Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Joined
    25 Aug '06
    Moves
    0
    24 Apr '08 19:52


    White to play and mate in exactly n moves. How many ways (as a function of n)?
  2. In Christ
    Joined
    30 Apr '07
    Moves
    172
    24 Apr '08 22:081 edit
    The term "Fibonacci" comes to mind...

    F(n) = {1, n = 1,2; F(n-1) + F(n-2), n > 2}
  3. Joined
    25 Aug '06
    Moves
    0
    24 Apr '08 23:21
    Originally posted by Jirakon
    The term "Fibonacci" comes to mind...

    F(n) = {1, n = 1,2; F(n-1) + F(n-2), n > 2}
    That's true🙂
  4. Joined
    15 Feb '07
    Moves
    667
    25 Apr '08 02:08
    True until threefold repetition kicks in and the game is declared a draw.
  5. Joined
    25 Aug '06
    Moves
    0
    25 Apr '08 10:36
    Originally posted by geepamoogle
    True until threefold repetition kicks in and the game is declared a draw.
    According to the chess problemists' codex, in chess problems the threefold repetition law is used only in retros.
  6. Standard memberSwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    2014.05.01
    Joined
    11 Apr '07
    Moves
    92274
    25 Apr '08 16:49
    Originally posted by David113
    According to the chess problemists' codex, in chess problems the threefold repetition law is used only in retros.
    No, that's false. You are confusing the 3-fold repetition rule with the 50-move rule.
    Article 17 - 50 Moves-Rule

    Unless expressly stipulated, the 50 moves-rule does not apply to the solution of chess compositions except for retro-problems.

    Article 18 - Repetition of Position

    A position is considered as a draw if it can be proved that an identical position [21] has occured three times in the proof game combined with the solution.

    www.saunalahti.fi/~stniekat/pccc/codex.htm
  7. Backside of desert
    Joined
    09 Nov '06
    Moves
    14828
    30 Apr '08 14:06
    Originally posted by David113
    According to the chess problemists' codex, in chess problems the threefold repetition law is used only in retros.
    Mate in "n" moves implies that your oponent has no outs.
    after at most 7 moves your oppnent has two legal moves: shuffle the bishop, declare a draw.
    as the "self mate" stipulation was not indicated the game ends on move 7 where white must mate in order to avoid a draw.

    Solutions to mate in 1-7 follow fibonacci
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