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  1. 11 Mar '06 17:26
    Hello

    Looking through a few books I keep seeing the phrase 'sharp lines' mentioned (in relation to chess), but I've never really seen a good explanation for the use of this term. I wonder if someone might be kind enough to perhaps show me (and us thickies) how a 'sharp line' might develop from an opening, why it is sharp, and possibly how to make us of it? Not too much to ask is it ?

    many thanks in advance
  2. 11 Mar '06 18:06
    A sharp line basically means very tactical and very complicated. Occaisonally with no clear way through or the advantage quickly shifting from one player to another.

    Examples of a sharp line could be:

    From's Gambit - Lasker variation
    Sicilian Najdorf- Poison pawn variation
    French Winawer with Qg4

    On the flip side you can have opening where there is often a commonly accepted sequence of moves leading to equality/slight inferiority.

    Examples include:

    French Classical or exchange
    Queens Gambit declined - orthodox variation

    Hope that helps.
  3. 11 Mar '06 19:15
    I think a sharp line is a serie of moves that has to be played in that particular order. The player that deviates from it will lose immediately.
  4. 11 Mar '06 19:21
    Sharp-Bold.aggressive moves or positions. A sharp player who revels in dynamic. tactical situations. Term from www.angelfire.comSBChess/glossery.
  5. 11 Mar '06 20:42
    I would probably called that a forced line.

    It can occur in some extremely simple positions eg. K+P vs K
  6. 11 Mar '06 23:44
    It looks like a genuine question to me. Where's the mockery?
  7. 12 Mar '06 02:42
    A sharp line is one which requires perfect play by the opponent in order to not fall into any traps, pitfalls, or swindles.
  8. 12 Mar '06 12:25
    Originally posted by General Putzer
    A sharp line is one which requires perfect play by the opponent in order to not fall into any traps, pitfalls, or swindles.
    that is what I meant, with one exeption. I think it doen't just require perfect play from the opponent, but also from yourself in most cases.