flag had fallen before the draw was accepeted.

    I'm also not sure about an arbiter stepping in.
    In Scotland it is up to the player concerned and no one must interfere.
  14. Standard member byedidia
    Mister Why
    13 May '13 03:12
    My understanding (without bothering to check to see if I am correct) is that a win on time must be claimed. Much like a draw for thrice repeated positions.
  15. Standard member byedidia
    Mister Why
    13 May '13 03:42
    Originally posted by byedidia
    My understanding (without bothering to check to see if I am correct) is that a win on time must be claimed. Much like a draw for thrice repeated positions.
    When I bothered to check, I found that the USCF requires a player to claim the win on time but the FIDE rule is that the arbiter may claim the win for a clueless player.

    http://www.uschess.org/content/view/11750/668/