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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. 08 Sep '09 11:57
    This week-end I was in Munich, Germany.
    At a bar I ordered a Dry Martini, and I got three. Why?

    (Yes, it'a a joke question.)
  2. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    08 Sep '09 13:17
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    This week-end I was in Munich, Germany.
    At a bar I ordered a Dry Martini, and I got three. Why?

    (Yes, it'a a joke question.)
    "Dry" = "drei" = "three" in German.

    If this were L.A., you'd be laughed out of the Laugh Factory. Time to get some better material.
  3. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    08 Sep '09 16:39
    Two things I like about Swedes;
    1. They love to get drunk.
    2. They love silly word play jokes.

    I remember a dinner party I held for some Swedish friends, despite speaking excellent English they repeatedly broke into fits of laughter over the fact that we had a vegetable called a swede.
    (Of course they were exceedingly drunk at the time ....)
  4. 08 Sep '09 19:28
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    Two things I like about Swedes;
    1. They love to get drunk.
    2. They love silly word play jokes.

    I remember a dinner party I held for some Swedish friends, despite speaking excellent English they repeatedly broke into fits of laughter over the fact that we had a vegetable called a swede.
    (Of course they were exceedingly drunk at the time ....)
    Yes, it's fun to be drunk, but not overly drink.
    Yes, I love silly word play jokes.
    I'm a Sweed? Yes, but not the vegetable one!

    Okay, the Drei Martini answer was correct.

    In Munich there was also an italian place. I went there and at the bar I ordered, in my best Italian language I could produce, Vorrei Martini per favore. And she asked me Cuanto? (How many?) Why did she do that?

    (This question is not very much serious either.)
  5. 09 Sep '09 21:15
    Originally posted by PBE6
    "Dry" = "drei" = "three" in German.

    If this were L.A., you'd be laughed out of the Laugh Factory. Time to get some better material.
    Similar to:

    Two Germans walk into a British bar. The bartender offers - dry martini? - to which the Germans reply - no, zwei martini.

    (zwei = two in german)
  6. 09 Sep '09 21:17 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Yes, it's fun to be drunk, but not overly drink.
    Yes, I love silly word play jokes.
    I'm a Sweed? Yes, but not the vegetable one!

    Okay, the Drei Martini answer was correct.

    In Munich there was also an italian place. I went there and at the bar I ordered, in my best Italian language I could produce, Vorrei Martini per favore. And she asked me Cuanto? (How many?) Why did she do that?

    (This question is not very much serious either.)
    Not trying to be nit-picky or anything, but it's 'quanto', not 'cuanto'.

    And did she ask 'how many?' because there wasn't an 'uno' before the 'martini'?
  7. 10 Sep '09 08:43
    Originally posted by Kristaps
    Not trying to be nit-picky or anything, but it's 'quanto', not 'cuanto'.

    And did she ask 'how many?' because there wasn't an 'uno' before the 'martini'?
    Yes, vero, quanto is spanish, I mix them now and then. Cuanto it should be.

    A hint: The bartender was not very good bartender.

    Another joke that dosn't merit any comedy house, stand-up nor sit-down:

    A language professor went into a bar ordering a Martino. "Ah, you mean Martini?" "No, if I wanted more than one, I would have told you so."

    And this was the last hint.
  8. 10 Sep '09 11:26
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Yes, vero, quanto is spanish, I mix them now and then. Cuanto it should be.

    A hint: The bartender was not very good bartender.

    Another joke that dosn't merit any comedy house, stand-up nor sit-down:

    A language professor went into a bar ordering a Martino. "Ah, you mean Martini?" "No, if I wanted more than one, I would have told you so."

    And this was the last hint.
    Quanto is Italian. I don't know about Spanish though, never studied it.

    I don't know about that question about the bad bartender, all I can figure I've already posted.
  9. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    10 Sep '09 17:30
    Tried an online Italian-English translator

    Martino = Martino

    Martini = Mars

  10. 10 Sep '09 21:52
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Yes, it's fun to be drunk, but not overly drink.
    Yes, I love silly word play jokes.
    I'm a Sweed? Yes, but not the vegetable one!

    Okay, the Drei Martini answer was correct.

    In Munich there was also an italian place. I went there and at the bar I ordered, in my best Italian language I could produce, Vorrei Martini per favore. And she asked me Cuanto? (How many?) Why did she do that?

    (This question is not very much serious either.)
    i think the joke is that "i" is the plural masculine suffix in italian, whereas "o" is the singular masculine. and since the drink martini ends in "i" an italian bartender would assume the plural was being requested?
  11. 14 Sep '09 12:48
    Originally posted by Aetherael
    i think the joke is that "i" is the plural masculine suffix in italian, whereas "o" is the singular masculine. and since the drink martini ends in "i" an italian bartender would assume the plural was being requested?
    You're perfectly right.

    A noun ending with -o is singular.
    A noun ending with -i is plural.
  12. 14 Sep '09 15:04 / 1 edit
    [url=http://www.google.com/]google[/url] i guess links don't work in the public forums at all... sorry was just testing.
  13. 14 Sep '09 16:25
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    You're perfectly right.

    A noun ending with -o is singular.
    A noun ending with -i is plural.
    yes, as in scampo - scampi