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  1. 12 Dec '11 19:02
    Why is it? in the French defence it becomes purely passive, on the white side of the
    Queens gambit its mince, in the Sicilian as black it gets swapped off on e6 , its always
    causing problems, why is that?
  2. 12 Dec '11 19:20 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    Why is it? in the French defence it becomes purely passive, on the white side of the
    Queens gambit its mince, in the Sicilian as black it gets swapped off on e6 , its always
    causing problems, why is that?
    Play the QID and develop it to b7, or a6. Its a great bishop in QGD's just take a look at the catalan! Its a great piece to swap off white's more active light squared bishop in many openings.

    Q
  3. 12 Dec '11 19:22
    The dark squared bishop (the Queen's bishop) is immensely important for White in the Sicilian Defense, which is why black tries to get rid of it.
  4. 12 Dec '11 19:24
    Originally posted by PhySiQ
    Play the QID and develop it to b7, or a6. Its a great bishop in QGD's just take a look at the catalan! Its a great piece to swap off white's more active light squared bishop in many openings.

    Q
    Sure, thats fine Q, when white plays 2.Nf3, i was just wondering what it is about the
    dynamics of chess that make this a problem piece. No one hardly has any trouble
    knowing what to do with their Kings bishop by comparison.
  5. 12 Dec '11 19:26
    Originally posted by chesskid001
    The dark squared bishop (the Queen's bishop) is immensely important for White in the Sicilian Defense, which is why black tries to get rid of it.
    Sure chesskid, i understand that, but when one thinks of the comparison with the Kings
    bishop, its hardly ever a problem.
  6. 12 Dec '11 19:34
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    Sure, thats fine Q, when white plays 2.Nf3, i was just wondering what it is about the
    dynamics of chess that make this a problem piece. No one hardly has any trouble
    knowing what to do with their Kings bishop by comparison.
    Thats an interesting treatise. I would say it has to do with the most popular pawn skeletons. Its strong in KID/KIA and any transposition with d6 and e5. However in Tarrasch and French like skeletons the strength of the skeleton is from f7, and lies on light squares - reigning in the subject bishop. The Tarrasch pawn skeleton isn't necessarily more secure than Kings Indian, although many feel that way.

    Its a piece thats very hard to strike central light square weaknesses after a pawn skeleton is built - without a6/b7 else b2/a3 placement due to its inherent time to develop.

    Q
  7. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    12 Dec '11 22:28
    b3 players have more optimistic views on their Bishop.
  8. 12 Dec '11 22:49
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    i was just wondering what it is about the dynamics of chess that make this a problem piece. No one hardly has any trouble knowing what to do with their Kings bishop by comparison.
    Just a guess. We know that kingside castling is quicker and more common than castling queenside. And if Black castles kingside then my light-squared bishop may target f7 or h7. Whereas, my dark-square bishop has only g7. So there's a "2 versus 1 options" in terms of which diagonals can be occupied when targetting the most common enemy king location. That may help make things easier for the light-squared bishop.
  9. 12 Dec '11 23:17
    In both the french and the QGD it's the sacrifice you make to get a solid centre as black. Defenses that allow you to freely develop that bishop are all less solid in the centre. Caro-kann and slav are exceptions but you play c5 in two moves rather than one in those, so pick what you like 🙂
  10. Subscriber Paul Leggettonline
    Chess Librarian
    12 Dec '11 23:53
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    Why is it? in the French defence it becomes purely passive, on the white side of the
    Queens gambit its mince, in the Sicilian as black it gets swapped off on e6 , its always
    causing problems, why is that?
    If black does not have his queen's bishop in the King's Indian Classical, his kingside attack is over.

    (I stole that [paraphrased] from Kasparov, but the comment struck me as so direct when I read it that it imprinted on my brain for all time).
  11. Subscriber Paul Leggettonline
    Chess Librarian
    12 Dec '11 23:56
    Originally posted by chesskid001
    The dark squared bishop (the Queen's bishop) is immensely important for White in the Sicilian Defense, which is why black tries to get rid of it.
    Excellent point- we can embellish it to say that in any black fianchetto defense, exchanging for white's queen bishop is a moral victory and a practical path to equality. It's why white plays f3 and/or h3 in so many lines.
  12. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    13 Dec '11 00:44
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    If black does not have his queen's bishop in the King's Indian Classical, his kingside attack is over.

    (I stole that [paraphrased] from Kasparov, but the comment struck me as so direct when I read it that it imprinted on my brain for all time).
    I was going to say something similar about dutch leningrad. 🙂 it's a nice piece to have. just don't play those silly openings that completely bury it and you'll be fine. use it as the iron booted assassin the bishops are meant to be. 🙂
  13. 16 Dec '11 05:36 / 4 edits
    Master Robbie - I have been in intense debate with myself as to expressing the worth of your queens bishop. Now I myself prefer its use in the QID. This being an opening I'm familiar with would like to share a classic with you. I'm assuming basic familiarity with the QID and fianchetto systems in general. One of the most dynamic defenses of the Colle system (a favorite of yours I've noticed!) is in fact a Queen's Indian style set-up. White's pawn push to e4 attacks empty space. Black instead poises his pieces to undermine White's center. The technique is well illustrated in the 1929 game between Colle and Jose Capablanca.

    I have chosen this game especially because it is well annotated in many texts - with the intention that you may study yourself should you find disagreement in my assessments of this great game. Kings to you robbie!



    Q
  14. 16 Dec '11 06:04
    Q i like your style please keep writing this stuffs ive never thought of any of these things when i play my games
  15. 16 Dec '11 06:11
    Originally posted by PhySiQ
    Master Robbie - I have been in intense debate with myself as to expressing the worth of your queens bishop. Now I myself prefer its use in the QID. This being an opening I'm familiar with would like to share a classic with you. I'm assuming basic familiarity with the QID and fianchetto systems in general. One of the most dynamic defenses of the Colle syst ...[text shortened]... exf5 31. fxe5 Re7 32. Re3 Qxb2 33. e6 dxe6 34. Rxe6 Kf7 0-1[/pgn]

    Q
    Maybe you'd consider authoring a rival blog to mister greenpawn34? 😉