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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. 17 Aug '07 15:08
    bearing in mind guinness is full of vitamins, iron and nutrients (so what they tell me!) if my diet consisted of nothing but drinking guinness would i stay alive?
  2. 17 Aug '07 15:17
    Originally posted by eatmybishop
    bearing in mind guinness is full of vitamins, iron and nutrients (so what they tell me!) if my diet consisted of nothing but drinking guinness would i stay alive?
    "Guinness only contains 198 calories (838 kilojoules) per imperial pint (20oz UK) (1460 kJ/L), fewer than an equal-sized serving of skimmed milk or orange juice and most other non-light beers." (wikipedia)


    Your body (active adult) requires 3000 calories / day..
    You'll need 15 pints a day ... You might survive for a few days, but also get very drunk
  3. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    17 Aug '07 15:31
    Originally posted by Maria Von Kempelen
    "Guinness only contains 198 calories (838 kilojoules) per imperial pint (20oz UK) (1460 kJ/L), fewer than an equal-sized serving of skimmed milk or orange juice and most other non-light beers." (wikipedia)


    Your body (active adult) requires 3000 calories / day..
    You'll need 15 pints a day ... You might survive for a few days, but also get very drunk
    Bob Blumer, spastic and mincing host of a terrible Food Network Canada show called "Glutton for Punishment", did this for 5 days. I was hoping he would die, but he didn't even come close. I'm not sure if he was allowed to drink water too (he must have), but alas, he's still alive.
  4. 17 Aug '07 15:36
    Originally posted by eatmybishop
    bearing in mind guinness is full of vitamins, iron and nutrients (so what they tell me!) if my diet consisted of nothing but drinking guinness would i stay alive?
    If I say like this: You will be happy in the rest of your (short) life!
  5. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Proud Boys Beware
    17 Aug '07 17:51
    Originally posted by PBE6
    Bob Blumer, spastic and mincing host of a terrible Food Network Canada show called "Glutton for Punishment", did this for 5 days. I was hoping he would die, but he didn't even come close. I'm not sure if he was allowed to drink water too (he must have), but alas, he's still alive.
    He might not have needed to drink water. In Europe alcohol was used instead of water because it was safe.
  6. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    17 Aug '07 18:00
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    He might not have needed to drink water. In Europe alcohol was used instead of water because it was safe.
    Interesting...I know that most of Guinness is water, but I thought the alcohol had a net dehydrating effect on the body. Possibly not enough to make you die of thirst, though.
  7. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Proud Boys Beware
    17 Aug '07 18:12
    Originally posted by PBE6
    Interesting...I know that most of Guinness is water, but I thought the alcohol had a net dehydrating effect on the body. Possibly not enough to make you die of thirst, though.
    Depends how concentrated the alcohol is. Caffeine's a diuretic too, but Coke's been putting out commercials that their product has been proven to hydrate. I guess the caffeine level is low enough that some of the water stays.
  8. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    17 Aug '07 18:48
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Depends how concentrated the alcohol is. Caffeine's a diuretic too, but Coke's been putting out commercials that their product has been proven to hydrate. I guess the caffeine level is low enough that some of the water stays.
    According to the BBC, the diuretic effect of alcohol ensures that you pee out more water more than you ingest in the drink itself:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/hottopics/alcohol/hangovers.shtml
  9. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Proud Boys Beware
    17 Aug '07 18:52
    Originally posted by PBE6
    According to the BBC, the diuretic effect of alcohol ensures that you pee out more water more than you ingest in the drink itself:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/hottopics/alcohol/hangovers.shtml
    Here's what was said:

    Alcohol is a diuretic, which makes you wee more. In fact, you lose far more water in your urine than you are taking in the drink itself.

    I still say it depends on the concentration. Otherwise a drop of ethanol in a pitcher of water would cause hangovers.
  10. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Proud Boys Beware
    17 Aug '07 18:55
    In four separate trial conditions, six subjects consumed drinks containing 0, 1, 2, and 4% alcohol over 60-minute period, beginning 30 minutes after the end of a dehydrating exercise session. Although a different beverage was consumed in each condition, the volume remained constant at just over two litres (equivalent to 150% of body mass loss during exercise – the amount recommended for efficient hydration).

    The researchers found that the total volume of urine produced in the six hours after rehydration tended to increase in line with the alcohol content of drinks. Furthermore, the increase in blood and plasma volume during this rehydration period was markedly slower with the 4% beverage and did not ultimately rise significantly above the dehydrated level! The researchers concluded that while alcohol has a negligible diuretic effect when consumed in dilute solution (2% or less), drinks containing 4% or more of alcohol tend to delay the recovery process.

    http://www.pponline.co.uk/encyc/caffeine-dehydration.htm
  11. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    17 Aug '07 19:02 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Here's what was said:

    Alcohol is a diuretic, which makes you wee more. In fact, you lose far more water in your urine than you are taking in the drink itself.

    I still say it depends on the concentration. Otherwise a drop of ethanol in a pitcher of water would cause hangovers.
    Yes, absolutely. We should do an experiment. First, pee. Pee like it's going out of style. Then, once you're empty, have a pint of Guinness. Measure the volume of the drink, and calculate how much (a) alcohol; and (b) water it contains. Then wait! Next time you pee, do it into a measuring cup and check how much fluid comes out (the density of urine is almost identical to water, so you assume that it's all water). Wash, rinse, repeat! This time try a shot.

    I realize this is kind of a sketchy experiment, but it's a good excuse to drink and pee into a kitchen utensil.

    EDIT: Looks like someone beat me to it! Mine's more fun though...
  12. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Proud Boys Beware
    17 Aug '07 19:03
    Originally posted by PBE6
    Yes, absolutely. We should do an experiment. First, pee. Pee like it's going out of style. Then, once you're empty, have a pint of Guinness. Measure the volume of the drink, and calculate how much (a) alcohol; and (b) water it contains. Then wait! Next time you pee, do it into a measuring cup and check how much fluid comes out (the density of urine is al ...[text shortened]... ind of a sketchy experiment, but it's a good excuse to drink and pee into a kitchen utensil.
    See my post above. It's been done.
  13. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    17 Aug '07 19:04
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    See my post above. It's been done.
    Ha! Now YOU read MY post above (the edit part).
  14. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Proud Boys Beware
    17 Aug '07 19:06
    Originally posted by PBE6
    Ha! Now YOU read MY post above (the edit part).
    Ha ha! See MY post above - wait, it's not there.
  15. Subscriber lilchristopher
    Baruk Khazad !!
    18 Aug '07 09:34 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    He might not have needed to drink water. In Europe alcohol was used instead of water because it was safe.
    Beer was certainly the drink of preference in medieval times but most of what was drunk would be 'small beer' produced from the second or subsequent re-use of the mash. This would be significantly lower in alcohol content that the first brewing and so the diuretic effect would be similarly low.