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  1. 10 Jan '08 08:33
    Chess: Understanding the Sicilian Defense
    (Najdorf Variation) Part I

    1 e4

    Controlling the central square d5 plus
    near-central square f5, and, opening
    up a diagonal for both the Queen and
    f1 bishop.

    1 ... c5

    The d4 and b4 squares are now under
    Black's influence, and his Queen also
    gets breathing space along the a5-d8
    diagonal.

    2 Nf3

    White prepares for d4 so as to
    challenge Black's hold on that
    key square.

    2 ... d6

    Shielding e5 from a prospective
    e4-e5 advance. Please remember,
    the acquisition of e5 is a
    critical theme for the defense.
    This move also opens up a
    diagonal for the c8 bishop.

    3 d4 cxd4

    By trading his c-pawn for White's
    d-pawn, Black guarantees pressure
    down the half open c-file and
    chances to mold his central pawn
    majority into a strong center.

    4 Nxd4

    In return, White gains a developmental
    lead, the half open d-file and an edge
    in space.

    4 ... Nf6

    The e4 pawn now needs protection,
    and so White responds with:

    5 Nc3

    5 ... a6

    Initiating the Najdorf Defense.

    Black achieves two goals with
    this move:
    (i) He deters White's pieces from
    intruding on the b5 square.
    (ii) He prepares for the ... b5 break,
    which, in turn, initiates queenside
    action and makes room on b7 for the
    c8 bishop.

    chesssiciliannajdorfe-book2.blogspot.com

    chesssiciliannajdorfe-book.blogspot.com

    chesssiciliannajdorfelectronic-book.blogspot.com

    chesssiciliannajdorf411.blogspot.com

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    chesssiciliannajdorfe-book1.blogspot.com

    Chess: Understanding the Sicilian Defense
    (Najdorf Variation) Part V

    1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 a6
    6 Be3 e5 7 Nb3 Be6 8 f3 Nbd7 Line (English Attack)

    What's the game plan for White?

    White intends to acquire and dominate the
    vulnerable d5 square (Qd1-d2, O-O-O,
    followed by a timely Nc3-d5). To augment
    that objective, he also aims to destabilize
    the f6 knight and subsequently eliminate its
    d5 influence (g2-g4-g5/h2-h4/Rh1-g1). Finally,
    he wants to avail himself of the c5 square
    (Qd2-f2/Nb3-c5/Be3-c5), thanks to a more than
    likely Rd1-Qd8 x-ray, which prevents ... dxc5.
  2. 10 Jan '08 22:22
    I like your article, but the last thing I want is more Najdorf players. It's already way too popular and there are so many excellent less explored openings.
  3. Standard member irontigran
    Rob Scheider is..
    10 Jan '08 22:24
    how do you pronounce that anyway?
  4. 10 Jan '08 22:29 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by jvanhine
    how do you pronounce that anyway?
    I think Najdorf is pronounced ny-dorf. The first syllable rhyming with my.
  5. Standard member bannedplayer306509
    Best Loser
    10 Jan '08 22:30
    after a6 white can play Bg5 and get a pretty good game. I find the difference between Bg5 and Be3 is that with Bg5 white can call the shots a little bit more... it may not be any 'better' but it does make white's life a little easier I find.
  6. Standard member irontigran
    Rob Scheider is..
    10 Jan '08 22:36
    Originally posted by Squelchbelch
    I think Najdorf is pronounced ny-dorf. The first syllable rhyming with my.
    thanks, its sounds like a silly question but ive been wondering that one for a while..
  7. 11 Jan '08 14:34
    Originally posted by ih8sens
    after a6 white can play Bg5 and get a pretty good game. I find the difference between Bg5 and Be3 is that with Bg5 white can call the shots a little bit more... it may not be any 'better' but it does make white's life a little easier I find.
    Also I think Bg5 allows the poison pawn variation (Qb6) while Be3 does not.
  8. Standard member najdorfslayer
    The Ever Living
    11 Jan '08 18:01
    Originally posted by greengiant101
    Chess: Understanding the Sicilian Defense
    (Najdorf Variation) Part I

    1 e4

    Controlling the central square d5 plus
    near-central square f5, and, opening
    up a diagonal for both the Queen and
    f1 bishop.

    1 ... c5

    The d4 and b4 squares are now under
    Black's influence, and his Queen also
    gets breathing space along the a5-d8
    diagonal.

    2 ...[text shortened]... d2-f2/Nb3-c5/Be3-c5), thanks to a more than
    likely Rd1-Qd8 x-ray, which prevents ... dxc5.
    If only it was so easy!
  9. Donation !~TONY~!
    1...c5!
    11 Jan '08 19:08
    Originally posted by zebano
    Also I think Bg5 allows the poison pawn variation (Qb6) while Be3 does not.
    It does allow the poison pawn, but lately the old line with Qd2 Qxb2 Rb1 Qa3 e5! has been giving black all kinds of problems.
  10. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    11 Jan '08 19:13
    Isn't Najdorf one of the most complicated chess openings ? I think 1600 player shouldn't bother with it? Or I am wrong ?
  11. 11 Jan '08 19:27 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    Isn't Najdorf one of the most complicated chess openings ? I think 1600 player shouldn't bother with it? Or I am wrong ?
    You may be right, but he's simply copying a book ... or I thought so, I'm not really sure. It doesn't seem like any book I've ever read.
  12. Standard member bannedplayer306509
    Best Loser
    11 Jan '08 19:46
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    Isn't Najdorf one of the most complicated chess openings ? I think 1600 player shouldn't bother with it? Or I am wrong ?
    Well both players are equally handicapped in it

    It's like the traxler... just because it's so hard not even engines can fully understand it doesn't mean that you have to be stronger than an engine to play it!
  13. 11 Jan '08 20:22
    I don't know about being equally handicapped. White often has easier play and needs less precision. But yes, most people under 1600 don't know how to handle it from either side. I think the Najdorf is too popular and theoretical now to justify the enormous time investment it requires under the GM level.
  14. 11 Jan '08 20:45
    Originally posted by exigentsky
    I don't know about being equally handicapped. White often has easier play and needs less precision. But yes, most people under 1600 don't know how to handle it from either side. I think the Najdorf is too popular and theoretical now to justify the enormous time investment it requires under the GM level.
    And judging from this opening's disappearance from the World Championships in Mexico, even the top GMs are worried about what novelty or improvement they might have missed at move 30 in the Najdorf labyrinth.
  15. 11 Jan '08 22:27
    Originally posted by zebano
    You may be right, but he's simply copying a book ... or I thought so, I'm not really sure. It doesn't seem like any book I've ever read.
    Hi, zebano

    Please allow me to correct your statement
    that the e-books I'm putting together are
    mere duplicates.

    What you have before you is an honest
    amalgamation of the Najdorf resources
    available to me-playing experience, human-
    guided computer analysis, theoretical tomes,
    and much more. Of greater importance though
    is the collective wisdom that goes into the e-books
    when people provide constructive feedback.

    Not to say your response isn't purposeful at all.
    I just felt the need to explain myself that’s all.

    Have a splendiferous day.