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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Apr '06 15:07
    I hope you didn't read a certain recent thread where I figured it out!
  2. 11 Apr '06 15:12
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I hope you didn't read a certain recent thread where I figured it out!
    How?
  3. 11 Apr '06 15:13
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I hope you didn't read a certain recent thread where I figured it out!
    If you by "=" mean "equal to" by standard base ten arithmetics I wold say that this postulate is false.

    If you by "200" mean "5 halfves" then all make perfectly sense (!)
    If you by "5" mean "four hundred" then all make perfectly sense (!)
    If you by "+" mean any operation that make 200+200=500 then all make perfectly sense (!)

    In any other case 200+200 is not = 5. (?)
  4. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Apr '06 15:29
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    If you by "=" mean "equal to" by standard base ten arithmetics I wold say that this postulate is false.

    If you by "200" mean "5 halfves" then all make perfectly sense (!)
    If you by "5" mean "four hundred" then all make perfectly sense (!)
    If you by "+" mean any operation that make 200+200=500 then all make perfectly sense (!)

    In any other case 200+200 is not = 5. (?)
    AH, clearly you did not read the recent thread where I figured it out.
    Good, that makes it a real puzzle for you,
    So its two hundred plus two hundred equals 5 in base ten. Its a regular addition and the = sign is a normal run of the mill equal sign and the 5 is a standard issue base ten 1 2 3 4 5 kind of integer.
    So whats going on?
  5. 11 Apr '06 16:24
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    AH, clearly you did not read the recent thread where I figured it out.
    Oh, but I did!

    I wrote "in standard base ten arithmetics", didn't I?
    That means exactly as it says.
    If 200+200=5 - then it isn't in any standard base ten arithmetics, how could it?

    Are we talking solid mathematics here or some kind of kindergarten counting?
  6. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Apr '06 16:40
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Oh, but I did!

    I wrote "in standard base ten arithmetics", didn't I?
    That means exactly as it says.
    If 200+200=5 - then it isn't in any standard base ten arithmetics, how could it?

    Are we talking solid mathematics here or some kind of kindergarten counting?
    Well, semi-solid math anyway! Its a real representation, mathematically correct.
  7. 11 Apr '06 17:46
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Well, semi-solid math anyway! Its a real representation, mathematically correct.
    Well, then I have to wait for the solution.

    I asked my math professor: "What is 200 + 200, professor?" And he said "If you don't know that, you have to start from the low grade beginning again. Approximatly 400, of course!" Approx? Yes, he teaches numerical methods...

    My local banker probably believs it, I think.
    "If I save 200 Euro one month and saves 200 Euro next months, how much money do I have in my accont thereafter?"
    "About 5 Euro, after the tax beeing paid.", she will answer...
  8. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Apr '06 18:12
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Well, then I have to wait for the solution.

    I asked my math professor: "What is 200 + 200, professor?" And he said "If you don't know that, you have to start from the low grade beginning again. Approximatly 400, of course!" Approx? Yes, he teaches numerical methods...

    My local banker probably believs it, I think.
    "If I save 200 Euro one month and s ...[text shortened]... my accont thereafter?"
    "About 5 Euro, after the tax beeing paid.", she will answer...
    hehe, good one. I hear the taxes in Ireland are 55%. I would like to retire there some century, apparently not this one however!
    And of course in base ten your professor is correct. OOPS I just threw in a big hint.
  9. 11 Apr '06 18:20
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    And of course in base ten your professor is correct. OOPS I just threw in a big hint.
    The smallest base you can use a symbol "5" in is base 6.
    200 in base 6 is 72 in base 10. 72+72 in base 10 is 144 in base 10 which is in base 6 ... far more than 5 anyway. And in higher bases the difference is even more.

    Are we talking base or modulus? I think you are using modulus arithmetics, am I right?
  10. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Apr '06 18:24
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    The smallest base you can use a symbol "5" in is base 6.
    200 in base 6 is 72 in base 10. 72+72 in base 10 is 144 in base 10 which is in base 6 ... far more than 5 anyway. And in higher bases the difference is even more.

    Are we talking base or modulus? I think you are using modulus arithmetics, am I right?
    Its not modulus, its a base thing. You have to make one mental jump though.
  11. 11 Apr '06 18:45
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Its not modulus, its a base thing. You have to make one mental jump though.
    Well, than I have to wait for the answer, but in my mathematical world I don't think there is any indisputable answer
  12. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Apr '06 18:48
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Well, than I have to wait for the answer, but in my mathematical world I don't think there is any indisputable answer
    Ok, here is a hint: base systems don't have to use integers.
  13. 11 Apr '06 20:19
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Ok, here is a hint: base systems don't have to use integers.
    I wrote "in standard base ten arithmetics", didn't I?
    That means the decimal base system, not binary, not octally, not hexadecimally, but decimally with the base of ten.

    I know of course that A hexadecimally means 10 decimally, no funny with that. In binary 1 + 1 = 10 but now we are talking of base ten arithmetics, didn't we?

    So if 200+200=5, then it is not plain old fashion base ten arithemtics we're talking about...? And that is exactly what I've said from the beginning.

    Now, am I right or am I right?
  14. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Apr '06 20:27
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    I wrote "in standard base ten arithmetics", didn't I?
    That means the decimal base system, not binary, not octally, not hexadecimally, but decimally with the base of ten.

    I know of course that A hexadecimally means 10 decimally, no funny with that. In binary 1 + 1 = 10 but now we are talking of base ten arithmetics, didn't we?

    So if 200+200=5, then ...[text shortened]... ? And that is exactly what I've said from the beginning.

    Now, am I right or am I right?
    If you note, I said the 5 is in base ten. hint hint.
  15. Standard member leisurelysloth
    Man of Steel
    11 Apr '06 21:43 / 2 edits
    Does 200 = 200 or are these in different bases as well? It would seems that there might be multiple "correct" answers.

    EDIT: If 200 = 200, then 200 = 2.5,
    or 100 = 1.25 or 5/4, so it would seem that the base is (5/4)^0.5

    This would be an odd counting system, however, as:

    100 = 1.25
    200 = 2.5
    1000 = ~1.4

    200 > 1000 ???

    Or perhaps my math is wrong.... It's been about 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 years since I took any math classes!