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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    06 Jul '07 21:09
    What single linear measurement can you take of a washer to calculate its area?

    (washer = circular disc with smaller concentric circular hole)
  2. Standard member agryson
    AGW Hitman
    06 Jul '07 21:31
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    What single linear measurement can you take of a washer to calculate its area?

    (washer = circular disc with smaller concentric circular hole)
    A chord of the outer circle which is also a tangent of the inner circle. I don't know why or how... but my gut says so...
  3. Standard member Ragnorak
    For RHP addons...
    06 Jul '07 21:36
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    What single linear measurement can you take of a washer to calculate its area?

    (washer = circular disc with smaller concentric circular hole)
    Is this a puzzle or a genuine question?

    D
  4. Standard member Ragnorak
    For RHP addons...
    06 Jul '07 21:37
    Originally posted by agryson
    A chord of the outer circle which is also a tangent of the inner circle. I don't know why or how... but my gut says so...
    It's the only possible answer, but I don't see how either.

    I think you'd need to measure the radius of the hole and the washer.

    D
  5. 06 Jul '07 22:12
    I did some calculations.... that seems to be the right answer! Not a proof or anything but here it is:

    Take a washer w/ outer radius = 2 and inner radius = 1. The area = 2^2*pi - 1^2*pi = 3pi. Make a triangle w/ the chord and the center and cut it in half to make 2 right trianlges. Use good ol' a^2 + b^2 = c^2 and you get the chord = 2*sqrt(3).

    Now take a random outer radius... lets say 4. Doing pretty much the same thing, you get an inner radius of sqrt(13). Then, 4^2*pi -sqrt(13)^2 * pi = 3pi.

    Also works for outer radius of 5, but haven't tried different chord lengths.
  6. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's about respect
    06 Jul '07 23:40 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    What single linear measurement can you take of a washer to calculate its area?

    (washer = circular disc with smaller concentric circular hole)
    The distance from the inner hole to the outer edge.

    EDIT - Guess not.
  7. 07 Jul '07 09:10
    Ok, the line is a chord of the big circle which is a tangent to the smaller circle. Then only use half of that line (up to where it touches the smaller circle)
    We'll call the length of this line M for measurement.
    If you take the point at which the chord touches the bigger circle and draw a line from here to the centre of both circles, you get the radius of the bigger circle. We'll call this B for big. If you now draw a line from the middle of both circles to the tangent at M then we get the radius of the small circle, or S for small. We have a right angled triangle. Thus B^2 = M^2 + S^2.
    The area of the big circle is PiB^2. The area of the small circle is PiS^2. The area of the whole thing is PiB^2-PiS^2 or Pi(B^2-S^2). We know that B^2-S^2=M^2 and so the area of the washer is PiM^2.
  8. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    07 Jul '07 09:13
    A genuine question and a puzzle. :-D
  9. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    07 Jul '07 09:13
    A very elegant proof Sir!