Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Standard memberXanthosNZ
    Cancerous Bus Crash
    p^2.sin(phi)
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    27 Aug '06 12:32
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Bteadboarding the sensors. Get it, breadboard, ice cream.... ok, I'll slink away now..
    That makes no sense at all.
  2. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
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    28 Aug '06 02:44
    Originally posted by XanthosNZ
    That makes no sense at all.
    It was a bit oblique..
    So what did you want breadboarded?
  3. Standard memberXanthosNZ
    Cancerous Bus Crash
    p^2.sin(phi)
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    28 Aug '06 03:23
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It was a bit oblique..
    So what did you want breadboarded?
    I was saying that whenever I want to test a circuit I breadboard it in response to leisurelysloth's statement that no one uses through-hole resistors anymore.

    I recently made a pretty good audio amplifier using a differential amplifier setup with some output stages. All breadboarded using through hole resistors.
  4. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
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    28 Aug '06 03:582 edits
    Originally posted by XanthosNZ
    I was saying that whenever I want to test a circuit I breadboard it in response to leisurelysloth's statement that no one uses through-hole resistors anymore.

    I recently made a pretty good audio amplifier using a differential amplifier setup with some output stages. All breadboarded using through hole resistors.
    Ah, yep, radioshack even sells both breadboards and resistors. I designed and built a precision 8 millivolt source to be used as a TC gauge simulator, we had previously used a variable precision millivolt power supply but it was borrowed and the owner had the nerve to want it back! I first started with just a AA cell and voltage dividers but soon learned that I could set it up to 8 millivolts ok but it lost about 10 microvolts per day as the battery aged. (It was a brand new alkyline one) So I found a precision IC voltage regulator that put out 1.032 volts exactly and used positive and negative temperature response resistors and small pots to get the 1;128 ratio I needed. All done with breadboard and readily available resistors. I put the thing in a box surrounded by a half inch of insulation and powered THAT by two AA cells so it worked out well. One of a kind for sure.
    It was accurate to within 1 microvolt and held that for weeks on end without fuss or bother. After a couple of months I would check it and it was right on!
    The furnace computer required a precision voltage referance that simulated the output of a TC that was in a 1300 degree C field, I think it was a 10% Rhodium/platinum, 30%/Rh set. Forget the designation. S maybe.
  5. Standard memberleisurelysloth
    Man of Steel
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    28 Aug '06 18:13
    Originally posted by XanthosNZ
    Anyone who wants to breadboard a circuit design?
    'twas a joke, X. They're also useful if you want to kludge up an existing design--might save you a wire or two. Not that I'd do anything like that.... 😳
  6. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
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    28 Aug '06 19:02
    Originally posted by leisurelysloth
    'twas a joke, X. They're also useful if you want to kludge up an existing design--might save you a wire or two. Not that I'd do anything like that.... 😳
    The funniest breadboard I ever had to do was a 400 mhz digital cirquit for the TDRSS satellite. I was ordered to breadboard this circuit and I protested, saying you can't expect a circuit running at almost microwave frequencies to run with bare wire floating around like antennae. So the boss says, just do it. So I did it. Well it turned into a giant oscillator just like I said. I couldn't believe the guy wouldn't know that up front. It had to be proved.
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