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  1. 10 Oct '06 14:38
    Which is more powerful in an end game? Two pawns against a piece? Do the pawns win? If so, why not sacrifice a piece for two pawns in the middle game?
  2. Standard member Dragon Fire
    Lord of all beasts
    10 Oct '06 14:42
    Originally posted by znsho
    Which is more powerful in an end game? Two pawns against a piece? Do the pawns win? If so, why not sacrifice a piece for two pawns in the middle game?
    It depends which piece and where the pawns and kings are.
  3. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    10 Oct '06 14:44
    Originally posted by znsho
    Which is more powerful in an end game? Two pawns against a piece? Do the pawns win? If so, why not sacrifice a piece for two pawns in the middle game?
    A pawn can become a queen (or rook), while a lone bishop or knight cannot force checkmate. However, in the middlegame with lots of pieces on the board a bishop or knight usually wields much more influence than two pawns.

    Why not make this sacrifice? It depends upon concrete analysis of the position at hand. The sacrifice is often made, not only in the middlegame, but sometimes even in the opening.

    I had an OTB game in which my opponent sacrificed a knight and then a bishop, each for two pawns. As the four passed pawns came rolling into my position, I felt helpless. In the end, his time expired when it was mate in 8, and as all I had was my king, the game was drawn.
  4. 10 Oct '06 14:51 / 1 edit
    If the King with the piece is in good position the two pawns are not enough to win. If that piece is a Rook or a Queen then the piece can win if the position is favorable. A sacrifice for two pawns can work if you can get to a favorable end game. If you miscalculate you may lose the game because the piece will be too strong.
  5. 11 Oct '06 04:59
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    I had an OTB game in which my opponent sacrificed a knight and then a bishop, each for two pawns. As the four passed pawns came rolling into my position, I felt helpless. In the end, his time expired when it was mate in 8, and as all I had was my king, the game was drawn.
    That sounds like some game! You wouldn't happen to be able to post a PGN or something like that, would you?
  6. Standard member Icky Ike
    Pro-Complainer
    11 Oct '06 05:55 / 1 edit
    Every chess book on the fundamentals I've ever read or looked at talks about the relative value of pieces in terms of pawns. A knight is worth about three and a bishop is worth about three and a half. The position of the game can outweigh this, especially in an endgame, but otherwise it is foolish to give up any piece for anything less than three pawns. Against serious opponents it will not work.